#1
Can tighter strings make just the strumming motion more difficult?
#2
I didn't really notice that in particular getting harder.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#3
Depends on the person, the thickness of their pick, and how hard they dig in when they pick or strum.

I prefer thicker strings for strumming. I can be rougher without making the notes go sharp and it just seems to "flow" a little better.
Ibanez Prestige RG852MPB
Ibanez Prestige RG652KFX
ESP E-II M-1
LTD AW-7
Schecter Loomis NT
EVH 5150 III 50
PRS 212 DB
Line 6 POD HD500X
Deadhorse OD/Boss HM-2
#4
usually the difference you notice is on the frets. they will be harder to press down. probably won't notice while picking too much.

also keep in mind that the added tension may cause the neck to bow slightly which may require a truss rod adjustment. Or if you have a trem the bridge may be pulled away from the body slightly.
Last edited by adambauman31 at May 16, 2014,
#5
Depends on what your talking about, acoustic or electric. On electric you probably wouldn't see that much of a difference with single note picking or even strumming. On an acoustic you may have to alter your pick thickness in order to get a strumming sound you like
(i.e. i dig in very hard on my picking, on an electric i play light top/heavy bottoms with a 2mm plectra and it gives me what i like without any problems, on acoustic i have regular and it doesnt work out for me, i use a .6mm nylon because with a 2mm its just too much)

Quote by adambauman31
usually the difference you notice is on the frets. they will be harder to press down.

+1
-Main Gear-
ESP Ltd V-401 + D Activator N&B
De Armond/Guild 2000 M72 Bluesbird w/ USA Toastertops
Peavey JSX & XXL
Mesa Boogie Rectifier Vertical 2x12
Airis Effects Savage Drive
Last edited by TYSHADOWS at May 16, 2014,
#6
Right hand is imo negligble. The left (fretting hand) will need to work a bit harder.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#7
I think the tighter tension might make it a bit easier for tremolo or very fast picking on low strings. I think I had gone from 9s (d'addario XL) to a set of 10s light top/heavy bottom (d'addario again) when I noticed though, which would make the difference more pronounced.
#8
Well, you need some tension for the strings not to take forever for the pick to glide over them. If the tension is too low, your pick will get stuck in the string until you push a far enough distance for it to bend off the pick and let go.

Meanwhile, I think you need enough slack for the string to be able to have slack to bend down to glide under your pick as well. Using different thickness of picks could help.