#1
Hello ultimate guitar community,

I have been playing acoustic guitar since November and I play 30 minutes to an hour a day. I really love playing it, but a lot the songs I love (classic rock) I am not able to play because most songs with power chords need electricity to sound good.

I have been saving up for an electric guitar and I have about $350 saved up. What do I need to know when buying my first electric guitar? I don't want to get ripped off by the music store guy into buying something I don't need, and I also don't want to leave the store without something I need.
#2
Save Up For A Better Electric Guitar .ender Mustang 1 Amp 20 Watts Is 119.99.get The Best Guitar You Can . Nd You Don/t Need No Amp To Practice On .
#3
A great choice for a first guitar is the Yamaha Pacifica 112.
Well built, reliable, versatile, and sounds good.

As far as the amp goes, solid choices are the Fender Mustang, Peavey Vypyr, Vox Valvetronix and Roland Cube.
Try to find a used one if you need to for it to fit your budget.
Squier "VMC" Stratocaster
PRS SE Singlecut
tc electronic polytune
CMAT MODS Signa Drive
Blakemore Effects Deus Ex Machina
DIY gaussmarkov Dr. Boogey
EHX Small Clone
Mooer ShimVerb
DIY Beavis Devolt
T-REX Fuel Tank Chameleon
Ampeg GVT52-112
#4
^ yeah

other things you might need are a strap, spare strings and plectrums, stand, instrument cable, tuner (though those modelling amps might have a tuner built in).

if you buy from a local shop they might throw some of those things in free. or at a reduced price.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ yeah

other things you might need are a strap, spare strings and plectrums, stand, instrument cable, tuner (though those modelling amps might have a tuner built in).

if you buy from a local shop they might throw some of those things in free. or at a reduced price.



Plectrum is a funny word.
#7
Well, just wanted to share my experience with you...
I have just recently grabbed an Yamaha Pacifica 112v and just bought a Fender Mustang I V2.
I would say that, for the price, you can't get much better than that.

When you pick your Yamaha Pacifica, just make sure whether it intonate properly (this is, whether the note played at the 12th fret is equivalent to the open string) and whether you don't have much fret buzz going on. Besides some buzz on my Pacifica (which I bought second hand), I can tell you it is superb and really fun! The pickup configuration allows for a wide range of tones (and adapts fairly well to different styles).

As far as Amps are concerned, buy a small modelling amp for less than 150 dollars. Modelling amps are cheap little emulators. They copy the sound of different amps and add effects on top of that. Honestly, they are all quite similar (specially if you don't have much experience). So, just go for the cheapest you can find... Have a look at the Roland Micro Cube. It will allow you to have several sounds and can be used as a portable amp. This can be useful in the future, if you end up choosing a bigger, proper amp, doubling as a night time playing device (or if you want to take your guitar around).

Voila!

Have fun!
Last edited by milcs at May 14, 2014,
#8
Quote by JustRooster
Plectrum is a funny word.


I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
I also think Yamaha's have great overall build quality for the price. I recently scored a late 80s Yamaha for under $300 when I was shopping for $800 American made strat. This "strat clone" just felt so solid and well-built -- intonation, movement around the fretboard, knobs, switches, machine heads, and had the longest sustain I've ever found on an electric. The craziest thing, in my mind, is how I can play it unplugged and it sounds really nice, lots of richness, I feel like I'm playing acoustic or semi-acoustic, all my other solid-bodies are very thin and really not "fun" to listen to unplugged. I think it has something to do with how heavy the body is on this particular model I got (not all Yamaha models will do this), but is also maybe a testament to them having some really great engineering / build ideas like how the neck connects to body.

Well, it does not hold tune or have as good intonation as my PRS, but it cost 1/5 as much and it's actually more fun for me to play -- that hard-to-describe "mojo" quality, or just finding that perfect guitar "for you." I almost did not try it, thought Yamahas were just too cheap, would have cheap build quality, and was truly amazed.

But that was late 80s, and things change...yet I just got a Yamaha amp for $230 (THR10) and it, too, is a pleasant surprise, great bang for the buck, really smartly done, great modeling amp and then some, like a swiss army knife for an amp, can do just about anything (short of give you really loud, real-tube tone). If you can get a decent used Yamaha Pacific for $120 and a Yamaha THR10 as your practice amp (or even the cheaper THR5), you'll be set for over a year.

Once you learn more about playing, get a better "ear" for tone, you'll naturally start to have a "preference" for guitar, for pick ups, for neck-type, for tonal preferences, and then you start the process of getting your "keeper" guitar that really fits you. I picked up cheap start electric and practice amp and it was fine for over a year, then it started to bug me because my ear got better, I was hearing flaws / cheapness, and wanted more, so I saved and it was about 2 years after I started playing that I finally pulled the trigger on better guitar / gear that fit me. When I was just starting, I just did not have a good enough ear, or enough knowledge, to do that, and I really believe you should NOT worry about this to start with, do not stress over finding a "keeper" guitar or amp when you just start out because you really do not know enough about playing, your ear is not good enough, and you just do not know yourself well enough - lots of people pick up the guitar thinking they know what kind of player they want to be, but as they play, they gravitate to other things, other genres (rhythm versus lead, blues or jazz versus metal, etc.) so don't put yourself in a box that way.

Buy cheap, learn, and then as your ear picks up flaws, and you grow dissatisfied with your gear, trade up. Really, that's one way you mark your progress, is when you learn to hear the flaws in your cheap gear. If you start out with great, flawless gear, you miss out on this, and do not have any way to judge how good your ear for tone, for fret buzz, for intonation, is improving.

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#10
Amp-wise Fender Mustangs, Vox VTs, and Roland cubes are all great choices. They can be had on Craigslist quite often for cheap if you're so inclined.

Guitar-wise. if you look around enough you can find an Epiphone LP standard for $200 or a Made in Mexico Fender strat for just a bit more. Both very quality instruments without breaking the bank.