#1
I've been learning all the main chords. I have all the major and minor shapes memorized, so I just need to practice moving between them. What group of chords should I learn next, sevenths? Is there a group of chords for blues. Also, what should I do to learn how to put chords together, chord scales? keys? circle of fifths?
#2
Most folks tend to pick up chords as needed, and then they just go into the memory bank. It's perhaps more important to learn chord theory, so you know how they are constructed. Then when you see some unusual symbol like B-flat augmented flat 5th.... You can pretty easily figure out what would go into making such a thing.
There are many thousands of possible chord voicings when you start throwing in all the inversions and the oddities of the guitar's fretboard layout.

A lot depends on what you're playing; you'd sound pretty funny trying to throw a lot of jazzy voicings in to some folk or bluegrass tune.
#3
^ Yeah.

For major blues you normally just use dominant 7th chords. E.g. E7, A7 and B7 for a I, IV V progression in major blues.

Maybe learn some of the extended chords in the open position.

Then learn barre chords since you can learn a ton of chords really quickly that way as they're movable around the neck. And are normally based on the open position chords, too.
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#4
Quote by bryan.bailey.39
I've been learning all the main chords. I have all the major and minor shapes memorized, so I just need to practice moving between them.
Keep in mind that when you know a D major open chord, there are many other chords you can form from it: D major, D7 (Dom 7th) Dmaj7, D6, Dsus4, D minor, D min7th, Dadd9 no 3rd.

As someone has already suggested, this is where chord construction theory comes in handy.

In the case of my example of D major open, you either put down a finger here, put one there, maybe lift one up over there. But in my example, you never have to move more than one finger, away from the basic D shape.

You do however, have to know what note, or "degree" of a chord, (1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, sus4, etc), is under which finger when you start.


Which brings us back to the necessity for learning theory. Believe it or not, learning chord construction, is likely easier, than learning the thousands of named possibilities which exist.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 11, 2014,
#5
Agreed. That's sort of what I meant when I said "extended chords" in the open position. Was too lazy to type all that.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
I would learn dominant 7th chords next, then work out practice routines to put simple progressions (II V I,I IV V etc...) around the circle of fifths (an excellent practice routine).

After that I would look into chord construction theory, once you have a grasp of that you can build chords you need yourself - a much better way than memorising chords.
#7
are you using the chords you've learned to play songs?
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#8
I had a feeling you might say something like this. I just wasn't sure if there were another big group like major or minor and the 7ths for the blues. I suppose I could start learning how the chords can be extended like you guys were talking about. What should I learn to start constructing progressions. I guess you would start with 1,4,5 and 2,3,6. But are there guidelines for transition into a chorus from your main progression.
#9
There probably are. You could get some books on progressions, or even songwriting/composing. I'm sure there are free internet resources for this too if you do a google search.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?