#1
Hi all,

Been looking into getting a microphone so I can record my electric guitar, but it would also be nice if it works nice with your voice. I've looked into it a little (correct me if any of this is wrong) but I think microphones normally need a preamp, but some already have that built in. I hear the Sm57 is good - not sure if it needs a preamp or not. I don't have an enormous amount of money, so I really want a mic with built in preamp,but I want something that will give me a decent quality. Also dynamic or condensor mic? Any help is appreaciated.

Thanks
#2
Assuming you want to record to your computer, I'd get the Shure SM57 and an USB interface (something simple, like an M-Audio M-Track).

The SM57 is a great mic. I've used them live multiple times, both for mic'ing up guitar and bass amps, and for vocals. There are better mics for recording-only purposes, but if you want a versatile and reliable all-rounder, the SM57 does the job.


Also, you'll probably get better help over at the Recordings subforum.

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Last edited by Linkerman at May 18, 2014,
#3
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
I've looked into it a little (correct me if any of this is wrong) but I think microphones normally need a preamp, but some already have that built in.
You're wrong.
You'll need a pre connected to a mic to make its signal powerful enough to be processed by more or less anything, but mics don't have built in pre's.
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
I hear the Sm57 is good - not sure if it needs a preamp or not.
If you're on the cheap, I'd get an SM58 instead.
Same thing + a pop filter which helps when you're singing through it.
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
I don't have an enormous amount of money, so I really want a mic with built in preamp, but I want something that will give me a decent quality.
What's your budget and what in the world do you wanna do with it, connect it to a computer and record stuff?
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Also dynamic or condensor mic?
For the price of an SM58 any condenser or ribbon mic will suck.
Read how they work on wikipedia.

Anyway, if you wanna record stuff to a computer you'll need an audio interface.
No, you can't just plug a mic into the mic in of your computer.
Well yeah you can but it'll not by any means sound any better than bad.
Go to the recording section and read the audio interfaces sticky.
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#4
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Hi all,

Been looking into getting a microphone so I can record my electric guitar, but it would also be nice if it works nice with your voice. I've looked into it a little (correct me if any of this is wrong) but I think microphones normally need a preamp, but some already have that built in. I hear the Sm57 is good - not sure if it needs a preamp or not. I don't have an enormous amount of money, so I really want a mic with built in preamp,but I want something that will give me a decent quality. Also dynamic or condenser mic? Any help is appreciated.

Thanks


All mics require a preamp to raise the signal to line level. I think you are confusing that with the difference between condenser microphones - which need an external power source - and dynamic microphones - which do not.

Since vocals and amplified instruments are two different animals, there really is no such thing as a "one microphone to do it all." Yes; people sing into Shure's SM-57 and seem to like it, but if you want truly first-rate recording of vocals, you want to go with a condenser microphone. They are a lot more sensitive, and they are better at reproducing the nuances of a good vocal performance. But you definitely do not want to use one with an instrument amplifier. They cannot take loud sound input too well. Put one in front of a cranked guitar cabinet and you will probably damage it.

Condenser microphones tend to be a good deal more expensive than dynamic microphones, though they have come down in price in the last decade. If you want a single microphone to cover everything, you might as well look at the old standbys: Shure's SM-57 and SM-58.
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#5
I'm gonna move this to Recordings, but leave a redirect in this forum. Good luck.
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#6
Thanks, and out of interest do you reckon you could use a guitar booster pedal as a kind of preamp. Or just use my guitar amp, to boost the signal then go directly to my computer?
#8
Don't doublepost, use the edit button.

Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Thanks, and out of interest do you reckon you could use a guitar booster pedal as a kind of preamp. Or just use my guitar amp, to boost the signal then go directly to my computer?

No, and no.

Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
And what's the main difference between the Sm57 and sm58?

They have slightly different response, but it's negligible, IMHO.
I own both, and I can't tell which mic I used to record what.

For live use, I prefer the SM58 for vocals since it sounds a bit mellower to me than the SM57; the SM57 seems to make my voice sound "sharper".
But I know plenty of people who prefer the SM57 for singing live.
To mic amps, I always use SM57's.
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#10
Quote by FatalGear41
They cannot take loud sound input too well. Put one in front of a cranked guitar cabinet and you will probably damage it.
Respectively yes and no.
They don't take it well means they will be more sensible, so more prone to be overdriven.
You don't have that problem with dynamic mics.

Though you'll loose your hearing before breaking a condenser mic because of a too high SPL.

Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Thanks, and out of interest do you reckon you could use a guitar booster pedal as a kind of preamp.
Yeah that would be a preamp, but you'd still need an analog to digital converter.
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Or just use my guitar amp, to boost the signal then go directly to my computer?
No, this you couldn't do.
Plus you would still need an analog to digital converter.

Read the interfaces sticky already.
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
And what's the main difference between the Sm57 and sm58?
The 58 has a pop filter, and that's the reason of the slightly different response.
Come on read what I wrote in the first place.

You can also detach the filter of the 58 so you have yourself a 57.
Well not exactly but if you wanna record a guitar amp it would do just fine.
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Quote by OliOsbourne
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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#11
Quote by guitarpro2play
For example a line 6 POD Studio UX1 costs as much as an SM58/57 and maybe even cheaper. Here is a result with just free VST plugins in reaper: (From my melodeath project, vocals with an SM58)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRZ-zKF74eo


a) There are better interfaces for the cash

b) That doesn't really answer the question and if he's after a microphone I'd assume he already has an interface anyway.


TS do you have an interface already?
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#12
I have an audio interface already ( I presume you mean software on the computer to record to/edit on) . And there is a lot of different opinions from people!
#13
No... an audio interface is a device that combines a preamp (or multiple) and analogue to digital converters. They are the most common method of getting a signal into a computer for digital recording, for those without the big bucks studio setups where pre's and A/D conversion are typically purchased separately for high-end configurations of various hardware.

Please read the stickies at the top of the forum page, they will answer a lot of your questions.
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#14
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
I have an audio interface already ( I presume you mean software on the computer to record to/edit on).

No, that's not an audio interface. FFS, learn to read! It's right on the first reply:

Quote by Linkerman
Assuming you want to record to your computer, I'd get the Shure SM57 and an USB interface (something simple, like an M-Audio M-Track).


It's an object that acts as a preamp for the mic and converts the signal to digital, then feeds it to the computer via USB:

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#15
Well thanks at least I know now! And yh I will look into getting an audio interface as well as a mic, cus I don't think plugging in through an AUX cable is the best idea. Yh im pretty new to this kind of stuff!