#1
Hi, I'm looking to buy a new guitar (emphasis on new, I want my own baby) and was looking for suggestions. I'm looking for a guitar that sounds a bit like a strat a la SRV and Hendrix but is also capable of sending out hard rock, crunchy tones like from Guns n' Roses, Zeppelin, and ACDC. Ideally it can churn out a metal tone too, but the electric blues is the most important part I'm looking at, with the hard rock second.

Currently I have a Vintage brand SG style guitar, which is a really good hard rock guitar but does not sound like SRV at all.

My budget is $600-800.

Thank you!
#2
maybe a tele in that price range. the tex mex pick ups (forget the model they're on but it's not a high high end} might work well. it seems like you're realy stuck between a strat and a les paul
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#3
As a whole, Reverend guitars are pretty tonally flexible.

If "electric blues" is your priority over "hard rock" the Double Agent (bridge HB and neck P90) has a lot going for it, but almost any of their P90 or standard HB guitars could probably do the job well. I'd also look for a used hardtail Rick Vito.

The Electra Omega and Omega Prime would also be a good option. Their HBs are voiced for classic rock, and sound nice when split.

Another option would be the Malden Karma or Bad Karma. Like the Electras listed above, they're both LP-style guitars with coil splitting. The Bad Karma's pickups are more aggressive.

One major option to consider is some kind of HSS guitar, of which there are many. There are HSS Fender Strats out there that would work, as well as Strat-clones from Godin (the Session and Progression lines), Fret-King, Fernandes, Dean Zelinsky Private Label and...well...pretty much everyone who makes a Strat-clone.
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Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
+10 on the Electra reference(even though it's not the same Electra).

The vintage Electras are freakin' stellar guitars. Never tried the new Electra......yet.
#5
I have an Omega Prime. It's a sweet LP-clone, no question.

FWIW, the new company is owned by some industry vets who bought up the original company's brand, trademarks, and IP.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Yeah, that's what I've been hearing. I'm just so glad they've brought the name back along with the quality it represents. Plus, values of the vintage ones should go up.
#7
Superstrat of some description- either HSS or HSH. If SRV and Hendrix are more important, HSS. If Slash's lead tones are more important, HSH.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#8
PRS SE CU24 with coil taps
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#9
Kramer Assault. LP Body/Strat Style Neck. HH configuration but I think they've been previously made avail as HSH or HSS configs.
#10
single coils for SRV or you won't really get that sound. if you have a Vintage SG that will cover many of the tones you mentioned so why not get a strat for the rest. keep in mind that a jack of all trades guitar will be a master of none. I also have a Vintage SG which will certainly get you ac/dc and zep and even to a fair degree G&R.
#11



Fender Deluxe Lonestar Strat. Texas Specials in the middle and neck, JB in bridge. $600 brand new. Killer deal.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#12
Reverend makes the Gil Parish sig: HSH w/Wilkinson.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
I hate 70s head stocks, but I'd hit that.
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Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#14
An HSS Strat is, as previously mentioned, your best bet. I can get a decent rock tone from my SSS American Standard. Just roll back the tone to about 7 on the bridge pickup and flip it to the bridge pickup position.
2004 Fender American Standard Stratocaster 1994 Ibanez RG270 1970's Hondo Les Paul 2011 Epiphone Sheraton II 1990's Kit Built Telecaster 2005 Ibanez AW40NT 1949 Harmony Sovereign
#16
Quote by monwobobbo
single coils for SRV or you won't really get that sound. if you have a Vintage SG that will cover many of the tones you mentioned so why not get a strat for the rest. keep in mind that a jack of all trades guitar will be a master of none. I also have a Vintage SG which will certainly get you ac/dc and zep and even to a fair degree G&R.


I missed where he said he had an SG Yeah if it has that and likes it then a strat would be a good idea to get those srv and hendrix tones.

I'm not sure I'd totally agree that a jack of all trades guitar will be a master of none (you could make a pretty decent case that nowadays superstrats are so ubiquitous that they're almost a classic guitar design in their own right, and for some music styles like 80s hard rock/metal and instrumental they're arguably the ideal type of guitar), but I know what you mean all the same, and agree in this specific case, considering he already has a humbucker guitar and wants those strat tones.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#17
Quote by Dave_Mc
Superstrat of some description- either HSS or HSH. If SRV and Hendrix are more important, HSS. If Slash's lead tones are more important, HSH.


If I've got to cover both with a conventional (non-Variax) guitar, I'm going with an HSH guitar. In particular, I've got a couple of Carvin superstrats (25" scale, 24-fret, neck-through) that have mahogany body and neck with a maple cap (immaterial, that last, but tossed in).

The pickup and control setup is important. I have a master volume, master tone, a five way and three miniswitches. Two of the miniswitches do nothing more than split the coils on the humbuckers.

When split, the coil closest to the bridge on the bridge pickup is left active and the coil closest to the neck on the neck pickup is left active. Some manufacturers do just the opposite, which makes little sense to me.

With the coils split, the five-way acts exactly as it does with any strat. If you have humbuckers (particularly the bridge pickup) with pretty good output, you'll have a very good approximation of a strat. I'd suggest a Carvin M22SD or a Suhr Aldrich in the bridge.

The third miniswitch is a "bridge pickup add-in" switch. Its main function is to add the bridge pickup to the forward position (neck only) on the five-way. This gives you the equivalent of the LP pickup switch's middle position.
#18
Thanks for all the suggestions! Yeah my SG style guitar does suit the hard rock stuff pretty well, I'm going to look at the Super Strats and the Deluxe Lone Star Strat, both seem pretty close to what I'm searching for.
#19
Quote by monwobobbo
single coils for SRV or you won't really get that sound. if you have a Vintage SG that will cover many of the tones you mentioned so why not get a strat for the rest. keep in mind that a jack of all trades guitar will be a master of none. I also have a Vintage SG which will certainly get you ac/dc and zep and even to a fair degree G&R.


