#1
I'm using the intro to sweet child of mine as a finger exercise and to learn to have better control of both hands. It is still a difficult riff for me to play.
I'm curious about the rhythm - i was learning from a tab that showed it as an even rhythm throughout but it doesn't really sound right when i play it that way.
(On those rare occasions when i can manage to play it cleanly all the way through)

I guess it looked like 8th notes on a 4/4. Being a tab I found on the internet it didn't have all of the notations. Since i'm not a total dummy i did find a video that showed slash's fingers as he played.

It seems to sound better when you let certain notes ring out more than others and I'm wondering if there's a slight "gallop" as well? It's so hard for me to hear that I am afraid that I might be hearing things.
#2
it's just played in straight quavers (8th notes). As for letting notes ring out, it's down to how you want it to sound, I think Slash holds the root notes for a little longer than he does the others, but you should be able to listen to it and get the feel for it, try playing along to the song and you'll get a better feel for it.
#4
Quote by paul.housley.7
I'm using the intro to sweet child of mine as a finger exercise and to learn to have better control of both hands. It is still a difficult riff for me to play.
I'm curious about the rhythm - i was learning from a tab that showed it as an even rhythm throughout but it doesn't really sound right when i play it that way.
(On those rare occasions when i can manage to play it cleanly all the way through)

I guess it looked like 8th notes on a 4/4. Being a tab I found on the internet it didn't have all of the notations. Since i'm not a total dummy i did find a video that showed slash's fingers as he played.

It seems to sound better when you let certain notes ring out more than others and I'm wondering if there's a slight "gallop" as well? It's so hard for me to hear that I am afraid that I might be hearing things.


Use your ears and stop analyzing the tab/notations. Try to imitate what you hear - that's how you learn rock/blues guitar. There is way more going on with timing and feel than what you can represent with traditional notation or tab.
Last edited by reverb66 at May 7, 2014,
#5
You are correct it is a straight 8th note pattern in 4/4. If it sounds wrong when you play it that way, your timing may be off. I hate to give this advice because it's so damn boring but you could try practicing with a metronome.
#6
It's a riff good for practicing. I agree with it being played by feel and that certain let ring is better using your ears to get spot on.
Don't worry if you can't get it exact as a beginner, playing the 8ths correctly is plenty good and will help your playing in other areas. You get more finesse as you become more experienced.

You think slash was thinking "OK I wanna hold this first note for just an extra 32nd and the 5th for a dotted 16th" when he was playing? It's not like that and even if a tab had noted these details accurately it wouldn't do much good. One of the downfalls of using mainly tab is that robotic type of playing many get, focusing too much on the numbers/notation rather than the actual music.
Have fun
#8
Quote by cdgraves
There might be a slight bounce to the rhythm, but it's definitely 8th notes.


Yeah, that's what i was going to say- little bit of a lilt (that's a term, right, and not just a northern irelandism? ) maybe but straight 8th notes all the same.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Quote by reverb66
Use your ears and stop analyzing the tab/notations. Try to imitate what you hear - that's how you learn rock/blues guitar. There is way more going on with timing and feel than what you can represent with traditional notation or tab.


Well, we all don't have ears like EVH and need a little help. Tab has allowed the guitar to be more accessible and more guitar players can't be a bad thing, right? While I agree that all of our ears need training I don't agree with how much tab gets crapped on. I would never had stuck with the instrument in the beginning if it weren't for tab. Is it a shortcut? Sure. That said, it's a means to an end.
#10
agreed.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
Quote by deepfat
Well, we all don't have ears like EVH and need a little help. Tab has allowed the guitar to be more accessible and more guitar players can't be a bad thing, right? While I agree that all of our ears need training I don't agree with how much tab gets crapped on. I would never had stuck with the instrument in the beginning if it weren't for tab. Is it a shortcut? Sure. That said, it's a means to an end.


I was really just referring to the rhythm aspect. There's nothing wrong with learning with tab, especially solos and other riffs that lend well to it and that are too difficult to decipher. Loose chord strumming like in Sweet Child of Mine does not translate well into tab and can end up over-complicating what is actually a simple part if you listen to how it's being played rather than try to subdivide it meticulously with notation. The example in this thread is spot on because the OP is being confused by a discrepancy between what he is seeing on paper and what he is hearing - when in doubt, trust your ears.

Learning by ear is a skill that can be developed and that greatly simplifies learning any song. Tabs are helpful to learn something more quickly, but they are still cheat sheets and if you solely rely on them it will show in your playing. Learning songs by ear is the first step to improvising and composing your own songs - playing what you hear in your head. It's not nearly as difficult as people make it out to be, you just need to do it one note at a time. Eventually you can pick up a song in seconds after hearing it.

All that being said, I've learnt many things with tab and it definitely serves it's purpose. It does make guitar playing more accessible and certainly makes learning more technical things much quicker. It's a great tool for beginners to get them started, but it should be looked at like training wheels in the long run.
#12
also agreed

(though i'm lazy and still use tab a lot )
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#13
Quote by reverb66
I was really just referring to the rhythm aspect. There's nothing wrong with learning with tab, especially solos and other riffs that lend well to it and that are too difficult to decipher. Loose chord strumming like in Sweet Child of Mine does not translate well into tab and can end up over-complicating what is actually a simple part if you listen to how it's being played rather than try to subdivide it meticulously with notation. The example in this thread is spot on because the OP is being confused by a discrepancy between what he is seeing on paper and what he is hearing - when in doubt, trust your ears.

Learning by ear is a skill that can be developed and that greatly simplifies learning any song. Tabs are helpful to learn something more quickly, but they are still cheat sheets and if you solely rely on them it will show in your playing. Learning songs by ear is the first step to improvising and composing your own songs - playing what you hear in your head. It's not nearly as difficult as people make it out to be, you just need to do it one note at a time. Eventually you can pick up a song in seconds after hearing it.

All that being said, I've learnt many things with tab and it definitely serves it's purpose. It does make guitar playing more accessible and certainly makes learning more technical things much quicker. It's a great tool for beginners to get them started, but it should be looked at like training wheels in the long run.


I get what you're saying, and for chord strumming I totally agree. However, the intro lead riff to Sweet Child is not like this. That part is straightforward 8th notes, no variation whatsoever.