#1
I've been playing guitar for almost 8 years now. During those 7-8 years I've used a metronome 3 or 4 times. I aspire to be a lead guitarist of a band so I decided it was finally time to buckle down.

I knew I was sloppy but I didn't know it was this bad. During these past 2 days I've been working on several chromatic runs to develop "clean speed." It's like I'm starting over on lead guitar! I started at a very slow bpm and was having timing issues and shifting problems. They were mistakes I can't believe I was making. Today I realized that I was rushing myself and had to backtrack 30 bpm. I Know now that I have to pace myself. Is all of this normal for someone who rushed through ignoring sloppy playing?

Another question, does anyone have a strict regimen or practice routine that, when followed, would definitely have results? For example, I play a certain exercise perfectly "x" amount of times, then go up a certain amount of bpm. I've heard someone say that if they screw up 3-4 times on an exercise that they back track 1 bpm. I've recently been trying to play an exercise on a 1 min timer, then my mind starts to wander and I start screwing up. Maybe someone will fill me in on something to help my lack of focus.

ANY advice or practice routines would help me out. I can make my own exercises so that part is fine. It's the disciplinary portion of it. If I don't have a strict set of rules to follow, It will be easy to slack off or rush through things. Thanks people!
#2
Quote by Sir Stoney
Is all of this normal for someone who rushed through ignoring sloppy playing?


I would say absolutely. If you're used to having free reign and not paying attention to the steady beat, a metronome isn't gonna be a simple concept right off the bat. I was lucky to practice with a metronome when I first started out, so I guess I got lucky. Just keep hammering away at it and you'll pick it up, and trust me it's worth it.

I've heard someone say that if they screw up 3-4 times on an exercise that they back track 1 bpm.


If I mess up 3-4 times I'm dropping the tempo down a lot more than 1 bpm. The tricky part about using a metronome is to not play faster than you should be, which is something you'll figure out.

Another question, does anyone have a strict regimen or practice routine that, when followed, would definitely have results?


The only guaranteed results come from the effort you put in my friend. I can't tell you exactly what to practice, but I can say to practice what you don't know and not what you do know.
#3
Quote by Hardlycore
I would say absolutely. If you're used to having free reign and not paying attention to the steady beat, a metronome isn't gonna be a simple concept right off the bat. I was lucky to practice with a metronome when I first started out, so I guess I got lucky. Just keep hammering away at it and you'll pick it up, and trust me it's worth it.



If I mess up 3-4 times I'm dropping the tempo down a lot more than 1 bpm. The tricky part about using a metronome is to not play faster than you should be, which is something you'll figure out.



The only guaranteed results come from the effort you put in my friend. I can't tell you exactly what to practice, but I can say to practice what you don't know and not what you do know.


Thanks for the Reply man.
I know some exercises to work on, it's just the routine. How many times should I play something before I can speed up? Should I time myself to play a lick for "x" amount of time before I speed up? That sort of thing.
#4
Quote by Sir Stoney
Thanks for the Reply man.
I know some exercises to work on, it's just the routine. How many times should I play something before I can speed up? Should I time myself to play a lick for "x" amount of time before I speed up? That sort of thing.


Anytime dude. And I wouldn't really recommend the timing thing, as that can take away from the purpose of the metronome. It doesn't really matter how long you practice a lick or riff for, as long as you're super focused and strive for the best technique.

When you can play something cleanly and comfortably, you can bump up the tempo. It's when you notice your playing getting sloppy, or you start tensing up that you know you're playing too fast. Sometimes you don't even realize it, which is where the focusing and concentration comes into play.
Last edited by Hardlycore at May 2, 2014,