#1
So, considering sheet music for guitar, the guitar is basically transposed an octave down and is heard lower than written normally.

But how should (or usually is) the sheet for the guitar be notated? The Wikipedia article about the guitar displayed its range as going from an E (below the staff) on a G-clef with an "8" below it to a D (above the staff) with "loco" above it.

I assume that it shouldn't say "loco" above each note that isn't transposed down, as it denotes (I think) a complete cancellation of the transposition? Should it then perhaps simply put an "8" above the specific notes to be played higher (while inside a suboctave G-clef)? Is the clef actually commonly notated with an "8" below it or is it generally dropped-off and rather regarded as a given rule?

Thanks in advance.
#2
The clef will often be written without the 8 below it because it's assumed for guitar music. The diagram you're referring to is just denoting the range of the instrument. You only use loco after an extended passage of octave displaced notes to indicate you're now going back to normal notation.

For guitar "normal notation" means the instrument will sound an octave lower than written. If you want to write notes that sound an octave higher than that (in other words, write notes at the sounding pitch of the guitar) you need to use 8va.
#3
The guitar is written same as the tenor voice in modern vocal score. It is a tenor instrument and is aSsumed to be written an octave higher than actual pitch. PerSonal opinion, the treble clef is inefficient for guitar in that we have multiple places to play the same pitches. I prefer the combination of tablatUre and standard notation as in guitar pro. Good luck with all
Last edited by P_Trik at May 13, 2014,
#4
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
The clef will often be written without the 8 below it because it's assumed for guitar music. The diagram you're referring to is just denoting the range of the instrument. You only use loco after an extended passage of octave displaced notes to indicate you're now going back to normal notation.

For guitar "normal notation" means the instrument will sound an octave lower than written. If you want to write notes that sound an octave higher than that (in other words, write notes at the sounding pitch of the guitar) you need to use 8va.


So that's what I meant in the second part. Basically you'd expect the notes to be written on a "normal" G-clef as it is an expectation of it being played an octave below, and if you want the notes to basically match their true pitch you'll write "octave up" 8.

But another thought about the specific way of writing for some cases: if I'll write for example a scale-run the would ascend for (let's say) 2-octaves and reach the part above the staff (that would also be used for the higher frets when notated with "8va"), will you for fluidity-of-reading notate the parts at the end of the scale up above the staff but without 8va, or perhaps you'd might want to move down the staff at one of the notes but use 8va (in order to leave further staff area for more ascending)?

If you managed to understand what was I asking...

Thanks.
Last edited by TLGuitar at May 13, 2014,
#5
^It's a question of taste and what you think is easiest to read. Usually for scale/arpeggio runs you wouldn't use 8va because it breaks the flow of the line and guitar never gets high enough that the ledger lines get out of hand really. In general, I would avoid 8va for guitar unless it really adds clarity. The rule of thumb for instruments is 4 or 5 ledger lines before using 8va, which means that the absolute highest note of most guitars wouldn't even need it.
#6
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
^It's a question of taste and what you think is easiest to read. Usually for scale/arpeggio runs you wouldn't use 8va because it breaks the flow of the line and guitar never gets high enough that the ledger lines get out of hand really. In general, I would avoid 8va for guitar unless it really adds clarity. The rule of thumb for instruments is 4 or 5 ledger lines before using 8va, which means that the absolute highest note of most guitars wouldn't even need it.


Well, the highest part on the average 22-frets guitar would actually be 6 ledger lines.
But I guess it could be readable for the amount of notes at this pitch you'd expect in a classical piece, for example. But possibly solos that tend to use the higher parts would make better sense using 8va.

I basically ask this as it's an aspect I want to address on some app I'm working on, where I'd rather keep it according to standards.