#1
Hi all,

I recently stumbled on the idea of target notes on the 12 bar blues. Ie: I= b3 on a one chord before the change to IV end on a b3 and it changes to a b7 of IV, then you can slide into the root of the IV chord which is D. Use the same b3 "blue note " concept for hte IV chord. V chord end on the P5 which turns into the root of the I.
This is great and really brings out authentic blues, focusing on Dominant 7 tetrachords.

what would the target notes of a major 2 5 1 or minor 251 chord chord be? Would it be the same for a 3 or a 6 minor chord in general?
Are there rules that would let me choose the right target notes on a 16251 etc.



knowing the chords of the lydian dominant and melodic minor scales? I have seen a few charts from a blues substitution column: [ C7 F9 C7 F9 F#dim C7 A7 Dm7 G7#9 Cmaj7 A7 Dm7 G7#9 ] and got a bit thrown off. Where does a m11 or 7#11 voice come into function?
Do I even think 12 bar for using melodic and harmonic minor?

all the best#
#2
This would be much better placed in Musician Talk; that's really where theory discussion should go, this forum is more for talking about the physical aspects of playing but we deal with small theory questions because most of them are pretty simple.
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#3
Quote by 094568029434geo
Hi all,

I recently stumbled on the idea of target notes on the 12 bar blues. Ie: I= b3 on a one chord before the change to IV end on a b3 and it changes to a b7 of IV, then you can slide into the root of the IV chord which is D. Use the same b3 "blue note " concept for hte IV chord. V chord end on the P5 which turns into the root of the I.
This is great and really brings out authentic blues, focusing on Dominant 7 tetrachords.


This kind of thinking is good, to think in degrees of the scale of what chord you're on and using passing steps and arpeggios to get from one to the next.

Quote by 094568029434geo
what would the target notes of a major 2 5 1 or minor 251 chord chord be? Would it be the same for a 3 or a 6 minor chord in general?
Are there rules that would let me choose the right target notes on a 16251 etc.


Very basically: chord tones land on the beat, everything else off the beat. A rule that all the jazz guys use is that when there is a iim going to it's relative Vdom, you can ignore the minor chord in your improv. So instead of playing Dm7 G7 | C6 for example, you can just think G7 | C6 and you're good. Easier on the brain too. Also chords I and vi are very similar - for example a C6 and Am7 are inversions of each other. So when the band plays
Cmaj7 Am7 | Dm7 G7 | Cmaj7 you could just do Cmaj7 | G7 | Cmaj7
Soloists also often alter the chords they are playing over superimposing one sound over another. So the band could play a Dm7 G7 | Cmaj7
and I could play Dm11(b5) | G7alt(#11) | Cmaj to give a new flavour.



Quote by 094568029434geo
knowing the chords of the lydian dominant and melodic minor scales? I have seen a few charts from a blues substitution column: [ C7 F9 C7 F9 F#dim C7 A7 Dm7 G7#9 Cmaj7 A7 Dm7 G7#9 ] and got a bit thrown off.
Where does a m11 or 7#11 voice come into function?


That blues progression you got there looks like a Parker blues; a blues form that Charlie Parker came up with. Many jazz standards use it. But there are far easier forms out there. Tunes like Freddie Freeloader, Straight No Chaser etc. There are so many. Check out the jazz real book. Check out the things I said above and you really don't have to play the sound of every change because some chords are so closely related that you end up doing it anyway. And also jazz is about that slight disagreement between the foreground and background which give it that hip sound.

A m11 chord has the same function as a m7 chord, it's just using more notes in the upper structure. The same with #11s, the chord's function will not change, just natural 11s on chords based on major triads in jazz sound ugly...so they sharpen it. That's all.


If you want to learn to improv in the jazz style; transcribe and check out how the greats did it and copy it. That's how you learn. And chord tones off the beat and passing steps off the beat is how they all think, they just get so good at it and are able to do it at lightning speeds. Please don't think modally. It's a different sound (much blander in my opinion) and get you really stuck when you're swinging at 300bpm. Every great jazz player uses much of the same principles, they all just sound different because they are individuals.

Check out Charlie Parker's solo here.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4mRaEzwTYo&feature=kp