#1
.. I just acquired a Strat, so now there are two Strat guitar players, a drummer but no bassist. Should we be worried about not having a bass in songwriting setting, or should we just just continue writing song and wait until we have enough for a set list then find someone to fill the bassist role later?

We haven't really thought about playing live as we want to polish our craft, yet how important it is to find a bassist in our case? Has there been any band that has two guitarists but no bassist? Hence, what sort of tweaking can we do to compensate for the lack of bass sound?

Related note: we have known each other for a while (good friends) so we can open up easily in songwriting process, we have great chemistry. The thing about other members I believe are concerned is they re not comfortable with someone outside of our social circle, they're afraid that new guy will break the chemistry. Have you guys been in this situation and how did you come to resolve this?
#2
So you started a three-piece with two guitar players and a drummer? Clever, you.

It's not that it hasn't been done. There've been two piece bands before but usually the guitar player throws in a bass-pickup somewhere.

If you're going to be playing live you'll want to get a bass player. If you guys are just writing right now, don't worry about it since he can learn the songs later. But the sooner you get one the sooner you can get show ready.

As for finding someone that's compatible with your circle of friends just ask whoever in question if they'd want to hang out with you guys one day and see how it goes. If they work, they work, if they don't then oh well. It's really trial by fire at that point.
#3
The no bass player live thing has been done before. Most famously, with the Doors. Ray Manzerek played keyboards, his left hand was the bass player live. You are more than likely going to need a bass player for any recording sessions. Either a real bass player, or one of you can record the parts. You have to have the low end to balance out the guitars. Even the Doors, who had no bass live, recorded with a bass.
I'm guessing you guys are young? No offense meant by the assumption, just that, in order to grow as a band you may eventually have to look to strangers to fill a role or two. Music has a great way of bringing people together who weren't friends before. Especially when you play it together. If someone breaks your chemistry, you find someone else.

TL DR: You can keep doing what you're doing for now. Maybe get a knock around bass to come up with some basslines to try out, and be ready to record them if you get that far. As far as live? One of you could pick up the bass until you fill the hole. Like you said, though, that's in the future.
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#4
Animals as Leaders is a progressive band which has no bass player (One of the guitar players records the bass parts for the albums, but they play live with only two guitars). It's good to remember they use 8-string guitars, though.

Depending on the kind of music you're in you can write everything without a bass player, since in lots of styles the only thing the bass does is give kind of a "boom" to the band's sound.
But there are cases when you want nice bass phrases, which stand out in the song, so it's good to have a bass player during the songwriting process in this case.

Playing live without a bass player is not a very good idea, but if you really have to, give the rhythm guitar more bass in the EQ, it won't sound awesome, but will give you a better sound than you'd have with standard EQ and no bass player.
#5
Quote by mp8andrade
Animals as Leaders is a progressive band which has no bass player (One of the guitar players records the bass parts for the albums, but they play live with only two guitars). It's good to remember they use 8-string guitars, though.

Depending on the kind of music you're in you can write everything without a bass player, since in lots of styles the only thing the bass does is give kind of a "boom" to the band's sound.
But there are cases when you want nice bass phrases, which stand out in the song, so it's good to have a bass player during the songwriting process in this case.

Playing live without a bass player is not a very good idea, but if you really have to, give the rhythm guitar more bass in the EQ, it won't sound awesome, but will give you a better sound than you'd have with standard EQ and no bass player.


Animals As Leaders still having backing tracks to fill out the low end. No amount of strings on a guitar will cover for the fact there is no bass.
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#6
I thought blink 182 had 2 guitarists , no bass , could be wrong thou
#7
Lack of bass is not great. Make sure that both the guitars are EQ'd to try and give them their own space. You could use backing tracks if yuou can get them recorded and you are all able to play to them tightly (drummer might want a click to play along to)

Think about how it would feel if you came into a band of three close friends... of course it will change the chemistry somewhat. Being in the band, it is your jobs to make any new member feel at home so that they can try and get into the chemistry.

Of course it can sometimes just not work, but that's life, you won't necessarily bring the right member in the first time.
#8
Quote by greg73
I thought blink 182 had 2 guitarists , no bass , could be wrong thou


bass and guitar, far as i'm aware
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#9
Quote by CNC-Digity
Animals As Leaders still having backing tracks to fill out the low end. No amount of strings on a guitar will cover for the fact there is no bass.


This.

The bass in those kind of bands are really important. The guitar kind of drowns it out a lot but, when the bass is gone you'll no doubt notice it missing. I feel like a lot of people think that the dark "djenty" prog kind of sound comes from low end guitars but the bass really beefs it up a lot.
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#10
Quote by Fallenoath
but the bass really beefs it up a lot.

A lot of people don't notice how prominent an instrument the bass is a lot of the times, TS, it's surprising how much better and fuller your band will sound with a bass player so I think you should find one as soon as you can, so you also have time to gel.
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#11
Quote by ryanbwags
The no bass player live thing has been done before. Most famously, with the Doors. Ray Manzerek played keyboards, his left hand was the bass player live. You are more than likely going to need a bass player for any recording sessions. Either a real bass player, or one of you can record the parts. You have to have the low end to balance out the guitars. Even the Doors, who had no bass live, recorded with a bass.
I'm guessing you guys are young? No offense meant by the assumption, just that, in order to grow as a band you may eventually have to look to strangers to fill a role or two. Music has a great way of bringing people together who weren't friends before. Especially when you play it together. If someone breaks your chemistry, you find someone else.

TL DR: You can keep doing what you're doing for now. Maybe get a knock around bass to come up with some basslines to try out, and be ready to record them if you get that far. As far as live? One of you could pick up the bass until you fill the hole. Like you said, though, that's in the future.

Actually The Doors had a bassist live - it was their keyboardist. Bassist doesn't need to play the bass guitar. You just need low frequencies. Ray played basslines so they certainly did have a bassist.

Also, on their first album Ray played Fender Rhodes bass with his left hand and his Vox organ with his right hand. They did have a bass guitar on some songs but most of the songs on the first album did not have a bass guitar on them. The Fender Rhodes bass sounded a bit like bass guitar but it still sounded different. Just listen to the intro of "Break on Through".

John Paul Jones from Led Zeppelin also played organ and on the songs he played organ/keyboard, he played the bassline with organ pedals or left hand. He did usually record studio bass but IIRC, the bass on "Since I've Been Loving You" was played on organ pedals.

Synth bass is really common. It fits many songs better than bass guitar (especailly more electronic songs).
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at May 17, 2014,
#12
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffr0opfm6I4
Velvet Underground - Heroin was recorded with just 2 guitars and a drumkit

but its like the most stripped down song in the world

Maybe at least one of you could try playing acoustic guitar. An acoustic fills out a very different sonic space to a strat. It might make your sound a little fuller.

Consider that bass frequencies are quite expected in a concert setting. Maybe you wanna give it to them, maybe you don't. But be aware of it.