^Pretty much this if you want to do it right. SSS Strat for SRV + Jimi, and your SG for the rest.
[..BLACKFIRE..]
#20
Quote by Dave_Mc
I missed where he said he had an SG Yeah if it has that and likes it then a strat would be a good idea to get those srv and hendrix tones.

I'm not sure I'd totally agree that a jack of all trades guitar will be a master of none (you could make a pretty decent case that nowadays superstrats are so ubiquitous that they're almost a classic guitar design in their own right, and for some music styles like 80s hard rock/metal and instrumental they're arguably the ideal type of guitar), but I know what you mean all the same, and agree in this specific case, considering he already has a humbucker guitar and wants those strat tones.


80s hair metal is a superstrat for sure. that makes it the ideal guitar for that. while an HSS or HSH guitar can cover a lot of ground they won't nail the total single coil sound. while some have come reasonably close that's it reasonably close. good enough sure a master no. duplicating the Strat or LP sound seems to be a holy grail for guitar makers but unless it's pretty much a straight copy they seem to come up short. my BC Rich Eagle does a pretty good LP imitation but doesn't nail it good enough for my needs yes but I doubt any regular LP user is going to switch over. while I agree that good enough in many cases is just that for certain tones you really would be best off using the precise gear.
#21
Quote by JustRooster



Fender Deluxe Lonestar Strat. Texas Specials in the middle and neck, JB in bridge. $600 brand new. Killer deal.

Its not a JB its a fender twin head humbucker.
#22
I think you would also do well to try out a JTV-69 Variax or JTV-89 Variax. Very nice, great necks and build quality is top notch. They have as much flexibility as you want.

I have the non-trem JTV-59 and won't part with it. They are good guitars and well priced.
#23
Quote by monwobobbo
80s hair metal is a superstrat for sure. that makes it the ideal guitar for that. while an HSS or HSH guitar can cover a lot of ground they won't nail the total single coil sound. while some have come reasonably close that's it reasonably close. good enough sure a master no. duplicating the Strat or LP sound seems to be a holy grail for guitar makers but unless it's pretty much a straight copy they seem to come up short. my BC Rich Eagle does a pretty good LP imitation but doesn't nail it good enough for my needs yes but I doubt any regular LP user is going to switch over. while I agree that good enough in many cases is just that for certain tones you really would be best off using the precise gear.


Waaaal...

I'd have to say "not so." Drop a set of Duncan P-Rails into an HSH guitar along with the bridge add-in switch and what's missing? Just make sure that the rail coils (which are real single coils) are close to the bridge and the neck, respectively, and you're there for the strat. Switch to humbucker mode and you've got the LP done pretty well on my mahogany body maple top neck-through. And then you've got the benefit of the P90 coils as well. On a 25" (as opposed to a 25.5") scale guitar, you're pretty darned close to at least some of the more-than-100-models of LP (and pickup varieties) that Gibson has tossed at the market
#24
Quote by deano_l
I think you would also do well to try out a JTV-69 Variax or JTV-89 Variax. Very nice, great necks and build quality is top notch. They have as much flexibility as you want.

I have the non-trem JTV-59 and won't part with it. They are good guitars and well priced.


I'm using the new JTV-89F.

Honkin' guitar.

Strat, LP, Tele and 335 models are absolutely bang-on. High tweakability using the Workbench software available (free) for it.

I've rattled on about it elsewhere in these forums.
#25
Quote by monwobobbo
80s hair metal is a superstrat for sure. that makes it the ideal guitar for that. while an HSS or HSH guitar can cover a lot of ground they won't nail the total single coil sound. while some have come reasonably close that's it reasonably close. good enough sure a master no. duplicating the Strat or LP sound seems to be a holy grail for guitar makers but unless it's pretty much a straight copy they seem to come up short. my BC Rich Eagle does a pretty good LP imitation but doesn't nail it good enough for my needs yes but I doubt any regular LP user is going to switch over. while I agree that good enough in many cases is just that for certain tones you really would be best off using the precise gear.




I'd say an HSS strat should get pretty close to strat tones, at least for the middle, neck, and middle+neck tones. But yeah the bridge and bridge+middle won't be exact.

As usual, it just depends on what you want/need and what you're willing to compromise on and what you aren't.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at May 9, 2014,
#26
Quote by dspellman
Waaaal...

I'd have to say "not so." Drop a set of Duncan P-Rails into an HSH guitar along with the bridge add-in switch and what's missing? Just make sure that the rail coils (which are real single coils) are close to the bridge and the neck, respectively, and you're there for the strat. Switch to humbucker mode and you've got the LP done pretty well on my mahogany body maple top neck-through. And then you've got the benefit of the P90 coils as well. On a 25" (as opposed to a 25.5") scale guitar, you're pretty darned close to at least some of the more-than-100-models of LP (and pickup varieties) that Gibson has tossed at the market


good approximations yes nail it no. tried the P-rails and thought they were a very good pickup for a jack of all trades guitar. sound just like a strat no. slanted bridge pup on strats gives somewhat different tone than a straight one. huge difference no but still there (something often missing from those trying for the Hendrix sound as his bridge pup was backwards). I've had many superstrats over the years as well as other guitars and sorry but if you want a true strat sound then single coils in that configuration is the best way to go. for good enough then sure your approach is one of the best.