#1
Greetings gents!

I'm having this problem with some of my guitars, and I'd like to know if it's something normal and/or fixable.

First guitar is a Schecter Stargazer with an Aftermath(B) and a Stockholm (P90-N). Second one is an Epi Lp which sports Tesla VR humbuckers.

On both guitars the neck pick ups are on equal height with the pick up rings (which are the slim ones) and the bridge pick-ups around a centimeter away from the strings (which is pretty high I think).

On both guitars the neck pick up is a lot louder than the bridge one, to the point that it sometimes drives amps harder/gets crunchier (!!!). Is this something that can be caused/fixed by wiring?

Thanks!
#2
Having the bridge pickups quieter is actually quite normal because there is more string movement in the middle of the string than at the end. Wiring isn't the way to fix it. You said your bridge pickup is a centimeter from the strings and for a bridge pickup that is still pretty low. Try moving it up more and that will help. Also, get used to using your volume knob. Once you start using it, it will become second nature.
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#3
Yeah, like Corduroy said: Your bridge pickup is very low. A centimeter is way to far away from the strings.
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#4
It sounds like your pickups need ballancing. When I'm setting up a new pair of pickups, I plug the guitar into an amp, turn the volume and tone knobs up to max so the pots are all the same. Next raise the bridge pickup up untill it sounds right. (3/32" on my latest build). Then raise the front pickup untill it sounds as loud as the bridge pickup when you switch from the front to the rear, (5/64" on mine).
This gives you equal volume from each pickup at any setting.
Or you can start with the front pickup, raising it as high as possible without sound distortion, then matching the bridge to that. The closer the pickup is to the strings the better the tone. If you have adjustable poles, match their height to the fretboard radius so thee poles will be equal distance from the strings as you adjust the pickup. Good luck.
#5
Quote by Guitbuilder
It sounds like your pickups need ballancing. When I'm setting up a new pair of pickups, I plug the guitar into an amp, turn the volume and tone knobs up to max so the pots are all the same. Next raise the bridge pickup up untill it sounds right. (3/32" on my latest build). Then raise the front pickup untill it sounds as loud as the bridge pickup when you switch from the front to the rear, (5/64" on mine).
This gives you equal volume from each pickup at any setting.
Or you can start with the front pickup, raising it as high as possible without sound distortion, then matching the bridge to that. The closer the pickup is to the strings the better the tone. If you have adjustable poles, match their height to the fretboard radius so thee poles will be equal distance from the strings as you adjust the pickup. Good luck.


I use most of that system, except I adjust the pole pieces for good adjacent string to string balance first, which in my case always involves having the (plain) 3rd lower than the (wound) 4th. Then I do the output check on the treble and bass strings, so that pickup tilt is also adjusted for the desired output. The inner pole pieces might then need another tweak for even output between adjacent strings, I usually do this after I've played it for bit with different (clean) amp and tone settings.