ScreaminString
Registered User
Join date: May 2014
177 IQ
#1
Okay so i've layed my hands on an Epiphone Genesis for about 5 years now. Now that i'm starting to play less rock music and getting more into the Gary Moore ish kind of slow blues music with crying guitars and long notes. My Genesis doesn't exactly live up to the slow blues scene. I've been thinking of buying a new guitar, so what guitar is the best for playing this kind of music?
dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#5
That's nice!

If you like that, also consider the Reverend Manta Ray HB, Sensei HB, Jetstream or Six-Gun, depending on your tonal tastes.

If you're into LP's, I'm a fan of the Electra Omega or Omega Prime or the Malden Karma or Bad Karma would do the job just fine. The Reverend Rick Vito is also quite sweet.*


* I own a Prime, a BK, and a RV.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at May 12, 2014,
monwobobbo
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2009
608 IQ
#6
never considered Gary Moore slow blues lol. gary used a LP for much of his blues work as well as a strat. can't go wrong with either guitar for blues playing. you also may want to consider an ES-335 style axe
ScreaminString
Registered User
Join date: May 2014
177 IQ
#7
Well i have been thinking of purchasing a Les Paul for a while, anyone has expierience with them? What are the pros and cons?
dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#8
Almost as a rule, LP-style guitars* are pretty heavy (though some are contoured or weight-relieved). But that mass is part of what gives them their sustain.

Also, for whatever reasons, LP-style guitars tend not to have tremolos.


* as well as guitars evolved from the LP design, like the Dean Cadillac and Fernandes Ravelle.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
monwobobbo
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2009
608 IQ
#9
Quote by ScreaminString
Well i have been thinking of purchasing a Les Paul for a while, anyone has expierience with them? What are the pros and cons?


does anyone here not have experience with LP's lol. they have been a blues rock standard well since there has been blues rock. as mentioned they can be a bit on the heavy side and most have no trem but that really isn't a biggie.
ScreaminString
Registered User
Join date: May 2014
177 IQ
#10
Quote by monwobobbo
does anyone here not have experience with LP's lol. they have been a blues rock standard well since there has been blues rock. as mentioned they can be a bit on the heavy side and most have no trem but that really isn't a biggie.

And wich les paul should i buy? They are really pricy though
monwobobbo
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2009
608 IQ
#11
Quote by ScreaminString
And wich les paul should i buy? They are really pricy though


what's your budget? you can find LP Studios in the $600 range used. of course the nicer Epiphone LPs aren't bad if you are on a budget
Cajundaddy
60s throwback
Join date: Feb 2014
32 IQ
#12
No such thing as a "the best" Blues guitar. Only great Blues players who can get it done on anything. Tele, Strat, LP, LP jr, SG, 335, 175, 355, Epi Casino, Sheraton and many others have made seminal blues recordings in skilled hands.

Here is your "jazz" guitar in Gary's expert hands:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXljcwt7JMk
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#13
There's pretty much a decent LP-style guitar out there for nearly any budget, if you know what you want and where to look.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
Tony Done
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2014
699 IQ
#14
Gibson LP Special with P90s, or similar. I play mostly blues, but only slide on electrics. Overall P90s are my favourite pickups, and my favourite guitar most of the time is a 95 LP Special with P100s - excpet it weighs a ton.
gorgthemeatpile
UG's pile of meat
Join date: May 2011
136 IQ
#15
It's got to be the Ibanez RG2228. Drop some BKP Aftermaths in and you will definitely get that slow blues tone.

Actually, what you need is a new amp. I'd go with a Line 6.
Guitars:
ESP Eclipse II w/ SD Black Winters
Ibanez S540 w/ DiMarzios
Ibanez RG370DX w/ EMG 81/60
Ibanez RG7321 w/ DiMarzios
Pedals:
Fulltone FB-3
Crybaby Wah
Ibanez TS-9
Amps:
Peavey 6505+
dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#16
Quote by gorgthemeatpile
It's got to be the Ibanez RG2228. Drop some BKP Aftermaths in and you will definitely get that slow blues tone.

Actually, what you need is a new amp. I'd go with a Line 6.


Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
JustRooster
Internet Bully
Join date: Jan 2005
7,166 IQ
#17
Quote by ScreaminString
Well it looks like it's more of a jazz guitar, i can't really see this guitar screaming out high notes in a passionate way.


It absolutely can, though. Super 58's wail, dude.

Quote by EyeNon15
Thats too bad, I was under the impression I was arguing something profound

dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
1,110 IQ
#20
The absolute best guitar to play a slow blues on?



This might work:

dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
1,110 IQ
#21
Quote by ScreaminString
Well i have been thinking of purchasing a Les Paul for a while, anyone has expierience with them? What are the pros and cons?


Never heard of them.
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
1,110 IQ
#22
Quote by dannyalcatraz


Also, for whatever reasons, LP-style guitars tend not to have tremolos.



Well, they do, but they're all hiding, at my house, from the MLP types.

Those guys will come with the pitchforks and the torches, screaming "heresy, calumny, fellatio, flatulence!"

Last edited by dspellman at May 12, 2014,
gregs1020
Hi mom!
Join date: Dec 2007
10,786 IQ
#23
sure but half of them post about which bigsby doesn't require drilling into my murphy aged historic.
EricChic98
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2014
213 IQ
#24
I own a Godin Freeway Classic that plays blues very well. To me, the feel of my Godin is better then a Les Paul, I love Les Paul's, but I prefer Strat and tele shapes over LP's.
nathan:-)
'Straya
Join date: Jan 2009
1,141 IQ
#25
Try a Strat and Les Paul. They've always been the standard for blues.
deano_l
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2011
590 IQ
#26
I think OP, you have put the cart before the horse in a big way here.

