#1
I have been looking at multitrack recorders, im a one man rock band so im looking for the best among quality, features and work flow. I have narrowed my choices down to tascam dp03, dp24 and the boss br800, what do you think? Also going to be recording direct with a pod
Last edited by jamesdolecek at May 15, 2014,
#3
Quote by vocoderboy
why a recorder? why not computer+software?


I'm kind of wondering about this as well. A Tascam is probably the most handy tool for a band when writing and doing demos and stuff, but if you're one man looking to record everything yourself in different takes, it takes more time to do it this way. I know a guy that uses one for his solo project and the freedom of recording anything anywhere is great, especially for his artsy atmospheric stuff, but I feel that a laptop and interface (while more expensive) gives you more control and options, and is much quicker to work than a Tascam.

That being said, those things last forever and are super reliable. I've brought them along to gigs and recorded the set so I could listen back and see what needs improvement or tweeks. I think their a really great tool for bands and demos, but if you're looking to release music, I would use the tried and true computer and interface. However, if you're talking about an acoustic act where it's just you and a guitar or something, a portable recording device would be better suited for you, because you won't require a lot of editing or overdubbing.
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#5
Quote by vocoderboy
why a recorder? why not computer+software?

For the same reason some people choose a Fender over a Gibson. Or a Multi Effects pedal over a collection of separate pedals. Preference.

A good multitracker can do everything the software equivalent can, with the exception of downloadable VSTs (although even that limitation is reduced with the latest equipment). A lot have an in built drum machine and bass sequencer, in addition to a fairly comprehensive collection of vocal & guitar effects/amp sims etc. and obviously now you can connect the most up to date multitrackers to your PC for addition of new VSTs, but if you want lots of those it's probably easier to just use the PC.

For someone who just wants the ability to record themselves as part of their guitar playing hobby, a multitracker can often be the right answer.

For someone who wants to make recording a hobby in it's own right (or who wants it to be a potential career), a multitracker is the wrong answer.

TS - there's a load of recommendations in the sticky, but most have already been covered in this thread.

My thoughts on the main multitracker brands:
Tascam - excellent quality, but don't include drum machine which is a big disadvantage. I have the 2488MkII & it does a great job for me.

Zoom - The R series are a great innovation, a hybrid multitracker/interface. The included drum machine is very usable and has some great sounds in it, if anything the only disadvantage is that it's designed to be hooked up to a PC based DAW for the final mix, so if you want a standalone multitracker it's the wrong answer.

Boss - excellent pieces of kit. They do everything a home recording hobbyist could need. The trouble is, they're significantly more expensive than their competitors and I've yet to find a reason other than brand prestige.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at May 16, 2014,
#6
@ Gary - not sure about the statement on career path. When starting one needs to listen and get sounds and the PC is usually at a disadvantage there as most modern recordists tweak with their eyes. Getting the basics down with a multitrack is still a much needed path IMO.
#7
Quote by diabolical
@ Gary - not sure about the statement on career path. When starting one needs to listen and get sounds and the PC is usually at a disadvantage there as most modern recordists tweak with their eyes. Getting the basics down with a multitrack is still a much needed path IMO.

I wouldn't disagree with that - they're great tools for learning the basics and usually have a bunch of presets that get you off to a good start. Once you start playing with those presets you start to learn what will happen when you tweak different things.

If anything, the biggest disadvantage these days is the initial investment of purchasing a multitracker. When a kid just starting out compares the cost to the price of a guitar link & free software (assuming they already have a PC) a multitracker is a lot of money.
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#8
Quote by GaryBillington


If anything, the biggest disadvantage these days is the initial investment of purchasing a multitracker. When a kid just starting out compares the cost to the price of a guitar link & free software (assuming they already have a PC) a multitracker is a lot of money.


Very true...I started out on 4 track Tascam tape multitracker, moved on to slightly bigger Fostex with just a few outboard fx, for reverb had to improvise with my guitar amp's spring reverb unit, used bathrooms,etc... Better to work with your ears when starting out, you can always learn how to punch buttons on a keyboard later if you have what it takes.

Anyway, I've been looking at AKAI 24DSP (all in one recorder) while they were new or newly used but unfortunately by the time I could afford them they got pretty old and didn't want to pull the trigger on something that could have a high failure rate.

Anyway, buying a hardware unit I've noticed you get better bang for the buck - specialized unit that rarely if at all needs updates and won't break down after the new version of Windows or Mac OS comes on the market.
Last edited by diabolical at May 17, 2014,
#9
I had one of those old Tascams too

My first experimentations with 'multitracking' came before that though...I just used two normal tape recorders. Recorded onto the first one, then played along with it whilst recording with the second. Unlimited tracks. Awesome.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
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