#1
Hello,

I have a Squier Jazz, I love the way it plays and I have no interest in spending more money on a real fender when I can upgrade the pickups, hardware, etc. My questions are do you guys have any experience with shielding or rewiring? Does it actually make a difference in electronic noise?

When I say rewiring, I just mean keeping the same wiring scheme, but upgrading the parts I am using. I'd use a premium wiring kit from StewMac. Also, would it be wise to use conductive shielding? Or is it a waste of my money?

Of course I play on replacing pickups, bridge, tuning mechanisms, but that is straight forward. I am just curious about shielding and rewiring.
#2
Aaaaaand I just realized this probably belongs in the Gear Building/Customizing thread.
#3
A number of professional guitar techs say that properly shielding the cavities and wires will significantly or completely reduce noise and him that often plague such instruments. Your shielding tape (or paint) should be conductive, and make sure that it is connected to a ground to achieve the desired effect. You will keep the same wiring scheme (or else your guitar probably will not have any sound going out of your amplifier), but you will shield the wires.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#4
Thanks, What I meant by not changing the wiring scheme is that I don't plan on adding an onboard preamp or anything like that.
#7
What kind of noise? When does it happen? If it goes away when you touch the strings, odds are it's a shielding issue. I used the shielding paint from StewMac, and it worked well. You have to completely break the bass down and hit everything. Every cavity, every little hole that wires pass through, every last bit. I used 4 coats. Make sure the back of your pickguard has some sort of shielding, too. The paint won't hold to the plastic. A spray adhesive on the underside and aluminum foil works, trim to fit. The control plate and the foil on the underside of the pickguard must come in contact with the cavity shielding to link them up. Other things can cause excess noise as well - fluorescent lights, grounding. I had a compact fluorescent in my mancave and it caused an awful noise that ending up being picked up. This is solved by an incandescent, LED, or halogen bulb. If you do all of this and you still have noise, check for broken continuity in the ground with a multimeter. The cavities, jack nut, bridge, control plate, and all pots should have continuity, meaning they should be linked. Another thing to consider is the power supply itself. If you are plugged in to an older, ungrounded circuit, it could cause an electrical hum in the amp. That's an easy one to check. If the amp hums when it's on with nothing plugged into the input jack, it's probably a power hum.

Hope this helps.
"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
- Rush, "Witch Hunt"
Last edited by deeptubes at Apr 30, 2014,
#8
It did help! and the noise i'm experiencing does go away when I touch the strings, and I have plugged the amp into many different outlets and it hasn't changed anything, so I'm guessing the shielding will help out.
#9
Quote by BridgmanBass
It did help! and the noise i'm experiencing does go away when I touch the strings, and I have plugged the amp into many different outlets and it hasn't changed anything, so I'm guessing the shielding will help out.


Actually, if the noise or "hum" goes away when you touch the strings, then you might have a grounding problem. Some basses are notorious for this; Fender is at the top of the list. The Fender basses have the ground wire bare on the end and extending through the top of the bass, beneath the bridge. The idea is that when this wire makes contact with the bridge, it completes the ground. But this does not always work - particularly if you change out the bridge for one made of something that does not ground well. Other times, there is just enough variation in the surface of the bass (i.e., it is not flat enough) that the ground wire does not make proper contact with the bottom of the bridge.

If this is the case, then you might want to solder the ground wire to something else: a screw, or some appropriate piece of metal inside the control cavity. I had a Fender Precision bass that had exactly this problem, and it drove me freaking nuts until I soldered the ground wire to a screw I placed inside the control cavity.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley