#1
Hey guys! I need help knowing what to do next.

Here's some background. I've been playing guitar for about 10+ years now. I know scales. I know chords. I know how to build chords. I know about modes (in theory, not practice). I've played with a church band as lead guitarist and rhythm (ac. and el.) guitarist (sometimes ONLY guitarist and lately, the ONLY instrument besides bass) for going on 10+ years now. I can play a decent solo most of the time. I use a couple forms of the pentatonic scale for most of my soloing.

My limitations: I only know the notes (by memory) on the upper 2 strings. The other notes are known by patterns in a scale or a chord formation. I can't play a really fast solo because my fingers don't work that fast and neither does my brain. I can only nail a good solo if I memorize a solo someone else has played, OR if I play in a specific pentatonic formation. If that formation is not in a good spot on the neck, that's too bad... I basically have to play it there.

What should I do? I want to start practicing and teaching myself so I can get better. Where should I start? What will be the most beneficial to me at this point? Any specific websites that offer intermediate to advanced guitar lessons/tutes?

Thanks for your time!
#2
Truefire.com has a lot of int. and adv. lessons with good detail. I am a sucker for anything by Larry Carlton or Robben Ford.

Jam with other players at open mics or casual jams and learn their moves. Listen to horn solos especially sax as it applies directly to guitar.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
Quote by Cajundaddy
Truefire.com has a lot of int. and adv. lessons with good detail. I am a sucker for anything by Larry Carlton or Robben Ford.

Jam with other players at open mics or casual jams and learn their moves. Listen to horn solos especially sax as it applies directly to guitar.

Thanks for the info!

Anyone have any other thoughts/suggestions?
#4
Sit down and learn a shit ton of songs/solos if you want to work on your limitations. Focusing on making them sound really good helps. Pretty simple.
#5
Quote by JustinSummerlin
Hey guys! I need help knowing what to do next.

Here's some background. I've been playing guitar for about 10+ years now. I know scales. I know chords. I know how to build chords. I know about modes (in theory, not practice). I've played with a church band as lead guitarist and rhythm (ac. and el.) guitarist (sometimes ONLY guitarist and lately, the ONLY instrument besides bass) for going on 10+ years now. I can play a decent solo most of the time. I use a couple forms of the pentatonic scale for most of my soloing.

My limitations: I only know the notes (by memory) on the upper 2 strings. The other notes are known by patterns in a scale or a chord formation. I can't play a really fast solo because my fingers don't work that fast and neither does my brain. I can only nail a good solo if I memorize a solo someone else has played, OR if I play in a specific pentatonic formation. If that formation is not in a good spot on the neck, that's too bad... I basically have to play it there.

What should I do? I want to start practicing and teaching myself so I can get better. Where should I start? What will be the most beneficial to me at this point? Any specific websites that offer intermediate to advanced guitar lessons/tutes?

Thanks for your time!


If you know the notes for the two upper strings, you pretty much already know what the notes for the rest of the strings are. You just have to re-position yourself a bit. For example, if learn how to play the notes A, B, and C on all strings. It'll pretty much look like this. Btw, you "technically" know the notes for 3 strings since there are two strings tuned to E.

|------------------------------------5-7-8--
|---------------------------10-12-13------
|---------------------2-4-5-----------------
|--------------7-9-10-----------------------
|--------0-2-3------------------------------
|--5-7-8------------------------------------

Learning anything past the 12th fret is easy-breezy since it's simply repeating itself. So if you're really struggling, just take your hand and cover up anything past the 12th fret. Doesn't look so intimidating anymore now huh?

As for the rest of your questions, I'd highly suggest you learn more theory so that you aren't stuck using only the Pentatonic scale. Why not learn your major scales since everything pretty much branches off from those scales?
#6
Quote by b00m
If you know the notes for the two upper strings, you pretty much already know what the notes for the rest of the strings are. You just have to re-position yourself a bit. For example, if learn how to play the notes A, B, and C on all strings. It'll pretty much look like this. Btw, you "technically" know the notes for 3 strings since there are two strings tuned to E.

|------------------------------------5-7-8--
|---------------------------10-12-13------
|---------------------2-4-5-----------------
|--------------7-9-10-----------------------
|--------0-2-3------------------------------
|--5-7-8------------------------------------

Learning anything past the 12th fret is easy-breezy since it's simply repeating itself. So if you're really struggling, just take your hand and cover up anything past the 12th fret. Doesn't look so intimidating anymore now huh?

As for the rest of your questions, I'd highly suggest you learn more theory so that you aren't stuck using only the Pentatonic scale. Why not learn your major scales since everything pretty much branches off from those scales?
This is excellent advice.I was stuck in the Pentatonic/blues/Dorian trap for years,I new the Major and Aeolian scales too,Those 2 scales stood me in good stead for a band i was in,Since picking the guitar back up i've been learning basic Jazz chords and noodling around with Mixalydian/Bebop scales.It opens up a whole new world and you don't feel trapped in the same old boxes.
#7
Stop focusing on theory! It's important, but even at the beginning it's 50% theory 50% practice. Learn some songs, some exercises, jam with your friends, playing is the best way to learn how to play.
#9
Hey man,

Knowing all the notes on the fretboard be later on your list of stuff to tackle. Frankly, it's pretty difficult, and applying that knowledge of the notes outside of low E and A strings requires some serious theoretical muscle.

It's a technical forum, so it probably makes sense to say that playing faster is always fun. For shredding, John Petrucci's Rock Discipline is my favorite in getting you up to freaking fast speeds, but that's mainly applicable to metal.

For expanding your sonic diversity outside of memorized solos and pentatonic licks, you're in for a huge universe and it depends on how far you want to go. It depends on how inside the rock cliche lexicon you want to stay, i.e. how bluesy/soulful do you want to stay, or how complex do you want to get? You already know all the bluesy stuff it sounds like, from SRV to Cantrell. Do you like Slash? Harmonic Minor and Natural Minor are good to look into. Eddie Van Halen? He's a hell of a technical jump and you'll get really into tapping. Or even as far as Guthrie Govan? If you haven't heard of him, check out some videos. He's as complete and versatile as they come, and if you want to get all crazy like that, then you're gonna wanna be very curious about exploring and also diligent about getting your chops up.

PM me if you wanna Skype about it.
#10
I'd work on improvising and learning how to play all over the neck (not just memorized licks in a certain spot). Get a drum machine / drum program and record yourself playing rhythm guitar along with it, then use that as a backing track for improvising. You can work on writing your own chord progressions - and therefor creating your own songs - that way as well.

There's also tons of instructional books out there for just about every style of music. Most have a CD with songs you can learn and play along with. And the good ones will also have lots of theory / technique advice as well.
#11
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned this yet but a great thing for you to do would be to get your hands on guitar pro and play along to some tabs on your computer. You can disable certain instruments and see exactly what is going on musically as you play. Guitar pro has been a really great tool to me as a musician because thanks to the aid of a great piece of computer software I have been able to fast track my guitar learning process.

If you haven't tried it yet I would highly encourage you to. It is like having an entire band with you in your bedroom that you can control with your mouse.

I can't try and sell it any more. See if you can download a trial and get an idea of what a great practice tool it is.