#1
Hello,

I have a little problem with my soloing. I have no problem playing on a string fast and the synchronization between my hands is ok but where it starts to fail i when I have to switch string and maybe go to the B string instead of the high E string.
Are there any tips or exercises to solve this problem?
I'm trying to learn the faster part in the beginning of fade to black

Thanks
#2
it's all just practice. Keep playing it over and over again, practice exercises that switch strings. Don't stiffen your elbow, because it makes it harder to be precise
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#4
Also, playing with a metronome is helpful with keeping time which can help build you up to speed faster.
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#5
yes I always play with a metronome since I wanted to record something with a friend of mine and I could keep the time so I said: " I have to work on that"
#6
Yeah, using a metronome and slowing it waaaay down is the best thing you can do. You can't play something fast if you can't play it slow.
#8
Quote by Jayerrr
Hello,

I have a little problem with my soloing. I have no problem playing on a string fast and the synchronization between my hands is ok but where it starts to fail i when I have to switch string and maybe go to the B string instead of the high E string.
Are there any tips or exercises to solve this problem?
I'm trying to learn the faster part in the beginning of fade to black

Thanks


1) Always practice slowly and in a relaxed manner with a metronome. Speed comes naturally from good technique (I'd suggest 60 bpm as a starting speed). Every now and then, turn the metronome up until you get to your maximum CLEAN speed to test yourself.

2) Pay attention to your picking: I'd say that working with strict alternate picking is the best way to start as far as speed goes. Although economy/hybrid picking could have a higher speed potential (to some extent), I suggest alternate because you'll always be playing down, up, down, up, etc and won't have to think as much about which pickstrokes to use.

3) Work on discovering and fixing problem areas. In this case, you're having problems changing strings, so work on two string scale patterns. After that, try three, four, five and six string patterns. When you isolate your problem areas and attack them, you'll always have something to work on. Even our favorite guitarists have plenty of problem areas.