#1
What would be a suitable Italian term to describe a piece of music that is relaxed and laid-back? Sounds kind of dreamy and retrospective, for a lack of a better choice of words. I've looked on several sites but I can't find anything.
#2
a term? just google the translation of the words youre looking for.
#3
hmm, thought there was like a set list for usable terms haha. But yeah that makes sense, since they're all just translations. I will do as you say, thank you
#4
I've used 'Sotto' in the past which means subdued. I can't think of one that means specifically dreamlike, but I wouldn't get too caught up in using Italian. Italian words are nice because they have specific musical meaning to everyone, but at the same time it's better to use an English word or words that mean exactly what you want them to mean than to use an Italian word that only sort of means what you want it to mean.

English is a totally accepted musical language so saying something like "Subdued and Dreamlike" would be fine and pretty clear. I think most musicians would get the idea of what you want there. What's the context of this?

EDIT: ^Don't do that. Like I said, Italian terms are good because everyone knows what they mean, but using random Italian words that don't have accepted implications in music is useless. Just use English.
#6
This is for a GCSE composition (schoolwork) and for some reason my teacher absolutely insists on using Italian terms… I've already annotated some of it (in pencil) before reading the 2 most recent posts, and I used 'sognante' and 'rilassato' for relaxed and dream-like, as well as 'vivace' for when the music is more lively and picks up in the chorus. Should I scrap this and use 'sotto' and 'con brio'/'vivo' or are these words fine to use?
#7
Quote by mickel_w
This is for a GCSE composition (schoolwork) and for some reason my teacher absolutely insists on using Italian terms… I've already annotated some of it (in pencil) before reading the 2 most recent posts, and I used 'sognante' and 'rilassato' for relaxed and dream-like, as well as 'vivace' for when the music is more lively and picks up in the chorus. Should I scrap this and use 'sotto' and 'con brio'/'vivo' or are these words fine to use?

For a real piece I personally wouldn't, but for an exercise it doesn't really matter. The best policy would be to ask your teacher what's acceptable.
#8
This is 20% of my final grade, my teacher is in hospital and we have 2 lessons left. When I asked her, her response was literally 'look it up on wiki or something'.

Would you recommend using the ones I've already used, or to change them to 'sotto' and vivo or con brio?
#12
Tranquillo (tranquil, calm)



This took google a few seconds to find with the search "Italian Musical Terms" Since your teacher likes Italian you might want to book mark it for future reference. Fairly pretentious on her part though since you could use your own native language to say EXACTLY the same thing. Though I guess when a lot of music is written that way convention has it's place. Regardless here's your link...
http://www.musictheory.org.uk/res-musical-terms/italian-musical-terms.php
Si
#13
I like all kinds of music except rap, and hip-hop. I just don't have anything in common with most rap and hip-hop performers. I've never shot another man, left him for dead bleeding in the street, stole his girlfriend, giving her both a disease and a baby, and went off to brag about it.