#1
Hi guys I used to play bass a few years ago back when I was at school (not very well) and recently started playiy again about a week ago,I just need some tips really and where to start and good things to learn and play? I'm currently able to play some green day,some blink 182,mcr,pink floyd.
Last edited by TanVonVanity at May 7, 2014,
#2
I'd start by learning the basic major and minor bass scales/chords. When I started playing bass at the age of 13, I was self-taught and played a lot of punk-rock and pop-punk. But at the time I was learning I was playing a lot of Blink and other pop-punk music, and I as I progressed and starting writing my own stuff I thought to myself "Wow, I don't know much!" So if I were you, I would start learning the basics and go from there. The only upside of playing that kind of music as a beginner would be getting strumming patterns down with a pick. Once you start getting better you'll learn that playing basically 4 notes the entire song gets pretty boring.

If you like Taking Back Sunday, their bassist kinda mixes things up and some of his lines are "fun" to play. Teenage Riot by The Ataris is a fun one to play too. And anything by Rancid and Anti-Flag.
#4
the blink stuff is pretty good for starting out. i took up bass recently alongside guitar and was definitely playing it...
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
Yeah like I said, I started playing bass by learning Blink. Pretty simple lines and I actually used a lot of Blink songs when I was learning how to stay on rhythm with the drums. Definitely good lines to practice if you're just starting off. Then as I got better, I started putting in my own lines and fillers that sounded good. Music is like anything else, you learn from the basics and keep progressing!
#6
All the stuff I'm playing I'm finding easy.i think mostly I need to work on timing .getting faster and my techniques.
#7
Timing is really key. Even the simplest bass lines can sound bad if you're timing isn't tight.

IF you are up for it, start listening to some blues. The format is simple enough chord wise and it really will help your ear and your playing. Early R & B is good for learning to play in the pocket and lock with the drummer. I developed my groove by listening and playing along with Motown, Stax and Blues records. Early tight punk bands will do the same. Also check out some Fugazi--every alt rock band bass player should rip to "Waiting Room " at least once in their life

Go for accuracy and timing before you go for speed. A former member of this forum once said that speed is the byproduct of accuracy. Start slow and build up from there. Play something not until you get it right, but until you can't get it wrong.

Get a metronome or a drum track and play with it. Just you and the click or drum loop will really help you listen to what you are doing.

Record yourself playing. Its not always comfortable to do this but it will help you hear what is solid with your playing and what needs work.
#8
Spend a little bit of time getting to grips with the "Funk Formula". (Try and overlook the cheese-factor, you'll have to get used to it for some of the more enjoyable bass material).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHE6hZU72A4

Once you've got to grips with that, practice listening to any old isolated drum beat (you'll find plenty on youtube) and picking out the kick drum. Practice just playing an open note whenever the kick hits. Lock in with it. Become one with the kick.

Then try practicing to a metronome (this bit's less interesting but vital nonetheless). You don't need to do anything fancy. Just practice simply playing a note each time the metronome clicks, and seeing how long you can stay in time to it/come in precisely on the beat. You can also try dropping it out for a few bars and continuing to play - try and stretch the length of time you can stay exactly on time without hearing the metronome.

Practicing just these few things regularly will drastically improve your groove, feel, and timing - the difference between passable bass playing and great bass playing in any musical scenario is usually the groove and timing.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
#9
I agree with everything said thus far. My own .02¢ is to work on both your fretting hand AND playing hand. You want to build dexterity/endurance on your fretting hand, so chromatic ascensions and descents will be super helpful.

While you work your fretting hand you also want to make sure the hand plucking the strings (or strumming) is muting the other strings not being played. It may not seem like much, but if the other strings aren't muted then they'll still resonate and muddy up your tone. The best way to do that is just to practice; slow at first until you have full command over both your hands.

Lastly, and most importantly, LEARN HOW TO ARPEGGIATE CHORDS! Learning arpeggios, their inversions, and which notes make up which ones, is tantamount to understanding your role as a bass player and maximizes your comfort with the neck. Furthermore, in addition to learning scales, I highly recommend learning all of the modes as well (Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian). Once you learn the modes your overall voicing will get better and your playing will too.
#10
If you want to play faster, more smoothly, and get better at timing, then you need to practice with a metronome. Practice scales and modes, as well as string-skipping and chromatic exercises; bumping the speed up constantly. The results will amaze you.

Somewhere in the world, Jeff Berlin is shrieking at the top of his lungs because I said that.

But it is true.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#11
Jeff says "timing is internal..a metronome won't improve your timing!!"

However, we don't play in a vacuum. Practicing with metronome teaches you to anchor your timing to external source. Much like you will have to do with other musicians, esp. drummers!
#12
Thanks for all the tips guys,much appreciated ,luckily my husband is a drummer so il have to play along with him :p
#13
^Bass players with drummer husbands are awesome.

My husband is also a drummer; we've been a few bands together as well.
#14
Good choice on Green Day, I think Mike Dirnt is a very underappreciated bassist, a lot of his early and mid-90s work is actually pretty freaking amazing. Once you get more technical, I suggest looking into 70s prog bassists like Geddy Lee and Chris Squire, their work is excellent and will almost leave you dissatisfied with most other music...
#15
Yeah I'm no bassist but dirnt seems pretty good. I got the greenday bass tab book 'cos I was hoping it was fairly simple (and also stuff I enjoy playing) and yeah. it wasn't.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#16
Quote by Dave_Mc
Yeah I'm no bassist but dirnt seems pretty good. I got the greenday bass tab book 'cos I was hoping it was fairly simple (and also stuff I enjoy playing) and yeah. it wasn't.


Despite being a bit overplayed, I still maintain that "Longview" is a great bass line.
#17
yeah. most of them that i can think of offhand are pretty good.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#18
If you want something that you can play almost immediately (and have fun doing it), try Punk tunes. Anything by The Ramones, for instance. And the pace of the songs will definitely help teach you to keep up to speed.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley