#1
so i wanted to learn some scales but the only scale i know is the blues scale i've never done any other scale.which looks like this starting from the 5th fret
Does anybody know what scales do i learn next in order? im confused where to start
Last edited by Electric Devil at Apr 29, 2014,
#2
Why do you want to learn scales out of curiosity? There's much much more to scales than just shapes around the fretboard. Scales should never be looked at like shapes, even though intuitively most people do it. Honestly if you're new to guitar I would strongly advise to not learn scales. They're a waste of time if you don't know the theory behind them, and I've never met a single beginner who actually took the time and/or wanted to learn the theory.

Just my 2 cents
#4
If you want to compose your own solo's then learn music theory and listen and play other artists solo's. Try to thoroughly analyze what it is they're playing from a theoretical perspective. It also helps to sing what you hear and record your voice, then try to take your voice and play those sounds on the guitar.
If you just want to cover solo's then just learn solo's. Scales won't help you at this point.
Last edited by vayne92 at Apr 29, 2014,
#5
Totally agree with above comments but i find scale shapes help too. There is a series of books called Fretboard Logic that really helped me learn the notes on the neck, combine that with some basic theory and you're away!
#6
You don't need shapes or books or (much) theory.
Scales are patterns of intervals - for example the major scale is the pattern:
T T S T T T S
where T is a tone interval (two frets on a guitar, such as going from C to D) and S is a semitone interval (one fret on a guitar, such as going from E to F).
From this pattern you can make any major scale you want, just pick a starting note and apply the pattern.

For metal, you're probably more interested in minor scales (probably harmonic minor). If all these terms are confusing just google them. There's nothing complicated to music theory its just a lot of new terms.
#7
Quote by vayne92
Try to thoroughly analyze what it is they're playing from a theoretical perspective.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't he need to learn scales and what not to accomplish this? :P
#8
Quote by Hardlycore
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't he need to learn scales and what not to accomplish this? :P


he can't analyze music from a theoretical perspective if he knows no theory. knowing the shapes of a scale wont help him analyze anything.
Last edited by vayne92 at Apr 29, 2014,
#9
Quote by vayne92
he can't analyze music from a theoretical perspective if he knows no theory. knowing the shapes of a scale wont help him analyze anything.


I meant that from a theoretical view of actually learn scales, not shapes. But for some reason I completely skimmed over the part where you said to learn theory right before that haha. I stand corrected.
#10
Learn the C major scale - and then Learn A Minor scale ( hint, they both contain the same notes, you'll figure out why later). Learn the name of each note in the scale. Do not simply look at it as a pattern.

Start with that. Then learn about intervals ( minor third, major third etc.). Then learn a solo from a song that uses A minor.

That should get you started.
#11
Quote by vayne92
Just my 2 cents


your 2 cents aint worth squat.

if you cant help, don't put someone down for trying to learn something.
#12
Quote by fastforded
your 2 cents aint worth squat.

if you cant help, don't put someone down for trying to learn something.




What part did i put him down exactly?
#14
I would learn all scale pattern shape positions of your chosen scale firsts you don't need to know theory in order to play guitar . I would stick to learning the shapes and maybe then improvising within the shape you have learnt
#15
TS still hasn't addressed whether he wants to cover other artists solo's or write his own. There is a significantly different approach for the two..
#16
^ Agreed.

That being said, the major pentatonic would be worth learning (if you know all the positions of the minor pentatonic, you already know it, the shapes are the same, just the notes you need to "aim for"/"target" are different. Or even the full-sized major and minor.

FWIW that's the minor pentatonic scale in the first post, not the blues scale.

ALso I agree with learning the interval make-up of a major and minor scale (and the pentatonic versions). That explains why the scale is major and minor and will save tons of work in the long run.
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Last edited by Dave_Mc at May 2, 2014,
#17
I like practising scales with alternate picking . I still suck at tremolo thou , althou I hope it oneday helps =)
#18
Quote by dazzzer30
I would learn all scale pattern shape positions of your chosen scale firsts you don't need to know theory in order to play guitar . I would stick to learning the shapes and maybe then improvising within the shape you have learnt


True, but if you know how to build major scales you'll also know how to build other scales that branch off from them. A little knowledge doesn't hurt anyone. Learn your basic theory.
#19
patterns and shapes are like a prison for me. at the beginning i thought learning scales was about memorizing separate shapes across the neck (often 5 different shapes) and shifting them if the key was different. the process had to be re-learned each time for a new scale, and i was stuck in the same area of the neck

the easiest way to play/learn scales is just to know theoretically how to build them. when i want to play a G major scale i don't think much about patterns and shapes. i calculate (or know already by heart because of the repetition, this is the case with the keys with less sharps and flats) that the notes are G A B C D E F#. i know where the notes on the fret board are so i just play them. no need to learn 5 different shapes each time
#20
Quote by vayne92
he can't analyze music from a theoretical perspective if he knows no theory. knowing the shapes of a scale wont help him analyze anything.


Tell that to the great blues players.
#21
Quote by deepfat
Tell that to the great blues players.

why bump the thread to post this pointless bit of "information"?
Actually called Mark!

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