#1
Recently I have been trying to break out of using the standard chord shapes that I've learnt (major,minor,minor/major7th, dominant 7th, 5th). I've been experimenting with random shapes on the guitar and looking at what intervals I am playing to see what these new found shapes are called. I've followed chord interval charts which show the intervals for all sorts of chords but not always the one I am playing.

What I have noticed is sometimes when I play a chord shape that I think is not a well known one, I am actually just playing part of another chord and missing out certain notes, often the root. For example if I play a Dm7 on the fifth string, but miss out the root, why is this not now some sort of A chord? with [R m3 m6 oct] as the intervals? I know that when playing part of a chord the chord still keeps its name even if you omit the root but I cant for the life of me see why.

Is there a way to know that the chord you're playing is not part of some larger chord?
#2
If you're playing a Dm7 without the D, you're just playing an F major. I don't see any reason to call it a Dm7.

EDIT: Unless 1. another instrument is playing the D or 2. a D note has previously been played in a way that implies that the harmony at that moment is still a Dm7 chord.
Last edited by sickman411 at May 2, 2014,
#3
Quote by lodgi
Recently I have been trying to break out of using the standard chord shapes that I've learnt (major,minor,minor/major7th, dominant 7th, 5th). I've been experimenting with random shapes on the guitar and looking at what intervals I am playing to see what these new found shapes are called. I've followed chord interval charts which show the intervals for all sorts of chords but not always the one I am playing.

What I have noticed is sometimes when I play a chord shape that I think is not a well known one, I am actually just playing part of another chord and missing out certain notes, often the root. For example if I play a Dm7 on the fifth string, but miss out the root, why is this not now some sort of A chord? with [R m3 m6 oct] as the intervals? I know that when playing part of a chord the chord still keeps its name even if you omit the root but I cant for the life of me see why.

Is there a way to know that the chord you're playing is not part of some larger chord?



I think you bring up a good point, and its a good observation

A Dm7 is D F A C

Get rid of the root it's an F A C - F major

If its an A in the bass, its a F/A or F in 1st inversion.

I think the short answer is, it's good to have a strong handle on your triads so you recognize them immediately when you see those notes. Once you establish them, then the extensions/inversions become easier to spot and then you can tell what chord name is the most logical.

Best,

Sean
#5
By the way, always suspect 6ths in chords. It may well be that what you think is a 6th is actually the root and the chord is in first inversion.
#6
If I'm just messing around with chord voicings (meaning I don't have a progression yet), then I tend to think of a chord as having 2-3 potential names. I usually write down the notes of the chord and then "name" it when I have a full progression.

You have to be careful, though, with inversions. Depending on what the bass plays, it could change the context. You may think it's some really odd-ball chord. But then you mess around and find a bass note that sounds good with the chord, and...now your "odd-ball chord" is actually just an inversion. So, if your chord seems like it's Fmaj7#13b5 (or something equally oddly named), make sure it's not just an inversion.
#7
Quote by lodgi


Is there a way to know that the chord you're playing is not part of some larger chord?


yes….. learn all of the "standard" chords. Then you'll know if your new discoveries are really just the same ol standard thing that everybody else uses.

I was thinking of breaking out of using normal words when I talk, cause then I could convince myself that Im a creative genius. fricke tur shnickel.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 2, 2014,
#8
What I have noticed is sometimes when I play a chord shape that I think is not a well known one, I am actually just playing part of another chord and missing out certain notes, often the root. For example if I play a Dm7 on the fifth string, but miss out the root, why is this not now some sort of A chord? with [R m3 m6 oct] as the intervals? I know that when playing part of a chord the chord still keeps its name even if you omit the root but I cant for the life of me see why.

Is there a way to know that the chord you're playing is not part of some larger chord?


your discovering "voices" .. take the common D chord played on the second fret .. if you move each note a fret higher or lower it changes the "voicing" and may be named a completely different chord...move the F# lower it becomes a D minor or it could be "partial" voicing for an F6 ...or something in Bb.. depending on context...

if your serious about the endless wonders of moving voices and chords..learn the inversions of chords on all sets of strings in ALL KEYS...this along with the study of harmony will open a new musical universe to you...yes this will take some time but the rewards are priceless

play well

wolf
#9
Thanks for the replies people. I see this is a big subject and will take a lot of time to explore. I'll give the inversions a go, never bothered with them before.
#10
Quote by GuitarMunky
I was thinking of breaking out of using normal words when I talk, cause then I could convince myself that Im a creative genius. fricke tur shnickel.

As he grew...everyone noticed something different about the way Pootie would talk.

It baffled everyone, --doctors, scientists.

Let me break it down to you like this:

Pootie Tang is, was, and will always be...too cool for words.

Sa Da Tay!
Si