#1
I see and hear many players saying things like "I tried such-and-such guitar or amp and I didn't do anything for me". Maybe I'm an old fogy who thinks that you need to work for things, but that attitude seems to me to be demanding that the instrument provide some kind of instant gratification, and is simply wrong.

I have two guitars that I bought new quite a few years ago and when I first played them I thought okay, these aren't bad but nothing special. But I was wrong. They are special. They sound wonderful and play well.

Some of you will be thinking "but you have just become used to them". We'll yes. That's my point. Instant gratification would have said to leave them, but because I persevered with playing them, I have now come to love them.mI love their tones and fee. They are now part of me.

I have to ask those who play a couple of chords on something before rejecting it out of hand... "What the Hell are you looking for?".

Maybe if those people were told "no, that's your guitar and amp now for the next five years", then they would come to love them.

Perhaps the old adage of keep trying instruments until you find one that clicks is wrong, and you have to just work at the relationship between you and your instrument.

I think folk should stop constantly chopping and changing guitars and amps in the vain hope some magic happens, pick a decent instrument, stick with it and learn to play it. Who knows, you may be happy for the rest of your lives.
#2
k thx
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#3
i often think the same thing too. playing guitar is not natural, and there is no guitar that is especially suited for anyone.

but, i think if i was less frugal i would not be thinking this way.
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#4
Who still says fogey? (which, btw, is spelled with an e like that)
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
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#5
Quote by TheStig1214
Who still says fogey? (which, btw, is spelled with an e like that)


Mostly people who really don't think they are one.

I have to agree with the basic premise, though. I had a guy glance at my old Pod XT once and do one of those, "Oh, I tried one of those in Guitar Center once. Modeling really isn't ready yet." I played, he changed his mind. He asked me what I'd done to modify it. "Nothing," says I. "You don't judge these things by the presets. You need to do a bit of learning and a bit of tweaking, and you need to spend some time with it."

I've heard a lot of, "You have to play a lot of guitars and then pick the one that speaks to you." There are certainly guitars I think are cool, but I'm pretty much convinced that the people who wait for one to speak to them don't know how to set up guitars (or how to at least recognize when one has been set up well). Most of my guitars have been purchased used and/or ordered online or sight unseen. A few of the ones I own now weren't set up well when I got them, and I'm grateful for that because they were passed over by others. Some tweaking, and some time spent with them and they became golden.

Ditto amps. The more versatile the amp, the more I appreciate it. I'm so not a fan of one-trick ponies in either amps OR guitars. Artistic visions change, or you just get flippin' tired of the same thing over and over. I won't even look twice at an amp whose sole mission is distortion (ineptly named hi-gain in some cases). Thus my interest in modelers and things like the Torpedo C.A.B.
#6
I would agree to an extent, but on the other hand there are some guitars I pick up that don't feel right. I could drill it down and be like the neck is too thick and isn't comfortable, or the way it hangs on a strap doesn't feel natural, or all kinds of little minor nit-picky things. As an example, I recently discovered that I HATE the way PRS SE Custom 24's feel - something about the heel and the feel of the neck, but I couldn't even pinponit exactly what about it I didn't like. I'm sure if I didn't have a choice it would feel natural over time and I might even grow to love it, but with the option to go to a guitar that is more comfortable/natural in my hands, I'd absolutely go to that instead with the choice. The time I would have spent familiarizing myself with the PRS I could have just played the guitar that was already a good fit and made more progress as a player.

On the flip side, I like amps that make me think and work for it a little bit, because I think it keeps me from becoming lazy and makes me find new tones and sparks my creativity.
#7
Quote by deano_l
I see and hear many players saying things like "I tried such-and-such guitar or amp and I didn't do anything for me". Maybe I'm an old fogy who thinks that you need to work for things, but that attitude seems to me to be demanding that the instrument provide some kind of instant gratification, and is simply wrong.

I have two guitars that I bought new quite a few years ago and when I first played them I thought okay, these aren't bad but nothing special. But I was wrong. They are special. They sound wonderful and play well.

Some of you will be thinking "but you have just become used to them". We'll yes. That's my point. Instant gratification would have said to leave them, but because I persevered with playing them, I have now come to love them.mI love their tones and fee. They are now part of me.

I have to ask those who play a couple of chords on something before rejecting it out of hand... "What the Hell are you looking for?".

Maybe if those people were told "no, that's your guitar and amp now for the next five years", then they would come to love them.

Perhaps the old adage of keep trying instruments until you find one that clicks is wrong, and you have to just work at the relationship between you and your instrument.

I think folk should stop constantly chopping and changing guitars and amps in the vain hope some magic happens, pick a decent instrument, stick with it and learn to play it. Who knows, you may be happy for the rest of your lives.

I've never bought a guitar that I didn't like the way it played, IMO that is just stupid if you do it.

I have certain tastes, wants and needs and I will buy gear that fits this. I like having a variety of guitars and amps to use, why does this make me bad?

What's wrong with customizing your gear?

I get the feeling you just cant or don't want to afford some gear. Or you don't like people who can.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#8
I would agree to an extent, but on the other hand there are some guitars I pick up that don't feel right.


Ditto that.

Fenders and Gibsons just don't feel right to me. It's no one thing I can point at, really, but a combination of elements that just turn me off. Its one of the reasons it took me so long to buy an electric- I'm in Texas, and Fenders and Gibsons are as common as blades of grass, so finding something else was tricky.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
Quote by Robbgnarly
I've never bought a guitar that I didn't like the way it played, IMO that is just stupid if you do it.

