#1
https://soundcloud.com/amin122646/guitar-sob-d-minor

I'm not professional. It's around 1 year and 3 months for me. Still learning and sloppy for sure :P. The song is in D minor. I don't know much theory and taught myself learning through net, forums and helpful people! i used D minor harmonic and melodic scale as the backing track was in d-minor.

My question is: What all scales can i play in d minor? How can i give it more colors? Is my playing blending with the track?? Any tips??

thank you guys!
#2
Hey man--I'm pretty impressed given the length of time you've been playing. I'm self-taught as well and know how hard it can be during those first few months to learn how to play as well as try to garner enough knowledge about theory to make your own songs.

So as a critical assessment of the guitar-work itself, you were mostly in time with the backing track, which is one of the more difficult aspects of guitar playing to nail early on. The gaps in timing grew more apparent later on in the track particularly between the 3 and 4 minute marks so I'd try to tighten that up a bit. The overall playing technique was good but I'd recommend adding more vibrato at the ends of some of your lines. Since you're playing mostly (only?) single notes throughout it'll give them more life and enhance the overall body of the piece.

I think you have a solid foundation with what you've got so why not try to expand upon it? Fiddle around with adding in a second or third note sporadically. It'll mix things up and keep the listener interested and engaged. Don't worry if it fits in the scale--just use your ear to see how it sounds.

And as for the scales, I mean, you COULD sit down and essentially try to piece together a solo or a song and be theoretically accurate...but that's not really music, you know? I'd recommend just LISTENING to music and playing along. Then, if you find commonalities between similar sounding songs, you can look into their respective keys and learn the scales that way.

Seriously though--playing along to tracks and learning to figure them out by ear are the two most important and most effective ways of improving your own playing. If you're a big lead guy then why not scope out a song like Dire Straits' Sultans of Swing or Eric Clapton's acoustic version of Layla.

Anyway--I liked the track and think you're definitely on the right path here. Good luck!
#3
Quote by lpwjbklyn
Hey man--I'm pretty impressed given the length of time you've been playing. I'm self-taught as well and know how hard it can be during those first few months to learn how to play as well as try to garner enough knowledge about theory to make your own songs.

So as a critical assessment of the guitar-work itself, you were mostly in time with the backing track, which is one of the more difficult aspects of guitar playing to nail early on. The gaps in timing grew more apparent later on in the track particularly between the 3 and 4 minute marks so I'd try to tighten that up a bit. The overall playing technique was good but I'd recommend adding more vibrato at the ends of some of your lines. Since you're playing mostly (only?) single notes throughout it'll give them more life and enhance the overall body of the piece.

I think you have a solid foundation with what you've got so why not try to expand upon it? Fiddle around with adding in a second or third note sporadically. It'll mix things up and keep the listener interested and engaged. Don't worry if it fits in the scale--just use your ear to see how it sounds.

And as for the scales, I mean, you COULD sit down and essentially try to piece together a solo or a song and be theoretically accurate...but that's not really music, you know? I'd recommend just LISTENING to music and playing along. Then, if you find commonalities between similar sounding songs, you can look into their respective keys and learn the scales that way.

Seriously though--playing along to tracks and learning to figure them out by ear are the two most important and most effective ways of improving your own playing. If you're a big lead guy then why not scope out a song like Dire Straits' Sultans of Swing or Eric Clapton's acoustic version of Layla.

Anyway--I liked the track and think you're definitely on the right path here. Good luck!


Oh god!! I'm so boosted by your answer. Thanks a ton for checking it out. I feel confident. Thanks for the great advice. I will absolutely run them out with this same track. I getting a new guitar next month, and one which stays in tune, :P so that i can develop my ear. This guitar goes out of tune most of the time! But anyways thanks for giving your time! I hope i can utilize your suggestion successfully~ ^^
#5
Quote by steven seagull
Moved to MT


oh sorry about that! will post these kind of questions in MT from next time!
#6
The scales you play depend on the chords you are playing over. It is important to listen to the backing track.

But over this backing track D minor scale (harmonic or natural) is what sounds the best (because it's a basic i-iv-V style progression).

