Page 1 of 2
#1
I never understood why people buy heads and cabs, surely it just makes it harder to lug around and store ... also in most gigging situations the amp is mic'd up so you don't need uberpower 100w amps ... (at least to all of the small gigs i've been too, i've never been to a 'big' gig)

Am i missing something here?
#2
Because you can mix and match heads and cabs.

Because combos are stupidly heavy.

Because normal people focus on the exact amp they want and don't concern themselves too much with the wattage.
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#3
Not counting in big 4x12 half stacks I'd rather split the load in two with head and cab than try to carry it all at once. (A tube 1x12 combo weights a ton, 2x12 combo MURDERS your back!)

Half stack is also customizable. Trying different head + cab combinations is a thing of its own. Also if you happen to find a cab you really like I say its going to stick with you for a long time and you can just keep changing (or collecting if you are a gear hoarder) heads, which often is cheaper than combos, if you so like. Heads are also easier to store in your closet than multiple combos if you want to own several of them.

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Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
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Bugera 333
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Line6 Pod X3
#4
I think the best of both worlds is a head with two 2x12 cans. You can fit it in the trunk of most sedans and it functions just like a 2x12 combo or a 4x12 stack, depending on whether you are running one or both cabs.
#5
Quote by Tcrumpen
I never understood why people buy heads and cabs, surely it just makes it harder to lug around and store ... also in most gigging situations the amp is mic'd up so you don't need uberpower 100w amps ... (at least to all of the small gigs i've been too, i've never been to a 'big' gig)

Am i missing something here?

moving my 4x12 and head is really easy, the cab rolls

Many amps are only available in 100+ watt heads, so to get those tones, you need a high powered amp

I also use a 4x12 as part of my "props" for gigging it looks more professional for the type of music I do.
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
Because a 412 cab sounds BIGGER than a 112 or even 212 combo. (And 212 tube combos weigh a metric shit-ton.) I also like how my 412 (slant cab) points the top two speakers right at my face when I stand 8-10 feet back. I can hear every nuance of my playing that way. There are also more tonal options available with a 412, considering that you can use a mix of speakers in an X-pattern or two of the same on the bottom, different on top, etc.

I use a dolly to move my 100+ pound 412 cab, and it's not a big deal at all. Carrying it up my stairs is another matter, but that's probably the longest flight of stairs I'll ever have to carry it up. Plus, 100 pounds isn't that big of a deal anyway. I've done far stupider things to my body with my landscaping business. I also used to do "buddy stairs" with a 275 pound heavyweight on my back in high school wrestling.

TL/DR: Grow a pair.
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Last edited by KailM at May 4, 2014,
#7
Because my back can't take lugging around a combo. When I was just 19, I collapsed carrying a 2x12 JTM clone around after a few years. Now, if its a combo, it never leaves the studio and must have wheels. IMO, getting a combo is asking for back problems.

Also, in some combos, the tubes rattle around and make noise.
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#8
Because you can mix and match heads and cabs.


IMHO, this is the best single reason.

I have a Fender HRD combo. I bought it for a lot of reasons, convenience among them. And it has been nearly everything I needed in an amp.

However, I fully admit that if I had bought them as a cab and head, I'd probably have Vox, Orange, and Mesa/Boogie heads right now as well. Maybe even something more exotic.
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#9
There are also people like me who use their amp as part of their instrument. To me an amp isn't just to get a nice tone and make a guitar louder, I use it to make the strings vibrate more to extend the sustain of the guitar. That's why I use a big amp - feedback.
I am using a combo nowadays but it's a big one (100W, 2x12, closed back, 90lb). I stick it on an angled stand so it is pointing at my guitar. In the past I used a 6x12 for the same reason. Both setups are very heavy which is why I use a trolley/dolly/handcart to move it around. To lift in on and off the stage I have bandmates and crew to help. Really, the weight is pretty irrelevant if you think ahead.

