#1
I want to know if there is a certain order I should learn things of music theory. Like first learn the notes of each major scale, then memorize those major scales' relative minors, then learn the 1-4-5 chord progressions for each of the major scales etc.?

I'm asking because in order to get certain things down, you need to know certain other things first.
#2
Circle of fifths, relative minors, triads, 7th chords, harmonic minor and melodic minor, learn all chords up to a 7th on each degree of the scale, modes of the major scale, learn order of modes for each key signature, learn the chords up to a 7th on each degree of the scale. That'll give you a good basic understanding for music theory knowledge.
#3
I would separate modes out and learn them later, honestly.

Anyway, I would learn the following in and out:
Intervals (names and sounds)
Scale formation
Diatonic chords
Relative major and minor keys
Chord progressions and how they create and resolve tension
Chord extensions


You really need to learn harmonic function, which is what all of those things will teach you.

www.musictheory.net is a good starting point. Others might have some book recommendations for you.
#4
1. Musical alphabet (The names of the 12 notes and their enharmonic equivalents)

2. How the major scale is constructed.

3. Intervals

4. Basic chord construction (the four triads)

5. Harmonize the major scale - Chord function and Roman Numeral analysis

The list could just keep going but those are probably the first five things you want to learn and in that order.
Si
#5
Quote by KillerPhail
I want to know if there is a certain order I should learn things of music theory. Like first learn the notes of each major scale, then memorize those major scales' relative minors, then learn the 1-4-5 chord progressions for each of the major scales etc.?

I'm asking because in order to get certain things down, you need to know certain other things first.



I'd say start on the notes of music first, as far as alphabetic letters.

Then the major scale, how to spell every note correctly, and chords of the diatonic major scale.

Then try to learn all the notes that make up general chords, like B minor B D F# etc.

That's a pretty good initial start on theory, and basic major chord and scale related items. Especially since you're self-guiding your exploration.

Best,

Sean
#6
I'm not sure there's any set order to learn it in, to a certain extent you sort of have to tailor it to yourself depending on what type(s) of music you're interested in etc. And I'm sure different teachers (and books etc.) will teach it slightly differently.

That being said,

Quote by 20Tigers
1. Musical alphabet (The names of the 12 notes and their enharmonic equivalents)

2. How the major scale is constructed.

3. Intervals

4. Basic chord construction (the four triads)

5. Harmonize the major scale - Chord function and Roman Numeral analysis

The list could just keep going but those are probably the first five things you want to learn and in that order.


that looks like a good list (that's more or less what sean said, too, so +1 on his suggestion too- though personally I'd say that learning the intervals in chords is probably easier than learning the notes because you only have to learn one thing- and once you know it you can work out the notes in the chords).

crazysam has some good stuff there but it might be a little complex at first. by that i mean a fair bit of it is probably beyond me, and while theory isn't exactly my strong point, i think (think ) i'm slightly past the beginner phase, too.

regarding books, i'm starting to sound like a broken record here, but i found the complete idiot's guide to music theory pretty good- starts at the start but isn't patronising. musictheory.net is great (and you can't argue with the price), but from the little i looked at it I thought it got quite complicated quite quickly, it didn't exactly spoon feed it to you...
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#7
Quote by 20Tigers
1. Musical alphabet (The names of the 12 notes and their enharmonic equivalents)

2. How the major scale is constructed.

3. Intervals

4. Basic chord construction (the four triads)

5. Harmonize the major scale - Chord function and Roman Numeral analysis

The list could just keep going but those are probably the first five things you want to learn and in that order.


Great list.
#8
Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina is good. It goes through everything and has ear training exercises for it all too.
#9
Ok thanks everyone. Over this past week I've been learning piece by piece the things I want to know. How I'm learning is I'm picking something I want to know and so I make flashcards for it and just go over them a couple times a day and then whenever I'm playing guitar I incorporate whatever I'm going over into my playing. First I went and memorized the relative minors (Like A Minor is C Major, E Major is C# Minor, etc.). Then I made flashcards for each major scale and now I know them all by heart. Right now I'm learning the I-IV-V-vi for each major scale/key so if someone says "play something in A Major" I can give them a chord progression.

At the same time I'm trying to memorize the frets/notes on the guitar for the strings other than the E string.

I will look at that music theory site that was linked and I will look up Fretboard Mastery.
Last edited by KillerPhail at May 11, 2014,