I liked the beginning of the solo a lot. You didn't play too many notes and it actually sounded like you were listening to the track and didn't just play random notes. Many guitarists start with playing too many notes and it can make their solo sound boring pretty easily. The rest of the solo wasn't that special (it sounded more like just noodling around the scale than actually playing melodies) - but that's undestandable because you haven't been playing for that long. And you'll get better at it. And as I said, the beginning sounded really good.

About using the different minor scales... You want to use harmonic minor over V chords (because of the raised seventh of the harmonic minor scale) and you don't usually want to use natural minor over it because the seventh note of natural minor will clash with the V chord (sometimes it has a cool effect though). But over i and iv chords natural minor will work (and sometimes better than harmonic minor). That's because neither of the chords have the seventh scale degree in them (if we are in D minor, I'm talking about the seventh note of D minor which is C or C#).

Melodic minor is a bit harder to use. Ascending melodic minor has raised 6th and 7th notes. And why it's called "ascending" is because it's usually used on melodies that go up. It makes melodies sound smoother because it avoids the augmented 2nd between the minor 6th and major 7th scale degrees (of the harmonic minor scale) that can sound a bit out of place. The melodic minor scale clashes with many chords and I would suggest using it over the V chord when your melody goes up. That's where it's usually used.

But the best thing is to try it yourself and use your ears. Try to hit chord tones. Also, it's good to learn what notes are in which chords. That way you'll understand why some notes work better over some chords. Chord tones will always work. They will always sound consonant. Of course this doesn't mean you should only play arpeggios. But be aware of the chord tones.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#7
Quote by MaggaraMarine
The scales you play depend on the chords you are playing over. It is important to listen to the backing track.

But over this backing track D minor scale (harmonic or natural) is what sounds the best (because it's a basic i-iv-V style progression).

I liked the beginning of the solo a lot. You didn't play too many notes and it actually sounded like you were listening to the track and didn't just play random notes. Many guitarists start with playing too many notes and it can make their solo sound boring pretty easily. The rest of the solo wasn't that special (it sounded more like just noodling around the scale than actually playing melodies) - but that's undestandable because you haven't been playing for that long. And you'll get better at it. And as I said, the beginning sounded really good.

About using the different minor scales... You want to use harmonic minor over V chords (because of the raised seventh of the harmonic minor scale) and you don't usually want to use natural minor over it because the seventh note of natural minor will clash with the V chord (sometimes it has a cool effect though). But over i and iv chords natural minor will work (and sometimes better than harmonic minor). That's because neither of the chords have the seventh scale degree in them (if we are in D minor, I'm talking about the seventh note of D minor which is C or C#).

Melodic minor is a bit harder to use. Ascending melodic minor has raised 6th and 7th notes. And why it's called "ascending" is because it's usually used on melodies that go up. It makes melodies sound smoother because it avoids the augmented 2nd between the minor 6th and major 7th scale degrees (of the harmonic minor scale) that can sound a bit out of place. The melodic minor scale clashes with many chords and I would suggest using it over the V chord when your melody goes up. That's where it's usually used.

But the best thing is to try it yourself and use your ears. Try to hit chord tones. Also, it's good to learn what notes are in which chords. That way you'll understand why some notes work better over some chords. Chord tones will always work. They will always sound consonant. Of course this doesn't mean you should only play arpeggios. But be aware of the chord tones.


Hey thanks a lot for some theory tips! I would really love to understand more about music theory and im gonna get a book i guess! But thanks for writing such useful info! "D
#8
No help just a comment:
I liked your Dm sob, it was cool, sure a little tested in places but that's to be expected.
People post all sorts of interesting links to theory round here, all the time, so stick around, browse a bit, and you should find what you're looking for. GL!
#9
Quote by tonibet72
No help just a comment:
I liked your Dm sob, it was cool, sure a little tested in places but that's to be expected.
People post all sorts of interesting links to theory round here, all the time, so stick around, browse a bit, and you should find what you're looking for. GL!


hey thanks a lot man!! ^^ Yeah i'm really finding this website very helpful!