#1
Hi,

lately I've been practicing a sweep picking etude from lick library's essential practice routines: sweep picking. (the intermediate example by Andy James) and full speed it's 160bpm, lately i've only broken about 120bpm when practicing. And I've only been practicing the first like 4 measure of this entire etude because I need to be able to get it up to speed.

I wanted to know though if anyone has had consecutive practice sessions where one session, your on fire, building speed rapidly with no mistakes. Then you have sessions where you have the same lick you practiced the day before but it sounds like garbage. Last night I practiced the lick and was doing fine! this morning I woke up and went to practice it again and wasted a full hour stuck at 80bpm because my I kept making mistakes!

I always start by playing this lick slow, like around 70bpm and building up. Because i'm still in school, I can usually only do this and hour at a time except weekends. So sometimes i'll get from 70 to like 102 and still feel like I could do more, but can't.

has anyone experienced anything like this? does anyone have any tips for me to practice better? thanks for the input!
#2
Oh ALL the time man. You just gotta take it for what it is and keep trying to improve. There will be many days where everything's moving along and others where you wanna throw your guitar through the window. (Don't do that)

Quote by McZaxon
I always start by playing this lick slow, like around 70bpm and building up. Because i'm still in school, I can usually only do this and hour at a time except weekends. So sometimes i'll get from 70 to like 102 and still feel like I could do more, but can't.


This usually gets rid of the sludge for me. What I mean by that is if I feel like I'm just sloppy at a higher tempo, I'll drop the tempo way down and work my way back up. It's usually pretty uncomfortable at that super slow tempo, but that's the point. You need to fine tune everything and gradually work your way up.

If 70 bpm isn't slow enough to clean everything up, drop it down even more to 50-60 bpm until you know you're playing it clean.
#3
It happens, that's why you have to make sure that on those "off-days" you bring the tempo down and still practice it perfectly. It is even more important to do this on the off-days than on the good days, cause (in my opinion) you are only as good as you are on your bad days. Or atleast that is what i tell myself to make sure i slow down and get things right.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#4
Because you are a human being and not a machine.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
There are too many reasons that are too detailed to list why that is happening. Personally I do not think it is a good idea to take the approach of start slow go faster until reaching 99999 bpms. That way of thinking sort of distorts the view of music. But hey, if it works for other people great. It just may not be the best approach for you to take.
#6
When I am tired I usually have bad sessions. Lately I've been on a better diet and sleep schedule which has cut my bad days almost in half. Keeping a healthy mind and body is more important to learning guitar than some may think. But in the end, off days are very common you just have to be happy with your abilities on those days (as limited as they may be).
#9
Quote by tappooh
Yeah, I just went through an entire "off week". I was absolutely terrible, as if I suddenly had lost 3 years worth of practice.



I know how this feels you've come 1000 foot steps forward to go back 10,000 foot steps backwards.. It's apart of the processes don't let it get you down bro.
#10
Quote by reyyourock
When I am tired I usually have bad sessions. Lately I've been on a better diet and sleep schedule which has cut my bad days almost in half. Keeping a healthy mind and body is more important to learning guitar than some may think. But in the end, off days are very common you just have to be happy with your abilities on those days (as limited as they may be).



I agree guitar is more mental than physical just having a negative day could really put you in a bad mood which will affect your guitar playing.
#11
Quote by steven seagull
Because you are a human being and not a machine.


No, I'm a machine!