#1
I been playing guitar for ~3 years seriously but i've had one to noodle on for about 10. I bought a bass to start learning yesterday, a fender squire jazz something or other. I really enjoy playing on it and it's fresh and fun for me.

Anyway I went for a drink with my guitar teacher/drinking buddy and we were talking about my new bass, and he said that if I want to be good enough to gig professionally (I don't want to gig, but i do want to play at a professional standard) i have left it way to late to start another instrument, and that I should just focus on the guitar instead.

I dunno what to do, kinda torn so came here for advice.
#2
He's an idiot. In fact, show him this post.

I know a gentleman that never played an instrument before in his life. He admits to having to work hard to learn his instrument of choice, and has done so over the past two years. He doesn't believe he has natural talent- he even says playing can really frustrate him. He's one of the greatest saxophonists I've had the pleasure of playing with. He's 76 years old.
#3
what kinda dumb shit advice is that and he's a guitar teacher? That's just embarrassing take the bass put in the practice and have some ****in fun with it
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#4
i got my first bass like about 6 months ago after playing guitar for years. I'm 32.

your teacher's a tool
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
I started playing bass at at 44 years old after playing guitar. I've been gigging on and off for several years now, some times with a local respected jazz player.

Your teacher is extremely short sighted.
#6
What a ****ing moron, the only slight advantage to learning as a child is extra time, adults learn a lot easier and considering you already play guitar, you basically already play bass, you can play live with like 99% of bands just by playing root notes. I would advise you drop your obviously sub-standard teacher immediately. I mean, if you really want to be an amazing bass player, it takes dedication, but you can easily dedicate yourself to 2 instruments, if you have the time. Plenty of people continuously pick up new instruments throughout their lifetime.

I'm 23 and recently started playing bass, no problem, it'll just take a little while for your calluses to build up, unprepared right hand finger tips are painful...
#7
There is a ton of overlap between learning bass and guitar. You have to press your fingers harder and learn some right hand techniques (You already have a ton of them to learn on guitar. What's a few more?). And everything you learn on one instrument will benefit you on the other. If there are any two instruments to best be mastered at once, it's guitar and bass. I call myself a guitarist primarily as I've been playing for 8 years, but I've developed more than enough bass skill over the last 2 or so years just occasionally working on some right hand skills that I can safely call myself a bassist as well. I'm not nearly at a level that satisfies me, but depending on the genre, I could most certainly gig professionally for most rock or pop bands, (or most metal bands if they use a pick). My point being, you're teacher/buddy is dead wrong.
#8
This is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. No one is ever too old to start, what a load of crap.
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#9
Holy crap i'm surprised this is the opinion round here. Pleasantly surprised though, you guys have really put a spring in my step to learn the bass properly now. Been practicing for the last two hours and this has cheered me up.

As for my teacher, he's a good teacher don't base your opinion on him based on what i've said, it's just that he can be really blunt sometimes i suppose.

thank you guys for the responses
#10
That dude is an idiot. If you are willing to put in the work, you can get to the level that you aspire to play at. Just keep practicing and have fun with it. I played the guitar for two years before I got my first bass about seven months ago. You just have to be willing to practice, but you can easily continue with two instruments.
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#11
In like 90% of situations, bass parts are watered down rhythm guitar parts. If you can play guitar there's no reason why you can't get into bass. Playing the more bass demanding stuff may not be easy, but it's far from impossible and don't let anyone bring you down!
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#13
Quote by Velcro Man
(a) What a ****ing moron, the only slight advantage to learning as a child is extra time, adults learn a lot easier

(b) I'm 23 and recently started playing bass, no problem, it'll just take a little while for your calluses to build up, unprepared right hand finger tips are painful...


(a) I think children probably learn quicker than adults. But that's sort of counteracted by the fact that (in general, obviously there are exceptions) adults may take it more seriously.

But it's not like the amount of difference it makes means that you can't learn when older or anything like that.

(b) I haven't had any problems at all with sore fingers at all. I dunno if I'm a mutant or what (normally I'm pretty wussy ). Or maybe I just do way too much tapping on guitar.

Quote by redd9
Holy crap i'm surprised this is the opinion round here. Pleasantly surprised though, you guys have really put a spring in my step to learn the bass properly now. Been practicing for the last two hours and this has cheered me up.

As for my teacher, he's a good teacher don't base your opinion on him based on what i've said, it's just that he can be really blunt sometimes i suppose.

thank you guys for the responses


sort of wonder if he wasn't trying some clumsy reverse psychology

Thing about being blunt is, a bit of tact doesn't cost anything. and if you're gonna be blunt you better be darn sure you're 100% in the right. cos if you're not (even if the point is debatable), you look like a dick (with some justification IMO).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at May 15, 2014,
#14
I take up a new instrument every year or two. I currently play guitar, piano, bass, accordion, mandolin, cittern, drums, Latin percussion, violin, harmonica and a few others that I can't even think of off the top of my head.

Something that I have learned is that every time I start a new instrument I get better at the old instruments. So when I started playing guitar I got better at drums, when I started playing harmonica I got better at guitar. So even if you don't learn your new instrument to a professional standard, it's still worth a shot if for no other reason than to improve your ability on instruments you already know.

Something else I have learned is that age is not nearly as big a deal as people make out. I started piano when I was 8 or 9 and I such at piano. I can write good songs on the piano and plunk my way through a melody but I still suck at it. I didn't start guitar until I was in my late teens and I'm OK at guitar but I would never perform in front of a paying audience. I started harmonica in my late 20's and I regularly get paid for my harmonica abilities. Latin percussion is something I didn't start until my early 30's and I'm good enough to get paid for that too.

So only good things can happen if you try and learn a new instrument and if somebody tells you that you are tool old to learn a new one then I wouldn't take what they say seriously. If your teacher tells you that you are too old, I'd look at getting a new teacher. You don't need to start when you are young. In my case, starting young had no advantage at all. I'm better at the instruments I started later in my life.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at May 15, 2014,