#1
Hello dear forum users.

I would like to get some advice from guitar wiring “experts” out there, because I want to do the following on my Stratocaster:

Wire a Series/Parallel 2DPT On/Off that allows me to switch between Parallel or Series in Positions 2 and 4. Also, I want a single Master Tone, Star Grounding and 50s wiring (tone after volume).

This is a schematic of the Series Parallel switch on a REGULAR strat:



But like I said, I wanna do it with a master tone, stargrounded and with 50s wiring. So I tried to “convert” the schematic and ended up with this:



Is my converted schematic correct? If not, can you “experts” give me any advice?

Thank you very much.
#2
Almost! You'll want to ground the tone pot to the volume pot, and the volume pot to the output jack ground. Usually you star ground everything to the back of the volume pot and then go from there to the trem ground. But that schematic is substantially correct if you just add that ground in.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
Almost! You'll want to ground the tone pot to the volume pot, and the volume pot to the output jack ground. Usually you star ground everything to the back of the volume pot and then go from there to the trem ground. But that schematic is substantially correct if you just add that ground in.

Thank you very much Colin. So you're saying I should do something like this and it would work?



Basically, all it was left was to ground the pots covering, as to "shield" the inside right?


Something is intriguing me though.

Why do the black wires (Ground) of the Bridge and Neck Pickups don't ever go to ground?

Instead, they go to the slots on the 5 Way Toggle Switch that usually connect to tone pots, and then they actually meet each other. Is this correct?

Notice how on the "regular strat" they actually reach ground through a capacitor, though that doenst happen on my schematic.
#4
It's late, someone else should double check that if they get the chance. But I think that's right.

Here's the simplified version without the switch. If you trace it all the paths should be the same with the switch in the down position.

#5
Quote by Roc8995
It's late, someone else should double check that if they get the chance. But I think that's right.

Here's the simplified version without the switch. If you trace it all the paths should be the same with the switch in the down position.



Thanks.

Just one thing, i don't know the "order" of the lugs in the 2DPT switch, i don't know when its facing foward or backwards. Does this matter?

If not, how can i discover the proper order of the lugs?
#6
As long as you have the usual Fender style open switch you'll know how it works when you look at it. Look closely at what contacts are made at each switch position. You'll figure out the pattern quickly. If you've got another type -


If you have one of those awful box-enclosed 10 lugs to a side jobs, throw it away and buy another one.
#7
Quote by Roc8995
As long as you have the usual Fender style open switch you'll know how it works when you look at it. Look closely at what contacts are made at each switch position. You'll figure out the pattern quickly. If you've got another type -


If you have one of those awful box-enclosed 10 lugs to a side jobs, throw it away and buy another one.


Thanks but i wasn't talking about the 5 way Pickup Selector switch I was talking about the Mini Toggle 2 DPT switch that i will use to switch between Parallel and Series wiring, not the Pickup Selector.

Does it matter the way the switch is facing? Cuz it's symetrical, impossible for me to figure out.
#8
The switch is symmetrical so it can be wired facing either way. The middle lugs are the poles and the outer lugs are the throws.

And just a little terminology correction, it's called a DPDT or 2PDT on-on switch, not 2DPT on-off. DPDT means double-pole double-throw and on-on means it is a 2-position switch that makes contact in both positions. On-off would mean it was a 2-position that only made contact in one of its positions. This can get a bit confusing though. For example, a Les Paul skeleton switch is classified as SPDT on-on-on (or SPDT center-on); it only has 2 throws but three positions.