#2
as vague and newbish as the OP's post is, I too am struggling with ear training. I don't know where to begin sometimes. I'll hear something I love and say to myself "ok, I am going to learn this by ear because it will make me better in the long run as opposed to learning the tab". And I have absolutely no way of even starting to try it. How in the hell did people learn everything by ear 20-40 years ago? Is it literally just sit there until you find it?
#3
Try using the functional ear trainer (miles.be) and start by transcribing SIMPLE stuff.

I mean like transcribe three blind mice, happy birthday and other very simple one line melodies until you get that down. Then try stuff with another voice or two, like tetris, mario etc...

After doing this for a while, if you go back to a song you were struggling to transcribe you should find it's now a lot easier. If it's just too fast to hear the notes, try using that music slower downer program (I've forgot the name sorry, it was in some regular posters signature).
#4
Quote by tyle12
as vague and newbish as the OP's post is, I too am struggling with ear training. I don't know where to begin sometimes. I'll hear something I love and say to myself "ok, I am going to learn this by ear because it will make me better in the long run as opposed to learning the tab". And I have absolutely no way of even starting to try it. How in the hell did people learn everything by ear 20-40 years ago? Is it literally just sit there until you find it?


It's actually very simple. I learnt my first solo by ear when I had been playing for about a week. It took me about 8 hours to learn 10 seconds of very simple blues/rock soloing, but that experience was invaluable. I can now learn most things almost instantly after hearing it - though I've been playing for 20 years...

First - ensure your guitar is in tune with the music! Then take each note or chord one at a time and try to find the notes on the guitar. You need to play and rewind over and over until you get it right. Then move to the next note or chord. It's a trial and error process at the start - keep hitting notes until you find the right ones, then move to the next. Don't worry too much about whether you're playing something the "right way" in the right position - just make sure your playing the right notes ( things can be played a million different ways on a guitar) . It's a painstaking process at first and should take you enormous amounts of time for simple riffs and solos, but the experience is invaluable because it will eventually translate into you being able to play things you hear in your head ( improvise, compose etc.). Eventually you'll be able to learn songs just by hearing them, almost instantly. It also helps with memorization and technique.

Once you've deciphered the song, compare what you learnt to the tab or a video of the actual person playing the song or riff and correct any mistakes or omissions. Keep doing this regularly, in conjunction with learning some things with tab or notation, and you'll be getting the best out of your song learning time.
#5
Iv found the best way is to start by just learning songs by ear and playing along. Helps your technique too.
But yeah, start with simple songs, ACDC are pretty good to start with, not Mr farking Brownstone or Nightrain like this mug here B-)
#6
Quote by Anon17
Try using the functional ear trainer (miles.be) and start by transcribing SIMPLE stuff.

I mean like transcribe three blind mice, happy birthday and other very simple one line melodies until you get that down. Then try stuff with another voice or two, like tetris, mario etc...

After doing this for a while, if you go back to a song you were struggling to transcribe you should find it's now a lot easier. If it's just too fast to hear the notes, try using that music slower downer program (I've forgot the name sorry, it was in some regular posters signature).


Since I started learning (2 years ago), I've always used Transcribe! for playing along, slowing down and repeating small sections over and over...just love this software

http://www.seventhstring.com/xscribe/overview.html
#7
Quote by bobduff80
Hi could anybody tell me the best methods for ear training?


Learn lots of songs….. play alot…… listen.

seriously

some things are more simple and obvious than we would expect.
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
Learn lots of songs….. play alot…… listen.

seriously

some things are more simple and obvious than we would expect.


+1.

the trial-and-error method works but it takes longer and it's ultimately less effective. do things with the intent of bolstering your aural capabilities rather as opposed to taking the "sit down and keep flinging shit at the wall to see what sticks" mentality.

in addition, sing through whatever you're playing. ideally all of it. learning lots of songs is important. playing a lot is important. listening is extremely important. but singing will expedite your aural skills. if you play a song on your guitar, you're able to cause the sound, but through an external means (i.e. the guitar). you need to internalize the sound, so that you can cause it even if you didn't have the instrument.

you might be able to play the riff to day tripper on a les paul custom, sure. but can you sing it accurately in the precise key without hitting a wrong note? are all of your notes precise -- none sharp, none flat? that sort of thing.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Quote by bobduff80
Hi could anybody tell me the best methods for ear training?

Learn songs and some theory to describe what it is you hear, which will help make sense of everything.

Interval training, and gathering associations of songs for intervals. For example, first two notes of this song:

minor 6th/aug 5th

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t30E6QR6qtU
#10
Transcription, academic-style ear training, and attentive listening.

Transcription is really valuable to helping you work on your instrument. It's a slog, for sure, but will help you develop ears, technique, and repertoire. You'll probably start with a guess-and-check method, but improve over time such that you can repeat entire phrases after a couple listens.

Academic-style ear training means doing dictations and sight singing. Teoria.com has some dictations. You basically listen to a melody/progression and try to figure it out without using an instrument. Sight singing is really good, too, because you have to know what intervals and rhythms sound like in order to sing them by just looking at the music. This is how they train your ears in music school, and most people with a BA in music have really good ears. It's a really hardcore approach that will push your ears beyond your instrument and help your overall attention and listening abilities.

And attentive listening is just what it sounds like. Turn on the radio in your car and see how much you can figure out while it plays. You'd be surprised how quickly you get to identifying common chord progressions and rhythms.
#11
The best way I have found to train your ear is by using an interval trainer. You can find them free online. The trainer plays two sets of notes and you have to tell it what the interval is between the two notes.

Another great way to train your ear is to listen to songs on the radio and figure out the songs key, chord progression and leads. This method is for more advanced guitar players.
#12
French school fixed-do solfege

Literally anything else is going to be half-assed

Look up Danhauser and Modus Novus
Last edited by bassalloverthe at May 8, 2014,