The big advantage of the head/combo arrangement is that you can easily change one part alone. You can own different heads and cabs and mix and match depending on the situation. Or you can upgrade just the part that you need.
Both setups have their pros and cons.
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#10
It's also cheaper in the long run, I mean sure it's expensive for your first head and cab but heads are normally cheaper than combos.
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#11
Also, there aren't many closed backed combos. A JCM800 combo sounds a lot different to a JCM800 through a closed back cab running the same speakers.
Really, there are a lot of factors that come into play when choosing one over the other.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#12
As previously stated, the heads with the 4x12s just sound bigger and better and look bigger and better. My Line 6 Spider Valve 2x12 combo weighs 60 pounds and that's one of the lighter 2x12 tube combos on the market. I was lucky it came with castors. Still lifting it into the trunk of my Mini is a pain in the ass when I go to band practice. I'd rather make the 2 trips carrying a head and a 2x12 cab.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
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Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
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#13
Quote by lemurflames
Because you can mix and match heads and cabs.

Because combos are stupidly heavy.

Because normal people focus on the exact amp they want and don't concern themselves too much with the wattage.


+3.1415 i mix heads and cabs, usually swap some speakers (in a 4x12" X pattern.

100 watts isn't audibly louder than 50 watts. mainly higher wattage gets you more headroom in some cases.

i own over a dozen tube amps and probably 9 cabs (2 are 2x12") all the others 4x12"

edit 8 cabs.
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Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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Last edited by trashedlostfdup at May 5, 2014,
#14
Quote by trashedlostfdup
i own over a dozen tube amps and probably 9 cabs (2 are 2x12") all the others 4x12"

You're amazing.

Or a madman.
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#15
Quote by lemurflames
You're amazing.

Or a madman.


closer to mad man. not being an ass, but here you go.





i also have a JTM45 clone that is having issues atm i am trying to figure out as well as a lee jackson ampeg, and i do have a SOVtek MIG50 that isnt' pictured.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#16
What's your favorite Mesa and your favorite Splawn out of what you've owned and tried?
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#17
Quote by lemurflames
What's your favorite Mesa and your favorite Splawn out of what you've owned and tried?


favorite mesa is the trem-o-verb. but its close.

the splawns are very different, the Promod (KT88) is really punchey and really strong in the higher mids. more trebel than i care for, but put it down to one and use the presence instead.

the nitro (also kt88) has a low mid hit. right in the nuts. trudging heavey.

both splawns are extremely clear even through tons of gain. neither are forgiving. at all.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#18
I don't own a car. So in the past I've tried to be courteous to whichever bandmates give me a ride and tried to keep my rig compact. A cab (I used a 112) takes up less space than a combo and there were times I just had my amp in my lap (just a rebel 20) so a head and cab works better in my situation.

Also. I had a Rebel 20 head and a cab at home, at the practice room and would often use someone else's cab. Much easier carrying around a...lunchbox, than a combo.

And the mixing and matching factor mentioned above.

Yet another example, I have a Randall RM20 combo. It only has 1 module slot. If I wanted 2 module slots I would have to get the RM22, which comes as a head only. If you want a Rebel 20, you'd have to have a cab (though the Rebel 30 comes as a combo). If you wanted a Blues Jr, you'd have to get a combo.

I prefer head/cab but I certainly don't mind if an amp I really want only comes as a combo, like the RM20 I just bought.
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#19
Quote by Tcrumpen
I never understood why people buy heads and cabs, surely it just makes it harder to lug around and store ... also in most gigging situations the amp is mic'd up so you don't need uberpower 100w amps ... (at least to all of the small gigs i've been too, i've never been to a 'big' gig)

Am i missing something here?


I play keyboards, guitars and bass, depending on the project. Sometimes a combo works well, sometimes I need more. For keys and bass, for example, I have 1500W (not a typo) amps that run either one or two 40-lb 900W cabinets, depending on whether I'm running DI or need to project from the stage. I'll use the same rig for guitar (with a modeler). All up, a head and a cabinet actually weigh less than the 100W open-back combo (1x12) I'll sometimes take to rehearsals.

I have four 4x12s that sit in storage these days, and that only come out when someone asks for stage decoration. It's only a matter of time before I dump them. In Los Angeles, these things are a couple of hundred bucks and have long since ceased to be important for a professional. They're more likely to be the sign of a newb band or a band that wants to look "period" -- '70's shows, etc. The manufacturers still promote them, of course, because they're cheap to slap together and easy to market.
#20
Quote by Cathbard
There are also people like me who use their amp as part of their instrument. To me an amp isn't just to get a nice tone and make a guitar louder, I use it to make the strings vibrate more to extend the sustain of the guitar. That's why I use a big amp - feedback.


