#1
Hello all,

I'm trying to understand all the EQ, compression, limiter stuff and I try to practice. So far, according to some google site, a good way would be, in order, to use for the track: 1) Reverb and other effetcs, 2) Some minor EQ to fix high pass filter 3) Compressor 4) Coloring EQ so the track sound stronger then 5) Limiter

Is this list ok? It's the right order?

I got some questions:

- Is that true that I must not use high pass filter on bass and drum?

- I just can't understand what is compression. My track usually just seem less strong, the volume is lower when I use it (Before mastering the volume is so low already : D) Any general tips on how I should use compressor?

- I usually use EQ to gain more volume, is it right or it's not supposed to be used that way?

- Should I follow all of these step for each and single tracks in the sound or only for master track (entire project)Or each tracks then on the master (entire project) at the end?

Thanks for the infos : D

All of this stuff is pretty confusing at the beginning!
#3
Man/Lady, do a little bit more research (Sound on Sound will help ALOT) and then start practicing with the idea's you have mentioned.

I'm not sure why one would use a compressor to just bring up the volume post EQ when you could just slide the fader up.
#4
There really aren't any rules. I usually do EQ and sometimes compression on the track (depending on the sounds in question), and everything else I do sends on.

Also, you can high pass anything you want. Again, there really are no rules.

Also this:
Quote by kahleesi
Man/Lady, do a little bit more research (Sound on Sound will help ALOT) and then start practicing with the idea's you have mentioned.

I'm not sure why one would use a compressor to just bring up the volume post EQ when you could just slide the fader up.
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#5
Reverb before EQ?
I wouldn't do that.

But that's just me; see, there's no rule, so learn how the things work and what they do, think about how you would use them, try them, and then try other stuff to see if it sounds better.
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#6
As an electronic artist, I mix, EQ, add effects, et cetera while I'm will in the process of writing the track. There's no particular order in which you have to do everything. Just experiment; once you have a better understanding of all the tools you have available to you, you'll be able to make judgement calls instead of just following a list. For example, here's the basics on compression; once you understand it, you should be able to use it more effectively.

First, you set a threshold frequency. For simplicity's sake, let's say your threshold is 1 dB. As long the track is making LESS than 1 dB of noise, the compressor does nothing. Once the track is producing MORE than 1 dB, the compressor will begin reducing the volume by whatever ratio you set. For example, let's say you have a 2:1 ratio, and your track is making 3 dB of noise, with a threshold of 1 dB. Since this is 2 dB MORE than your threshold, that 2 dB will be reduced to 1 dB (because of the 2:1 ratio; if it was a 4:1 ratio, it'd be reduced to .5 dB), making the track produce a TOTAL of 2 dB (your 1 dB threshold + your excess volume that is reduced to 1 dB).

Hope that helps.