#1
Right, new guitar (bought 3 months ago, virtually unused with the stock strings etc) and I get fret buzz on lowest string no matter how hard I press. With my 2nd finger it goes away, so do I just need to get my fingers stronger or is the action actually too low?
#2
The pressure you apply should not make a difference, so it is most likely the way the guitar is set up.
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#3
I had a similar problem with a few guitars i baught, there is definately a chance the action is too low. Usually in my guitar neck I like just a little curve in the neck, i find if the neck is TOO straight, then the saddles may need to be raised to silly heights. If there is a little tiny bit of a bow in the neck then you can lower the saddles a little. But its a give in take in this area.

One guitar i baught about 8 months ago, I found out after i baught it that the neck of the guitar was basically a busted unfixable neck. I brought it too guitar center and the guy there told me immediately to return the guitar. this is a rare situation, and even more rare for the guitar tech to actually admit the guitar is a faulty guitar and to return it.

so basically you can try adding a little bow to the neck, or raising that saddle at the bridge, to see if that fixes it. also a different set of strings may help in cases to eliminate buzz (different guages). Personally I like about Medium HIGH action, it really allows a more dynamic pick attack anyway. It could possibly be your finger but generally people shouldnt have to be pressing SUPER hard for fret buzz to go away, its EVERY fret on the lowest string? or just one or two?
#4
Quote by guitarjohn99
I had a similar problem with a few guitars i baught, there is definately a chance the action is too low. Usually in my guitar neck I like just a little curve in the neck, i find if the neck is TOO straight, then the saddles may need to be raised to silly heights. If there is a little tiny bit of a bow in the neck then you can lower the saddles a little. But its a give in take in this area.

One guitar i baught about 8 months ago, I found out after i baught it that the neck of the guitar was basically a busted unfixable neck. I brought it too guitar center and the guy there told me immediately to return the guitar. this is a rare situation, and even more rare for the guitar tech to actually admit the guitar is a faulty guitar and to return it.

so basically you can try adding a little bow to the neck, or raising that saddle at the bridge, to see if that fixes it. also a different set of strings may help in cases to eliminate buzz (different guages). Personally I like about Medium HIGH action, it really allows a more dynamic pick attack anyway. It could possibly be your finger but generally people shouldnt have to be pressing SUPER hard for fret buzz to go away, its EVERY fret on the lowest string? or just one or two?


Frets 4 and 5 low E and A. Strings are making contact with Frets 9 and 8. No other strings seem affected

Man if my neck is warped, I will not be pleased. Already had one guitar go that way to never be fixed

There's no truss rod to adjust. Maybe I should have just stuck to my old guitar. I didn't play the thing that much tbh
Last edited by epic FUZZ at May 4, 2014,
#5
What kind of guitar are we talking about here, Fuzz? Very few these days don't have a truss rod, most of those classical guitars.
Fret buzz is caused by the vibrating string striking a fret. That may be caused by the action being too low, the neck slightly warped, the guitar being too dry if an acoustic (causes the bridge to "sink"), etc.
None of this is un-fixable.
Some guitars which don't have a visible truss-rod opening on the headstock instead have the thing available inside the body of the guitar.
It's a pretty easy matter to replace the saddle if the action is too low.
Or, if it was in adjustment and is now not...You'd suspect humidity. Re-humidifyng the instrument for a week or two could put it right without any other adjustment.
#6
I have a brand new Fender acoustic/electric that had pretty much had a similar thing going on. When the E and A strings were fretted at the 9th fret, there would be a buzz. I took it in to have it looked at, and apparently the fret just needed to be pressed in a bit further. Nothing big. Good to go now.
#7
Quote by mcgoo26
I have a brand new Fender acoustic/electric that had pretty much had a similar thing going on. When the E and A strings were fretted at the 9th fret, there would be a buzz. I took it in to have it looked at, and apparently the fret just needed to be pressed in a bit further. Nothing big. Good to go now.


yeah, plan on taking it to a shop this weekend (if not this weekend, soon) to get it checked out