You probably wouldn't last long in LA <G>. The sound guys would lock you out of the clubs. There are a whole lot of venues that really want to curtail stage volume, and I actually saw a big chunk of an audience get up and leave (some simply moved to the back) when a performer cranked up his 4x12 and launched into some guitar heroics in a roadhouse in San Juan Capistrano that also served food to stage-side tables. The management was not pleased and that guy has never appeared there since.

Most 4x12 jockeys don't realize they're beaming ice-pick treble to a small portion of the audience; they're onstage and off-axis and they think they sound great. Meanwhile, the sound guy's microphone, close-miked on a single speaker, is getting something different from what either audience OR guitar player are hearing. They don't care if you sound like crap because you don't know what a 4x12 does; they mostly just want to isolate as much stage noise out of the vocal (and other) mikes as possible. And that allows them to make the rest of the band sound better while you wank.

Feedback sustain can be done with a relatively small amp run closer up (I've done it with a 1x12 combo on an amp stand). But the truth is, that's what they developed sustainers for. I've got Fernandes (well actually Fernandes/Sustainiac hybrids) sustainers on several guitars, and the good news is that I can control them *without* an amp in the room at all. Between switching and a Sustainer Intensity pot, I can run sustain and octave-overlay feedback with nothing more than the guitar. I don't need gain, compression, delay or any of that. Just a long-lasting 12V battery. It opens a lot of doors sonically. I watched Adrian Belew running a Parker with Variax guts and a sustainer one night. Amazing combination of talent and electronics.
Last edited by dspellman at May 5, 2014,
#21
i'd rather lift two fairly heavy things than one really heavy thing

also a lot of amps are only available in head format
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#22
Quote by dspellman
Wall of text

I'll put my RM100 up against your sustainer doodad any day. Working feedback properly on a big amp is an art in itself. You can shove sustainers up ya bum. They're tofu turkey.


I played in one venue last year that wouldn't let me turn up loud enough to get proper feedback. We black-banned that venue, not the other way around. Venues like that can **** right off.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
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Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
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Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at May 5, 2014,
#23
Quote by Cathbard
I'll put my RM100 up against your sustainer doodad any day. Working feedback properly on a big amp is an art in itself. You can shove sustainers up ya bum. They're tofu turkey.


I played in one venue last year that wouldn't let me turn up loud enough to get proper feedback. We black-banned that venue, not the other way around. Venues like that can **** right off.


Dunno about things where you are, but "venues like that" are everywhere in Southern California and even in the Bay Area. That's a lot of "black-banned" potential income for musicians, then, in your bands.

I've watched backstage as Santana wandered around finding his "spot" -- the place where he would stand to get amp feedback just the way he wanted it. They'd mark it with tape and he'd make his way over to stand on that tape when he wanted to get what he wanted. It was a very late-'60's thing and a cool way to get "proper feedback."

The better guitar player in the band in those days was a guy named Neal Schon, a young burner who eventually founded Journey (along with some other Santana alums), HSAS, Bad English (with Jon Cain and Deen Castronovo, current long-term Journey members), Hard Line, Just If I, Soul Sirkus, Abraxas Pool, and who put out albums with Paul Rodgers and Jan Hammer and a bunch of others. He worked "proper feedback" on a big amp for years. But he doesn't rely on relic techniques to get his sound. He's touring these days with Axe-FX (he still has an array of 4x12s on stage that, he says, give him more of a feeling of playing in a room when he's doing the big arenas where sound goes out and never comes back, but actual stage volume on the Journey set is remarkably subdued; he has tinnitus) that run to the PA mixing board. He had the second Floyd Rose ever put on a customer guitar (EVH was first) and it was on a Les Paul. And he has " tofu turkey" Sustainers on most of his guitars, and has had for a long time.

Some other people use Sustainer Doodads (tofu turkey), too, including The Edge, Steve Vai, Adrian Belew, Marty Friedman, Paul Gilbert, Blues Saraceno, Kerry King, Steve Stevens, Rudy Schenker, Danny Lohnar, Andreas Kisser, Robert Fripp, Steve Lukather, Reeves Gabrels, Frank Marino, Joe Satriani, Synyster Gates, George Lynch, Kevin Codigan and a raft of others.
#25
Quote by dannyalcatraz


Cathbard's Cool. I've got no issue with him at all.

