#1
Hi! I just bought a pair of Audio-Technica ATH-M50, studio monitoring headphones, and they come with a 1/4" jack attachment. I was wondering what would happen if I plugged my headphones directly into my Taylor acoustic electric. Would that in any way be bad for it? I'm really not too familiar with the electrics in acoustic electric guitars and I don't want to mess anything up. Would it even play sound into the headphones?
Thanks so much! God bless.
Last edited by Isakale at May 20, 2014,
#2
pretty sure you'll need an amplifier to make that work.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#3
Quote by Isakale
Hi! I just bought a pair of Audio-Technica ATH-M50, studio monitoring headphones, and they come with a 3/4" jack attachment. I was wondering what would happen if I plugged my headphones directly into my Taylor acoustic electric. Would that in any way be bad for it? I'm really not too familiar with the electrics in acoustic electric guitars and I don't want to mess anything up. Would it even play sound into the headphones?
Thanks so much! God bless.
What exactly is a, "3/4" jack?

The large size headphone plug, is 1/4", the same as a guitar cord.

However, if the guitar is mono, (as 90+% are), you will only get output on one ear, as the phones will have a three segment male 1/4" plug. Ergo, one side of the phones is shorted to ground.

The guitar's preamp, turned most of the way up, will likely drive the phones. However, there is likely an impedance mismatch, which could possibly damage the guitar preamp.

Moral of the story, I wouldn't do it, and neither should you.

Many guitar amps have headphone outputs anyway, so why not wait and be safe, rather than sorry.

Quote by patticake
pretty sure you'll need an amplifier to make that work.
An "active" pickup, (which is a short way of saying a pickup 's output is being boosted by an onboard amplifier), would generate enough output to possibly drive phones. In the case of passive systems, either piezo or magnetic, most likely wouldn't.

It's another discussion, but since most low cost add on acoustic pickups are passive, that's the reason I never recommend them. The low output tends to produce a poor signal to noise ratio, and then there's the microphonics.

Of course if you're going to go all in with an after market active EQ system, by all means.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 20, 2014,
#4
Wow, that's so much!!! Yea, my bad, totally meant 1/4" jack.
That is really good to know!! Very thorough!
#5
There are all sorts of interfaces available.... mini headphone amps.... Hell, you can use your iphone or ipad by downloading any number of programs.
I bought an iRig for about 40 bucks and use it with AmpKit.
#6
Wow, cool! I'll definitely look into that. It'd be really cool because I don't actually have an amp, but I'd like to hear the guitar through the pick-ups and such, adjusting the bass, mid and treble.
#7
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#9
All of you good fore-posting people, listen up!

We're dealing with a full grown Taylor acoustic here. That being said, and with the exception of anything that is specifically designed as a headphone amp, none of these, "amplifiers", stand a chance in hell of reproducing the sound of that guitar, better than the guitar itself. That means, if you plug in, your sound will degrade.

As much as I am loathe to spend more of a member's money, than either they have, or can afford, in this instance, I'll make an exception.

Any "portable" guitar amp I've seen, has been a distortion generator, designed to give a junior metal head, something to plug into with his $99.95 Chinese Strat copy. In actuality, a distortion stomp box with a tiny speaker.

This at least since the first "Pignose" battery powered gem, by chance, crossed my desk when I was selling audio and musical instruments.

Personally, I don't think an acoustic guitar is served well by anything less than an 8" woofer, and if I had my druthers it would be at least a 10" driver.

So, shop wisely grasshopper, and don't spend all your money in the first store you come to.
#10
I can't figure out why in the world someone would want to listen to their acoustic guitar direct through headphones.... what's the point? It's still just as loud in the room, so there's no benefit there. The guitar will always sound better acoustically. If you're experimenting by using effects, then there is some benefit, but you can't accomplish that plugging headphones directly into your guitar in any event.