#1
Hi dear UG members!! I recently started studying natural major and minor scale and as a part of it I’m trying to get the triads (root, 3rd, and 5th) as well. I know that there are different types of triads (major, minor, diminished etc.) and they are used to construct arpeggios and chords. There are triad chords but triads can be played in other ways as well.

I think I got the basic concept of it but can anyone suggest me that how should I practice triads? I meant triad chords and their inversions can be played all over the fretboard and if they are connected at a specific region I get 6, 5 or 3 strings full sweeping arpeggios (although I can’t sweep pick). But other than this, what should I do? Am I missing something here?
#2
Well more importantly than the physical aspect you need to know what they sound like so you'll know when you want to use them. If you don't get the sound in your head and know when to use them then there's no point being able to play them anyway.
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Well more importantly than the physical aspect you need to know what they sound like so you'll know when you want to use them. If you don't get the sound in your head and know when to use them then there's no point being able to play them anyway.

I'm already familiar with how triads sound, thus I'm figuring them out by myself. I just need hints/ideas about practicing triads thus I'll have better understanding about how to use them in more musical manner. Can you suggest any musical piece/solo that can give me hint about using triads. I already figured out that GnR version of Knockin' on heaven's door's main solo section have a major triad (probably G) outlining.
#4
Triads and there inversions can be really intimidating. Try to resist the urge to learn everything at once. Whether you're practicing them as chords or arpeggios, try learning one set of shapes at a time. Work on that set of shapes until you're comfortable and able to integrate them into your playing. Then, find another set and repeat the process. When it comes to the arpeggios, start with your chosen shape and work on it on only two strings, and add a string to the shape each time you feel that you're comfortable with the result. For example, here's an A minor arpeggio on two, three, four and five strings.

e|-12-8--------12-8----------12-8---------------12-8------------------|
B|--------10-------- --10-------------10-----------------10-------------|
G|--------------------------9---------------9-------------------9----------|
D|----------------------------------------------10-----------------10------|
A|-----------------------------------------------------------------------12-|
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|

The inversions depend on which note you start with. So you can technically play the root, 1st inversion and 2nd inversion of a triad in any shape you construct by changing the starting note.
#5
Quote by OdysseyOvShred
Triads and there inversions can be....

Thanks for the advice. I'm learning triads slowly but remembering the inversions seems quite difficult as the inversion triads may start from the 3rd or the 5th note instead of the root. My main objective is not just learning them but also achieving the ability to incorporate them in playing (or at least understanding how they are used in the solos).
#6
Quote by stranger_23
I'm already familiar with how triads sound, thus I'm figuring them out by myself. I just need hints/ideas about practicing triads thus I'll have better understanding about how to use them in more musical manner. Can you suggest any musical piece/solo that can give me hint about using triads. I already figured out that GnR version of Knockin' on heaven's door's main solo section have a major triad (probably G) outlining.


Sorry I've been away from this for a while, I've only just got my thoughts to a point where I know what I want to say:

You are getting this backwards. You're trying to get triads in to your playing just for the sake of it where you should be using this knowledge to better get the sounds in your head out in to the world. The music first, then the tools you need to make it, you don't put the tools first: you wouldn't look around for something to hammer just because you own one: you wait until you need it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
Hey man. Triads and arps, cool. I'd start by taking the chords you know and love and identifying the triads in them. For example, an E chord is 022100 = a root, fifth, root(octave), third, fifth, root. You can do that then with A, G, E, and D (CAGED). When you are quickly recognizing how the triads are constructed in those chords, you'll find it easy to change them around however you want, e.g., flatting the third to a minor or adding a suspension.

As for the arps, it's good to just run through them pretty mechanically at first. Once the basic shape is mentally formed in your mind, you can skip around them, ie, instead of going 135135135135, you can go 135351513135. backwards and forwards, with different permutations, etc. Hope that helps cause I always hated practicing arpeggios
#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Sorry I've been away from this for a while....

I understood what you are trying to say, I'm just a bit enthusiastic about incorporating triads in my playing because I liked the sounds of arpeggios and as I figured out that even the chunks of a full arpeggio (which is triad) can sound very melodic if played right thus I became more interested about playing them. I'm still inexperienced about wring solos so I guess I need more practice and practical knowledge of using the music theory in actual playing.
#9
Quote by Buttcheex8
Hey man. Triads and arps, cool....

Thanks for you advice. Really appreciating your input, those are some nice suggestions. One thing to ask you, I noticed that you mentioned about CAGED. I still haven't followed it (in fact I don't know what is CAGED method and why this is practiced). I know that this is irrelevant but can you enlighten me a bit about it?
#11
A good way to learn triads is to start with the "3 adjacent strings" exercise.

Starting on your lowest 3 strings - E A D - locate a root position G major triad (hint: 320xxx). Then, find the next chord tone up on the same set of strings. That would be starting on B, on the low E string, which is the third of G. Complete that triad (755xxx) and you'll have your G in first in version. Move up again to the 5th, D on the low E string (10.10.9xxx), and that's 2nd inversion. Last, move up to the G an octave above where you started, just so you'll have the triad through a whole octave on the fretboard. This also helps with learning the upper regions of the guitar.

So, your G major example will like this when you play it:

320xxx, 755xxx, 10.10.9xxx, 15.14.12xxx. And then play them descending back to where you started, and move up to the next key you want practice. I recommend circle of 5ths order, because it's easier than moving around randomly.

Once you've done all 12 keys on the lowest three strings, move to the next set of three adjacent strings, A D G, repeat the exercise, and so on.

Make certain you know what notes and inversions you're playing, not just the chord shapes. This will probably be pretty slow going at first, but it's an extremely effective way of learning your basics. If you stick with it you'll be able to play them competently within a few weeks.
#12
Quote by ifsixwasni9e
John Petrucci has a video....

The link you've shared is pretty good, quite good example about playing arpeggios. And about Jeff Loomis I'm not that familiar with his works, but Andy James is really a phenomenal player. I'm not that much into his style of playing but I do love his solo 'Angel of Darkness'. Wish I could play that (although I'm not half as good as him at playing guitar).
Quote by cdgraves
A good way to learn triads is to start with the....

Thanks for the suggestion. You've explained it quite clearly and your approach/advice for learning all the triad seems very logical and straight forward. I'll follow your advice. Thanks again.