I know a WHOLE lot of guitar players who feel the same as he does, but in this town the sound guys rule a lot of the paying venues. I loved the days back in the Midwest when we pulled the flatbed into a farmer's field near a stream, tossed the beer into the stream to keep it cold, passed the word and put on a "kegger." Usually had a diesel generator to plug into and *suggested* that Daisy Dukes and cowboy boots were the ticket for reduced admission...

We'd occasionally have the local constabulary wheel up to make sure there weren't any underage folks in attendance (they were usually hunkered down in the cornfield when the cruisers rolled in). No one complained about the sound levels unless we had an atmospheric inversion layer happening, in which case we sounded like a loud radio playing next door, even though we were miles away.
#26
I think it's a difference in venue, really. Here rock and metal guys play at venues where the music is what people come for. In a bar situation or a restraint I can understand wanting to trim the volume, but the hard and heavy folks around here don't play those gigs. All my gigs have been at "clubs" but they are dedicated to the music, not to hanging around and chatting up the bartender or what have you.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#27
Quote by dementiacaptain
I think it's a difference in venue, really. Here rock and metal guys play at venues where the music is what people come for. In a bar situation or a restraint I can understand wanting to trim the volume, but the hard and heavy folks around here don't play those gigs. All my gigs have been at "clubs" but they are dedicated to the music, not to hanging around and chatting up the bartender or what have you.


Nope, sorry, it's not a difference in venue. I'm talking clubs where the PA system is sufficient to take out a couple of walls, and where hard and heavy folks play.

The sound guys may blast the living crap out of the patrons, the bartenders have earplugs and speak in sign language and point to drink menus and the subwoofers affect your breathing and maybe even your interest in using the rest rooms.

Stage volume is enforced at low levels because they're trying to keep stray noise out of the individual mikes (particularly the vocal mikes) because getting a lot of drums and random guitar/keyboard volume in them causes phase and other issues and makes things sound like junk.They say they have enough issues with hard walls and floors. I've played in bands that used IEMs and electronic drums, so that the actual stage volume approached zero (though the back wall bounce-back was probably seriously noticeable).

Typical club: House of Blues, Sunset Strip. Part of a hot chick review:

Sound is REALLY loud at this venue. I highly recommend NOT standing next to the large speakers on either sides of the stage because your ears WILL be hurting. However, if you can invest in some cheap earplugs, you'll probably be ok.

I like that this venue has pretty good ventilation. I had a really bad experience at HOB Anaheim because the ventilation there is terrible. I felt ok at this location! They have fans overhead that point straight at the floor and I could actually feel them! It was wonderful and much needed when you're packed like sardines on the floor.


Chatting people up is what the VIP rooms are for.
Last edited by dspellman at May 5, 2014,
#28
Sounds like a friggin nightmare. I'd be telling venue owners to shove their venue on a regular basis. Seriously, it's friggin rock band. If you can't handle the volumes of a rock band, don't book a ****ing rock band, douches.

I've spent decades perfecting my craft when it comes to feedback work. I don't care who uses sustainers or how good they are, they are no substitute for the real thing. You can't vary it like you can with the real deal. They are what they are and that's all that they are. I'm not abandoning all those years of work because some venue owner is a douche. **** him, **** his venue, and **** the horse he rode in on.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#29
Dude, it isn't like the Sunset Strip is an alien world to hard rock & metal bands.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#30
Btw, I do a similar thing to Carlos (Ted Nugent does that too) except I don't mark the stage, I just remember where to stand to get a particular type of sound.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#31
It's actually pretty common to either have a spot(or spots) on stage for just such a purpose.

And Kim Thayil is a master of setting up his Guild and amp juuuuust so that when he leaves it in place- in front of or on top of the amp- he gets an infinite feedback loop.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#32
Quote by dspellman
Nope, sorry, it's not a difference in venue. I'm talking clubs where the PA system is sufficient to take out a couple of walls, and where hard and heavy folks play.

The sound guys may blast the living crap out of the patrons, the bartenders have earplugs and speak in sign language and point to drink menus and the subwoofers affect your breathing and maybe even your interest in using the rest rooms.