There is no "best" guitar for slow blues.

Slow blues is just blues. Blues can be played on anything. See Seasick Steve for a good example!

Slow blues - indeed all blues and any music at all - is in your fingers. You could buy Gary Moore's entire rig and still not be able to make a slow blues sound good.

It's the subtleties in how your fingers on both hands work the strings that makes blues sound good, and the make and model of guitar is irrelevant to a degree.

But a Les Paul is a good choice, and Gary Moore shows fine taste on your part as he is a brilliant blues rock player. Did you know that his Les Paul used to belong to Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac, and the pickups were wired up in an odd way when Peter sent it off for repair in the 60's.

You can get a signature Gary Moore Les Paul from Gibson for several thousand dollars. But you wont sound like Gary moore or Peter Green, not without a few years of practice.

Blues is played on many different styles of guitars from many different makes, whether they be strat shaped, tele shaped, ES-335 chaped, Les Paul shaped, or even - if you are Albert King, who Gary Moore idolised - on a Flying-Vee!

Your amp will also be important. You can't get Gary Moore's tone without a decent amp setup and playing at stage volumes. I don't know what Gary used, probably Marshalls as that is what his blues albums were recorded on - A Bluesbreaker is on the album cover. But you need to raise that in the Gear forum.

But you can get a good basic blues sound from a modelling amp or small valve amp, and you can buy a decent guitar, and you will have a sound that will work, provided you put the work in to practice.

The way to learn blues is to listen to it and try to replicate what you hear. A slow-downer will be useful to slow down and loop and little section of a track so you can figure it out and get it under your fingers. Then repreat that for a few thousand hours.

You also need to take your decent amp and decent guitar to jams and play with people so you can use those licks in context. That way you will make them your own and you will start to get your own sound. You never know, you might then want to gravitate to a different type of guitar.

Do you have a budget in mind? That will help. Do you already have an amp? Do you need to use some of your budget to buy an amp? Do you want to buy new or are you okay with used? What's your location so some of the guys can advise on used guitars in your area?

Remember to listen to influences as well, in Gary's case that would be the Kings (Albert in particular). It's funny, when I listen to Gary Moore I here SRV in their sometimes, and vice-versa. It's probably because they both ripped off Albert King's licks!
monwobobbo
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2009
608 IQ
#27
Quote by deano_l
I think OP, you have put the cart before the horse in a big way here.

There is no "best" guitar for slow blues.

Slow blues is just blues. Blues can be played on anything. See Seasick Steve for a good example!

Slow blues - indeed all blues and any music at all - is in your fingers. You could buy Gary Moore's entire rig and still not be able to make a slow blues sound good.

It's the subtleties in how your fingers on both hands work the strings that makes blues sound good, and the make and model of guitar is irrelevant to a degree.

But a Les Paul is a good choice, and Gary Moore shows fine taste on your part as he is a brilliant blues rock player. Did you know that his Les Paul used to belong to Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac, and the pickups were wired up in an odd way when Peter sent it off for repair in the 60's.

You can get a signature Gary Moore Les Paul from Gibson for several thousand dollars. But you wont sound like Gary moore or Peter Green, not without a few years of practice.

Blues is played on many different styles of guitars from many different makes, whether they be strat shaped, tele shaped, ES-335 chaped, Les Paul shaped, or even - if you are Albert King, who Gary Moore idolised - on a Flying-Vee!

Your amp will also be important. You can't get Gary Moore's tone without a decent amp setup and playing at stage volumes. I don't know what Gary used, probably Marshalls as that is what his blues albums were recorded on - A Bluesbreaker is on the album cover. But you need to raise that in the Gear forum.

But you can get a good basic blues sound from a modelling amp or small valve amp, and you can buy a decent guitar, and you will have a sound that will work, provided you put the work in to practice.

The way to learn blues is to listen to it and try to replicate what you hear. A slow-downer will be useful to slow down and loop and little section of a track so you can figure it out and get it under your fingers. Then repreat that for a few thousand hours.

You also need to take your decent amp and decent guitar to jams and play with people so you can use those licks in context. That way you will make them your own and you will start to get your own sound. You never know, you might then want to gravitate to a different type of guitar.

Do you have a budget in mind? That will help. Do you already have an amp? Do you need to use some of your budget to buy an amp? Do you want to buy new or are you okay with used? What's your location so some of the guys can advise on used guitars in your area?

Remember to listen to influences as well, in Gary's case that would be the Kings (Albert in particular). It's funny, when I listen to Gary Moore I here SRV in their sometimes, and vice-versa. It's probably because they both ripped off Albert King's licks!


although I agree with some of this in the end not very helpful for OP. yes you can play blues on damn near any guitar and none are intrinsically better per se. on the other hand there are some tried and true favs that make a good starting point. gary like many blues players but took more than a page or two from Peter Green. Gary also played many guitars and managed blues licks on all of them. the OP never said anything about trying to cop gary's tone either just wanted suggestions for a guitar. I use a BC Rich Eagle in place of a LP but I probably wouldn't suggest it to others as a perfect blues guitar (despite the fact that I use it for blues rock).
deano_l
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2011
590 IQ
#28
Yep. Les Paul all day if he's into them. I play them but the Special with P90's. And a tele as well. Nowadays it's through a 15 watt Tweaker rather than the NMV AC30 at full chat like back in the day. The Blues is in the fingers and heart and soul and passion and you can be express them on Les Pauls and strats and yes even Charvels.