#1
I was just wondering if there was anyone out there who had just 1 guitar. Many of us own 1 guitar, but I wonder how many of us own just 1 guitar, which has a floating trem.

Having only 1 guitar which also had a floating trem makes it hard to switch tunings.

So the question is: How do you cope with the fact that changing tunings is very hard? Say you want to play along with some songs but they are in E flat. Do you adjust the screws in the back?
#2
I own more than one guitar.

I have one guitar which also has a floating trem that makes it very *easy* to switch tunings. It's called a Line 6 Variax JTV 89F (F is for Floyd). It's a modeling guitar that uses part of its electronics to produce pitch changes without ever touching the tension of the strings.

For example; you've learned a song exactly as written (say, "Don't Stop Believin' " by Journey) for a project. Leads and everything. The singer arrives and announces that he can't hit Steve Perry's high notes and needs to sing everything two stops down. With the Variax, you simply change the tuning electronically (either by rotating the alternate tuning knob to a preset or by performing a very quick "virtual capo" rest on the guitar...about 10 seconds). Then you play the song as you learned it, but what comes out of the amp is two stops down. Job done.

Let's say you're in a band that plays everything in Drop Bb, but you don't want to buy a 28" guitar and load it up with bridge cables just to do this. With the Variax, you just choose "Drop Bb" from the presets. What comes out of the amp is Drop Bb. No huge strings, retensioning, intonation hassles or learning to use a longer scale. When you're done playing in Drop Bb, you can go immediately back to standard.