#1
Ok, so, whats the deal with these things? I watched a video on youtube and the guy had an unbounded hatred toward tune-o-matic bridges and recommended a roller bridge. I looked it up and they look just like tune-o-matic bridges but with little wheels in place of the beveled pieces that hold the strings in place. So do they actually provide much of a difference in things such as strings breaking, sustain, tuning, and anything else? Also, I see people with Bigbys using them more than anything with a tailpiece so if they are better, would you recommend to use one on a guitar used to play more modern rock music?
#2
They are better for vibratos because the strings aren't grinding against these sharp triangular pieces. For fixed bridges it's not that much of a difference. I've hear with them (especially on Kahlers) you need to put a bit of chapstick on the rollers to help keep it in tune.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#3
You've been watching too many Scott Grove videos.

I can see their usefulness if a guitar had a vibrato as well as a TOM, such as with a Bigsby, but without a vibrato? Nah. The strings themselves tend to somewhat 'lock' themselves into the bridge saddles when up to full tension, so rollers don't really provide much better tuning stability under most circumstances. As for breaking strings, it isn't the fault of the design, it's the fault of the way the saddle slots have been cut.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#4
^Exactly. Some of the larger rollers like you see on the nicer Gretsch guitars with factory Bigsby units are really nice and smooth, but the small TOM sized roller bridges have tiny little saddles and it's like trying to put a dump truck on skateboard wheels.

A properly cut TOM is perfectly fine, and with a TOM + Bigsby combo I've been using graphite saddles which are the smoothest drop-in TOM bridge I've used. Unless there's a good unit out there I'm not aware of I would not bother with TOM sized roller bridges.
#5
I have an Epiphone G400 SG with the tune-o-matic bridge and that end tailpiece thing. So I'm taking it that its not worth looking into?
#6
Quote by Curtis321
I have an Epiphone G400 SG with the tune-o-matic bridge and that end tailpiece thing. So I'm taking it that its not worth looking into?


Nah probably not.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#7
On a side note, If your strings are breaking at the bridge, you may have a burr on one saddle. Went through 3 bass strings before I checked it out years ago. Couldn't see it with the eyes, but there was a tiny burr on one saddle cutting into the strings.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#8
Every time I meet someone who wants to have a serious discussions about the issues with TOM bridges, they almost always suck at playing.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#9
Quote by JustRooster
Every time I meet someone who wants to have a serious discussions about the issues with TOM bridges, they almost always suck at playing.


I always love the "I don't suck, there's something wrong with my equipment" argument.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals