#1
Well, this is one of those things that is easier to see than explain them, so I made a video: http://videobam.com/QwpNV
Starting from the 5th string, my pinkie "cede" under the force applied to press the fret.

I always struggled with this thing, when I play on the 1st string or the lower strings, especially with stretched hand figures, arpeggios, legatos, etc.

Someone has my same problem? How can I fix it? Or how can I contain it? In some cases, if I focus on posture, I can work around the problem, but there are figures that I just can not.
#2
Hey man, are you lefty? that threw me off for a bit.

The pinky is always going to be the toughest beast to control when it comes to your fingers. For some reason, god made our pinky fingers incredibly doofy and more difficult to control than your pointer, middle and ring fingers.

There are ways to build up your pinky control, but it's going to be a little bit robotic and will take some time. I'd recommend just doing hammer ons and pulloffs like you did at the very beginning of the video. Start with the ring finger down, and do some hammer ons and pull offs one fret up. Then use the middle finger, and do the same with the pinky, 2 frets up this time. Then the pointer, and the pinky 3 frets up. A few minutes every day of doing this and your pinky finger will be beastly in no time.
#3
Quote by Buttcheex8
Hey man, are you lefty? that threw me off for a bit.

The pinky is always going to be the toughest beast to control when it comes to your fingers. For some reason, god made our pinky fingers incredibly doofy and more difficult to control than your pointer, middle and ring fingers.

There are ways to build up your pinky control, but it's going to be a little bit robotic and will take some time. I'd recommend just doing hammer ons and pulloffs like you did at the very beginning of the video. Start with the ring finger down, and do some hammer ons and pull offs one fret up. Then use the middle finger, and do the same with the pinky, 2 frets up this time. Then the pointer, and the pinky 3 frets up. A few minutes every day of doing this and your pinky finger will be beastly in no time.


Very good advice! It also looks to me as if you're pressing down on the strings harder than you need to. It doesn't take a lot of force to push a string to a fret, so I'd recommend that you experiment with that. Play very slowly and try to figure out exactly how much force it takes, and lighten your grip accordingly. Apart from that, make sure you give that pinky a workout! The more you use it, the better it will be.
#4
Great advice above. I'd also recommend a few things:

1. Relax your shoulders along with your grip, it's all connected.
2. Don't be afraid to move the position of your thumb a little when making the stretch or using your pinky.
3. Cheat! You don't have to hit every note in the center of the fret. Let's say you want to use your pinky on the 5th fret, I'd finger it closer to the 5th fret than the center f the fret. This will cut down on the stretch a little (it's a game of micrometers).
4. Be patient. The fine motor skills in your fingers are developing, even if you don't think so.

Good luck to you.
#5
Quote by OdysseyOvShred
Very good advice! It also looks to me as if you're pressing down on the strings harder than you need to. It doesn't take a lot of force to push a string to a fret, so I'd recommend that you experiment with that. Play very slowly and try to figure out exactly how much force it takes, and lighten your grip accordingly. Apart from that, make sure you give that pinky a workout! The more you use it, the better it will be.


Well, I pressed down the string harder enough to give an evidence of the problem. Obviously it doesn't take a lot of force to push a string to a fret, but in some cases you have to, like doing legatos or if you care dynamic.

Quote by Buttcheex8
Hey man, are you lefty? that threw me off for a bit.

The pinky is always going to be the toughest beast to control when it comes to your fingers. For some reason, god made our pinky fingers incredibly doofy and more difficult to control than your pointer, middle and ring fingers.

There are ways to build up your pinky control, but it's going to be a little bit robotic and will take some time. I'd recommend just doing hammer ons and pulloffs like you did at the very beginning of the video. Start with the ring finger down, and do some hammer ons and pull offs one fret up. Then use the middle finger, and do the same with the pinky, 2 frets up this time. Then the pointer, and the pinky 3 frets up. A few minutes every day of doing this and your pinky finger will be beastly in no time.


Quote by Unstuck Guitar
Great advice above. I'd also recommend a few things:

1. Relax your shoulders along with your grip, it's all connected.
2. Don't be afraid to move the position of your thumb a little when making the stretch or using your pinky.
3. Cheat! You don't have to hit every note in the center of the fret. Let's say you want to use your pinky on the 5th fret, I'd finger it closer to the 5th fret than the center f the fret. This will cut down on the stretch a little (it's a game of micrometers).
4. Be patient. The fine motor skills in your fingers are developing, even if you don't think so.

Good luck to you.


Thank you guys for the advices even though I'm a bit skeptical and I tell you why. I play guitar since 1999 with ups and downs and the problem is still there. And there's a thing, the more I'm warm, the more the issue presents itself. Because when I'm warm, the pinkie is more loose. Since fingers don't have muscles, how can exercise strengthen joins? You can improve the impulse and than apply more force, but strengthen joins well I don't know. An orthopedist could help us

Obviously all I wrote is imho and I'll certainly do some pinky training, but i'm not so optimist
#6
There's a nice way to train control of all four of your playing fingers at the same time.
Place your palm on any horizontal surface and try to pick up and lay down your fingers in different patterns. The key is to control every movement.
It's not a "on-neck" excercise, but you can do it whenever you want to And it may actually help.
#7
Quote by dtpancio
Well, I pressed down the string harder enough to give an evidence of the problem. Obviously it doesn't take a lot of force to push a string to a fret, but in some cases you have to, like doing legatos or if you care dynamic.

Thank you guys for the advices even though I'm a bit skeptical and I tell you why. I play guitar since 1999 with ups and downs and the problem is still there. And there's a thing, the more I'm warm, the more the issue presents itself. Because when I'm warm, the pinkie is more loose. Since fingers don't have muscles, how can exercise strengthen joins? You can improve the impulse and than apply more force, but strengthen joins well I don't know. An orthopedist could help us

Obviously all I wrote is imho and I'll certainly do some pinky training, but i'm not so optimist


Hey man,

I think that's probably just negative thinking, because no matter what the pinky is going to be difficult. No matter how good you get, at fast speeds your pinky will always be lagging behind or ahead, not doing what you want it to. The key is just to try and work at it. F*** you, pinky!
#8
After several months of practice I'd say that things go better, not only with pinkie "gym" but also with keeping attention at the posture, trying to keep my pinkie in a hammer shape, and non perpendicular to the fingerboard but slightly angled.
#9
There's a lot of ways you can train your pinky finger, and using scales is a good example. Maybe you should start out with the minor pent or major scale. It doesn't really matter how you play these scales you could use your 3rd or pinky when practicing them. I think the major scale is a good one to start out with though. Just get a metronome out, and start playing quarter notes at a nice comfortable pace where it's challenging, but to the point where you know you can still play it perfectly, and under control.