Stage volume is enforced at low levels because they're trying to keep stray noise out of the individual mikes (particularly the vocal mikes) because getting a lot of drums and random guitar/keyboard volume in them causes phase and other issues and makes things sound like junk.They say they have enough issues with hard walls and floors. I've played in bands that used IEMs and electronic drums, so that the actual stage volume approached zero (though the back wall bounce-back was probably seriously noticeable).

Typical club: House of Blues, Sunset Strip. Part of a hot chick review:

Sound is REALLY loud at this venue. I highly recommend NOT standing next to the large speakers on either sides of the stage because your ears WILL be hurting. However, if you can invest in some cheap earplugs, you'll probably be ok.

I like that this venue has pretty good ventilation. I had a really bad experience at HOB Anaheim because the ventilation there is terrible. I felt ok at this location! They have fans overhead that point straight at the floor and I could actually feel them! It was wonderful and much needed when you're packed like sardines on the floor.


Chatting people up is what the VIP rooms are for.



I was speaking more towards the restaurants and coffee houses vs. actual places you go to see music, but what you have described is just absurd. I guess it is just the modern age, all the artifacts of rock are becoming obsolete.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#33
Quote by Cathbard
Sounds like a friggin nightmare. I'd be telling venue owners to shove their venue on a regular basis. Seriously, it's friggin rock band. If you can't handle the volumes of a rock band, don't book a ****ing rock band, douches.

I've spent decades perfecting my craft when it comes to feedback work. I don't care who uses sustainers or how good they are, they are no substitute for the real thing. You can't vary it like you can with the real deal. They are what they are and that's all that they are. I'm not abandoning all those years of work because some venue owner is a douche. **** him, **** his venue, and **** the horse he rode in on.


It's a good thing you're not from around here then. There are a couple of venues here that force bands to have their amps in an isolated room, and then you either need in-ear or they'll put you through the foldbacks, and these are the venues that cater to the hard rock/metal crowd, so the FoH is turned up loud enough to atomize a litter of baby kittens.

The sad truth is that in this town, if you don't keep a handle on your volume there's not a single venue that will take you. So tell them to **** off, but the only playing you'd ever do is in the rehearsal space.
#34
Quote by Cathbard
I don't care who uses sustainers or how good they are, they are no substitute for the real thing. You can't vary it like you can with the real deal. They are what they are and that's all that they are.


I've got to ask, have you used one?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#35
Quote by dementiacaptain
I was speaking more towards the restaurants and coffee houses vs. actual places you go to see music, but what you have described is just absurd. I guess it is just the modern age, all the artifacts of rock are becoming obsolete.

What artifacts are becoming obsolete? The venues are just as loud as they would be with un-miced instruments. The stage volume is only lower. Venues use PAs to give a consistent listening experience to everyone in the audience. It works for them and the band. If you're in the audience of an un-miced performance you might think they sound amazing because you're standing in the right spot. But it may sound like crap if you're standing in the wrong spot. Bands don't want people going around saying their performance sucked just because they were standing in the wrong spot and venues don't want a reputation for bands that sound bad. Why leave it up to chance when you can just use a PA and make the performance sound good for everyone. You don't understand the acoustics of the venue and you probably don't have the time to figure it out before the performance to properly set up so that the band sounds best. And even if you do that, the sound wouldn't be as well-dispersed as it would be with a PA. The PA and speakers are set up for the acoustics of the room, the stage location isn't.
Last edited by JELIFISH19 at May 5, 2014,
#36
I've yet to go to a venue around here that has really strict rules about stage volume. Half the bands I know around here are Doom/Sludge/Experimental metal type bands with one or two 100 watt half stacks per member.
#38
Quote by Arby911
I've got to ask, have you used one?
I've tried them. Not at a gig but I have tried them. They're ok I guess but no substitute for the real thing. Not the same thing at all.


The PA is there to push everything up to my volume. Isn't that how it works? It's the way it normally happens at the gigs I play anyway.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at May 5, 2014,
#39
Quote by Cathbard
I've tried them. Not at a gig but I have tried them. They're ok I guess but no substitute for the real thing. Not the same thing at all.


The PA is there to push everything up to my volume. Isn't that how it works? It's the way it normally happens at the gigs I play anyway.

Your a F-ing rebel Cath. I might be going to Au this year, if I do, I'll look you up if I'm in the area and we'll have a few brews
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#40
Any time, man.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
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