#1
Hi forum ears been trying to find out if there are any online arpeggio finder or apps where I can just key in the first 3 notes and it will tell me what the arpeggio is?
#4
I'm no theory expert, but three notes wont do i t, I think. The other notes that come in a scale sequence dictate the type of arpeggio. I might get hammered on this, but think I'm right. There are good apps out there to show arpeggio construction but three notes , I dont thnk, is enough to dictate what arpeggio your looking for. Diminished, major, minor, within 3 notes the scale and therefore the arpeggio is not apparent. Anyone else got anything to add? Dont mind being corrected at all, it just helps me learn. I think you need to know what scale you're in to help you find the associated arpeggios, maybe actuially what chords, your working with. anyone, Bueller, bueller, ....
#5
Cetain notes, if not linear, might hint at what arpeggios your looking for. But they wont necessarily be the right arpeggios.
#6
Quote by pushingthrough
I'm no theory expert, but three notes wont do i t, I think. The other notes that come in a scale sequence dictate the type of arpeggio. I might get hammered on this, but think I'm right. There are good apps out there to show arpeggio construction but three notes , I dont thnk, is enough to dictate what arpeggio your looking for. Diminished, major, minor, within 3 notes the scale and therefore the arpeggio is not apparent. Anyone else got anything to add? Dont mind being corrected at all, it just helps me learn. I think you need to know what scale you're in to help you find the associated arpeggios, maybe actuially what chords, your working with. anyone, Bueller, bueller, ....

3 notes would work for triads. Any regular major, minor, diminished, suspended, or augmented chord is a triad. (On guitar, we simply double up on certain notes sometimes because we have six strings, and it makes a chord sound fuller.) If the chord is an extended chord, such as one of the types of 7th chords (including 9ths and 13ths), a 6th chord, an add chord (add9, add11)...then you obviously need more than 3 notes. That said, there are a lot of arpeggio shapes which are traids; however, there are also many shapes which are extended chords. So, naturally, a good app would probably account for more than 3 notes.

Quote by pushingthrough
Cetain notes, if not linear, might hint at what arpeggios your looking for. But they wont necessarily be the right arpeggios.

This depends entirely on how the app is designed.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at May 9, 2014,
#7
Ok the chord arpeggio I am looking for is an A, D and F#. That's not a major not a minor nor is it a diminished. Is there a reverse arpeggio list I can check against this? Or someone please?
#8
Quote by Atomant2304
Ok the chord arpeggio I am looking for is an A, D and F#. That's not a major not a minor nor is it a diminished. Is there a reverse arpeggio list I can check against this? Or someone please?

Actually, that looks like an inverted D chord to me. This also called a slash chord, because it indicates that a note other than the root note is in the bass. Example: D/A is how you would name this particular chord.

At least, that's my gut instinct. I don't think there's many situations where this arpeggio wouldn't act as D chord.

Edit:
@cdgraves:
All due respect, I don't know that he has the theory backing yet to figure it out. So...
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at May 9, 2014,
#10
Quote by Atomant2304
Ok the chord arpeggio I am looking for is an A, D and F#. That's not a major not a minor nor is it a diminished. Is there a reverse arpeggio list I can check against this? Or someone please?


That's a D Major arpeggio with starting note being A. Its a D Major arpeggio in 2nd inversion.

Learn chord theory first, and then apply how those chords function and are formed to arpeggiation in sweeping or fingerpicking.

Read through this site, its useful for beginner theory.

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/42
#11
Quote by Life Is Brutal
That's a D Major arpeggio with starting note being A. Its a D Major arpeggio in 2nd inversion.

Learn chord theory first, and then apply how those chords function and are formed to arpeggiation in sweeping or fingerpicking.

Read through this site, its useful for beginner theory.

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/42


Wow a D major!?!?!?!? Good lord thank you for the short and concise answer. There's no way I could've finger that out myself without going through a whole lot of trouble. Thank you my friend.
#13
Quote by Atomant2304
At least now I know that wasn't a dumb question.


Lol it's really simple how they did that man. It's just about knowing how chords are constructed, and also know the names of the notes.

D Major contains the notes D (Root note) F# (Major third) and A (Fifth). If the notes were in the order F# A D it'd of been a D Maj 1st inversion. And starting on A, that's the 2nd inversion, like Life Is Brutal said.
Last edited by Hardlycore at May 10, 2014,
#14
Mhmmm. Now, check out those musictheory.net links I and Life Is Brutal gave you. Learn about chord construction.
#15
At least now I know that wasn't a dumb question.


Its not a dumb question, just a simple one.

If you learn the construction of chord types it gets really easy, so I'd suggest learning how they're made and how they function. There are plenty of sources online for it and its really useful to learn.
#16
Quote by pushingthrough
I'm no theory expert, but three notes wont do i t, I think. The other notes that come in a scale sequence dictate the type of arpeggio. I might get hammered on this, but think I'm right. There are good apps out there to show arpeggio construction but three notes , I dont thnk, is enough to dictate what arpeggio your looking for. Diminished, major, minor, within 3 notes the scale and therefore the arpeggio is not apparent. Anyone else got anything to add? Dont mind being corrected at all, it just helps me learn. I think you need to know what scale you're in to help you find the associated arpeggios, maybe actuially what chords, your working with. anyone, Bueller, bueller, ....



I disagree. Usually Arpeggios begin on the root, but if not, a cursory understanding of triads, should suffice.

I think about the day I demystified Eddie Van Halen's Eruption to a student in one day, after I taught him how to name every triad instantly.

We had A C E tapping which was easy to spot as Am, and then it went to A C F, which he immediately recognized as an F/A arpeggio.

Three notes of an arp, and chord naming mastery will give you almost every other piece of information that you need, as long as you are aware of the key, the bass line, etc. Extensions are just that. You can build those intervalically off the triad and identify what they are doing.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at May 11, 2014,