#1
How would I play like him/ what would I need to learn? Thanks.
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#2
No offense, but a question like this is almost laughable.

You might want to start with learning everything there is to know about blues, in particular American blues. So come back after a decade or two of playing blues and ask from there.

Unfortunately there is no magic scale or anything that will help you play like Stevie Ray Vaughan. Like seriously, watch him play live and if you still think there's a magic scale or technique or something that which will magically help you become like him then you're crazy.

Sorry if i came off dickish
Last edited by vayne92 at May 5, 2014,
#3
Yeah, I realized it was a stupid question but it gets to the point of it. What did he do to learn and be so good?
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This thread topic is gold. I've been on this website for 8 years and I've never come up with anything like this. So yeah. Great job TS[457undead].
#4
Quote by 457undead
Yeah, I realized it was a stupid question but it gets to the point of it. What did he do to learn and be so good?


He was a blues prodigy. He came as close as humanly possible to completely mastering the blues.
#5
Quote by vayne92
He was a blues prodigy. He came as close as humanly possible to completely mastering the blues.


But I don't get it, he was asleep in his theory classes and he still is one of the best blues players. There must be some way or theory lesson, right?
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This thread topic is gold. I've been on this website for 8 years and I've never come up with anything like this. So yeah. Great job TS[457undead].
Last edited by 457undead at May 5, 2014,
#6
Quote by 457undead
But I don't get it, he was asleep in his theory classes and he still is one of the best blues players. There must be some way or theory lesson, right?



SRV was overrated IMO he did nothing new just played the same old blues all I see him as is a blues musician with great chops lord knows the other blues artist had sloppy chops. I'll answer your question for you just learn the blues it's really that simple, but why would anyone want to play like Stevie when the majority of Texans copy him...

God knows we don't need another clone of the man it's irritating almost 90% of Texan guitarist sound like him. By the way all the theory in the world won't help you only a keen ear for transcribing things will most blues musicians don't know an ounce of theory they just figure things out by ear.




I must admit he did a pretty damn good job of imitating Albert king.
Last edited by Black_devils at May 5, 2014,
#7
Quote by 457undead
But I don't get it, he was asleep in his theory classes and he still is one of the best blues players. There must be some way or theory lesson, right?


just look up some blues theory. a lot of his songs are just more or less blues standards.

then it's just a matter of playing bluesy stuff over that (major/minor pentatonic, blues scale, mixing major and minor). again, you can look up theory lessons on blues guitar which will at least let you know what's going on theoretically.

if that sounds like i don't like him or am selling him short, i'm not. theoretically, his stuff isn't that complicated. playing like him, though... holy cack. he's awesome. get the basic theory under your belt and then start listening really hard. Or better yet do both at the same time.
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#8
Wanna play like Stevie? Buy the "Live at Mocambo" DVD and study that. When you can play everything on it with all the heart, soul, and sheer balls he had, you are ready. From a technical standpoint he wasn't doing anything new. From a "fully committed to the music" standpoint he is unrivaled. No one has come close since IMO but many have tried.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
He is improvising to his songs in his live performances, right?
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This thread topic is gold. I've been on this website for 8 years and I've never come up with anything like this. So yeah. Great job TS[457undead].
#10
Quote by 457undead
He is improvising to his songs in his live performances, right?


SRV, Jimi, and Jeff Beck never played a song the same way twice. It keeps the rhythm section on their toes and every performance is fresh.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
Lol @ the title.Haha.If only we all had the talent of our heroes.
Last edited by EyeballPaul at May 5, 2014,
#12
Learn a bunch of his songs, his influences' songs, and their influences' song by ear. Dissect everything they're doing. E.g. rhythm, harmony, scales, modes, phrasing, etc.

Then obtain the soul and feel to play in that style of music, which isn't really something you can practice so I hope you already have it.

If you're deadly serious, then that's what you have to do to play like SRV.
#14
Here's a clue - putting a left handed bridge on your guitar isn't going to help.
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#15
Quote by 457undead
How would I play like him/ what would I need to learn? Thanks.


Start by learning some Albert King solos ( he's one of SRV's main influences and his solos are very slow, so it's good place to start). Then try learning a few of SRV's easier songs - "Mary had a little Lamb" is probably the most accessible. "Tell Me" is pretty easy as well. Watch "Live at the El Mocambo" and pay close attention to how he strums ( even during solos) - that's probably the most important aspect of his technique.

The best way to learn to play like SRV is to learn some of his tunes. Theory isn't important with his approach, since he pretty much stays around the blues scale and pentatonic scales 99% of the time. It's all about the attack,the tone and being in the pocket.
#16
Quote by reverb66
Start by learning some Albert King solos ( he's one of SRV's main influences and his solos are very slow, so it's good place to start). Then try learning a few of SRV's easier songs - "Mary had a little Lamb" is probably the most accessible. "Tell Me" is pretty easy as well. Watch "Live at the El Mocambo" and pay close attention to how he strums ( even during solos) - that's probably the most important aspect of his technique.

The best way to learn to play like SRV is to learn some of his tunes. Theory isn't important with his approach, since he pretty much stays around the blues scale and pentatonic scales 99% of the time. It's all about the attack,the tone and being in the pocket.


Should I learn the 5 different blues scales also? Or just the first one?
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This thread topic is gold. I've been on this website for 8 years and I've never come up with anything like this. So yeah. Great job TS[457undead].
#17
Quote by 457undead
Should I learn the 5 different blues scales also? Or just the first one?


There's only 1 blues scale. I assume you mean the typical 5 positions of it in any given key? YES, if you're going to play and improvise like SRV you need to know that scale everywhere on the neck without even thinking about it.
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#18
Also remember your ears are as important as, if not more than, your fingers.

Too many guitarists get bogged down in the technical and worse, visual, aspects of playing the guitar that they actualyl forget to really listen to what they're doing.
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#19
Quote by 457undead
Should I learn the 5 different blues scales also? Or just the first one?


ideally all of them eventually, but position 1 will be good to start. you can get a lot of mileage out of position 1 of the minor pentatonic and blues scales. a fair proportion of classic solos are position 1 exclusively or mainly. just as one example, but a lot of the lead fills in crossfire are position 1.

and once you know it inside out you can actually concentrate on the feel, which is the main thing. maybe i'm just lazy/biased but i'd rather listen to someone who's stuck in position 1 but who can actually play and who has feel than someone who's flying about all over the place who doesn't.

pretty much what mark/seagull said, in other words
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#20
Lets say there is some sort of blues solo, do I google blues riffs or make my own?
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This thread topic is gold. I've been on this website for 8 years and I've never come up with anything like this. So yeah. Great job TS[457undead].
#21
bit of both... there are a lot of stock blues licks which are used a lot, but you sort of have to link them together and also pay attention to the backing to make sure they fit etc.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?