#2
The "Beat" is being subdivided into three.

They are counting each subdivision.

There are a certain number of beats in a bar (or measure) and they need to track what beat in the bar they are on. So if we have four beats in the bar and each of those beats are subdivided into three then they would count...

ONE two three TWO two three THREE two three FOUR two three
ONE two three TWO two three THREE two three FOUR two three
etc.

They are counting the beat as well as the subdivisions so they know where they are in the measure.
Si
#4
Alternative explanation but less likely explanation

You are being given groupings of equal notes. If the denominator in the time signature is 8, then 123223 would imply one group of one 8th note, one group of two 8th notes, one group of three, etc so that you essentially have a bar of 6 then a bar of 7

People like to mark scores this way
#5
Quote by bassalloverthe

so that you essentially have a bar of 6 then a bar of 7
People like to mark scores this way


I couldn't disagree more, the count could be in 3/4 or 6/8, it wouldn't be grouped into bars with different values. The the first count 1 2 3 would either be a bar of 3/4 and the 2 2 3 would be the second bar of the count in, or it could be 6/8 where it would be 1 2 3 2 2 3 as a whole bar. Alternatively in 6/8 it could be counted as 1 2 3 4 5 6 or 1 2 3 1 2 3.
#6
Quote by JNBloomy
I couldn't disagree more, the count could be in 3/4 or 6/8, it wouldn't be grouped into bars with different values. The the first count 1 2 3 would either be a bar of 3/4 and the 2 2 3 would be the second bar of the count in, or it could be 6/8 where it would be 1 2 3 2 2 3 as a whole bar. Alternatively in 6/8 it could be counted as 1 2 3 4 5 6 or 1 2 3 1 2 3.


uhhhh....

Well, theres really nothing for you to disagree with. Its not a way of counting every beat, its a way of showing groupings of beats. Its a common way for conductors to mark scores. 7/8=2-2-3. 6/8=3-3 or 2-2-2 or 1-2-3 or anything else. Conductors mark groups of 3 with triangles and groups of 2 with slashes.

Saying "3-2-2" is a common shorthand for signifying that a bar of 7/8 should be played as a group of three then 2 groups of two
#8
Quote by 20Tigers
^But is that what drummers are doing when they count 1 2 3 2 2 3....etc.


Is it a jazz drummer reading lead sheets and conducting a big band?

No worries, I know its probably not what OP is talking about, so I added the disclaimer. I just figured it was useful info
#9
1-2-3, 2-2-3, 3-2-3, 4-2-3 is a way to keep track of how many times it is being played.

As opposed to just counting 1-2-3-, 1-2-3, 1-2-3, 1-2-3 and eventually losing count.

If you do that shit 12 times it gets easy to lose count... but if you counted all the way up to 12-2-3 then you know how many times it was played and when to switch.