#1
I don't know if it's too early for me to start learning this but I'm writing my own stuff nothing fancy but just spamming out chord progressions gets boring as I don't have a second guitarist to do this where's a simple place to start with learning little fills between chord changes. Even with something basic like G D and Em I can't do it it always sounds dodgy doesn't flow and sounds too countryish and cow boyish. What's an easy place to start because all the videos I look at are all hammer ons and fast scales between.

I just want something Simple to spice it up a little. And I can't get that sound they get where the chord still sounds as they do it mine goes quiet and I just hear the single notes that sound weird.

Any advice will be appreciated. Only playing since Xmas but I want to give it a go.
#2
Step one is "bass runs" to transition from chord to chord. Little descending or ascending single-note lines that take you from one chord to the next.

Using the same principal, you can construct chordal or part-chord runs playing a couple of notes at a time and used to transition... Or even played in the middle of a measure. These are normally referred to as "licks" in music slang.
Often, a song will have a signature "lick" that identifies it immediately.
I don't have any handy means to write any of this out, but you should be able to find dozens of examples on the web... Very basic stuff.
Also, look up "turnarounds". Again, short, partly-chordal runs to take you from one chord to another....Very common in blues.
#3
Yes bass runs good so are intro's. Go check out some beatles songs. Cheers
#4
"Passing notes", which are essentially additional notes played within the chord (usually with the 1st and 4th finger) are excellent fills especially when changing chord - I use them a lot. These can be 5ths, 6ths, 7ths, sus2, sus4 etc.

For example, a nice sequence (and one much favoured by Bob Dylan on many of his earlier songs) is a G, G6, G7 run:

G 320003
G6 322003
G7 323003

(This is easier if you play G with the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers, then use your 1st finger for the G6 switching to a D7 shape with the 1st, 2nd, 3rd fingers on the bass strings for the G7).

You can do similar things with suspended 2nds and 4ths:

A X02220
Asus2 X02200
Asus4 X02230

A 5th here and there is good:

C X32010
C5 X33010

G 320003
G5 320013 (or 330013 to be exact but most people just use the C on the 2nd string)


Experiment.
Last edited by Garthman at May 13, 2014,
#5
If you need something really simple try this strum

C 032010 ////
and then add a g with the pinkie
CaddedG 032013 //
DaddedG 000233 // (I think this is Dm7)
and return to
C ////

Try this 'G' note anchored with other chords like Em etc and as Garthman says experiment
#6
Quote by BassBen93
I don't know if it's too early for me to start learning this but I'm writing my own stuff nothing fancy but just spamming out chord progressions gets boring as I don't have a second guitarist to do this where's a simple place to start with learning little fills between chord changes. Even with something basic like G D and Em I can't do it it always sounds dodgy doesn't flow and sounds too countryish and cow boyish. What's an easy place to start because all the videos I look at are all hammer ons and fast scales between.

I just want something Simple to spice it up a little. And I can't get that sound they get where the chord still sounds as they do it mine goes quiet and I just hear the single notes that sound weird.

Any advice will be appreciated. Only playing since Xmas but I want to give it a go.


If you want easy, then Wish You Were Here from Pink Floyd is as easy as you'll find ( the intro).

If you're serious about learning good rhythm fills , then tackle this:

1) Jimi Hendrix - Castles Made of Sand, Little Wing, Hey Joe, Bold as Love, Wind Cries Mary : he's the master of fills, by far.
2) Neil Young ( though this may sound country-ish) - he's a great player in that style - see Needle and the damage done, which is a great tune to learn from a guitar standpoint.
3) Stevie Ray Vaughan - Mary had a little lamb - great place to start for funk blues - the tune can be played by itself.
4) Red Hot Chili peppers - Under the Bridge ( this is like "Hendrix light").