I have certain tastes, wants and needs and I will buy gear that fits this. I like having a variety of guitars and amps to use, why does this make me bad?

What's wrong with customizing your gear?

I get the feeling you just cant or don't want to afford some gear. Or you don't like people who can.



I love rich people! I want to be one. I CAN afford good gear, no worries about that my friend. I'me self employed and doing pretty well (six figure UK GBP per annum).

Cost of gear is irrelevant. I see plenty of people claiming they didn't get an immediate connection with X guitar, where X is anything from a Squier to a Suhr.

I don't like people who have no patience; who expect instant gratification; who are not prepared to PLAY but prefer to constantly buy and sell. It seems that for some people the AQUIRING of gear is more important than playing, and in order to justify it they invent weak excuses based upon some mythical "lack of connection". Perhaps they are more talented at commerce than playing the guitar.

The value of the gear is irrelevant. If I went out tomorrow I could buy myself a US PRS and it wouldn't cause my family to go hungry. I have no need of a new guitar but if I did I wouldn't let lack of immediate gratification put me off buying one. They are good solid guitars and I know that whichever one I buy I will keep it for years rather than hours/days/weeks/months, and that I will get used to it and come to love it.
#10
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Ditto that.

Fenders and Gibsons just don't feel right to me. It's no one thing I can point at, really, but a combination of elements that just turn me off. Its one of the reasons it took me so long to buy an electric- I'm in Texas, and Fenders and Gibsons are as common as blades of grass, so finding something else was tricky.


But if you had to buy a Fender and had no choice but to keep it for 10 years, how would you feel about that guitar after those 10 years?
#11
Quote by deano_l
But if you had to buy a Fender and had no choice but to keep it for 10 years, how would you feel about that guitar after those 10 years?

Well, honestly, you never HAVE to buy a Fender, even if it is the only electric guitar brand available. You can always opt not to buy an electric guitar...which is exactly what I did for over a year. You can build your own, like Brian May did. Etc.

Assuming, arguendo, that I did buy a Fender despite not liking it because I wanted to play electric guitar that desperately, I can guarantee you that as soon as I found something I felt suited me better, I'd buy it.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#12
Good post, thanks.

I've got all sorts of conflicting opinions on this, no black and white. On the one hand, neck widths and profiles bother me not in the least, from classical to skinny Ibanez, but unsuitable set up does. So the only thing in "feel"for me is set up.

Poor sound, however you want to describe it, discourages me from playing. I didn't take up electric until I had been playing acoustic for over 30 years, because I failed to appreciate the importance of pickups and amps, and I didn't like the sound I was getting. Now I have a decent amp, and I've turned into an obsessive pickup tinkerer. I hardly ever play the damned things because I'm too busy mucking with them. OTOH, although I'm primarily an acoustic guitarist with some fairly decent gear, I could be happy with the majority of well-set-up acoustics these days. - The sound has become a lot less important than the notes/fingers.
#13
Quote by deano_l
But if you had to buy a Fender and had no choice but to keep it for 10 years, how would you feel about that guitar after those 10 years?


Honestly, you seem like you're a little angry about something other than what you're saying exactly. Some people like buying, selling and trading gear - there is nothing wrong with that. Trying something new isn't a sin or a character flaw, either, if someone doesn't stick with a guitar then they have every right to get a different guitar. You're boiling this down to character flaws and negative things - so whatever trip you're on, I hope you work it out.
#14
Do lefties go through this constant "flipping" process? I would asume that the pool of guitars they are able to selct from is much smaller, consequently they will trade less and play the same guitar for longer.

If they can do it, why can't right-handed guitarists?

(I am right-handed for the record)
#15
Quote by katalyzt13
Honestly, you seem like you're a little angry about something other than what you're saying exactly. Some people like buying, selling and trading gear - there is nothing wrong with that. Trying something new isn't a sin or a character flaw, either, if someone doesn't stick with a guitar then they have every right to get a different guitar. You're boiling this down to character flaws and negative things - so whatever trip you're on, I hope you work it out.


Thank you for your post. In the same vein I could claim to have hit a nerve with a few posters.

Are you a better trader than player perhaps?
#16
Quote by deano_l
Do lefties go through this constant "flipping" process? I would asume that the pool of guitars they are able to selct from is much smaller, consequently they will trade less and play the same guitar for longer.

If they can do it, why can't right-handed guitarists?

(I am right-handed for the record)

Because we don't have to

Most people I know that are lefties learn to play right-handed because there are more options available.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#17
Quote by deano_l
Thank you for your post. In the same vein I could claim to have hit a nerve with a few posters.

Are you a better trader than player perhaps?


Haha, my main guitar has remained the same for a long time, and so has my amp, but I absolutely trade secondary guitars and bass guitars a lot. I don't trade much, but I'm a horrible player, so yeah, I'm probably a better trader than player.

I guess I hit a nerve, huh? Because your veiled insults about people in general seemed to have turned into a straight up personal attack.

I'll reiterate that people have the right to trade out different equipment and it isn't any type of character flaw. Trying to label it as such is preposterous.
#18
Actually, I don't trade or sell. Except for my very first acoustic, which I played to destruction, I own every guitar I've ever bought since 1988...in the low 20s, now.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#19
lol nice opinion there bud, thnx 4 sharing!


reported lol
banned
Last edited by deadsmileyface at May 7, 2014,