#1
Good evening everyone!


I was curious if folks used the same pics for both guitar types.


Thus far (beginner player) I have been using Fender Celluloid mediums and yellow Tortex's for both.


I just bought some Fender heavy's and some JazzIII XL's to try out. I'm hoping I get some playing time tomorrow.
2014 Gibson SG Special
Peavey Classic 30
Squier Standard Stratocaster HSS
Fender CD60CE
Fender v2 Mustang III
Roland Micro Cube
MXR M75
#2
I use the same and have a bucket full of mediums for all reasons and all seasons.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
I use Fender medium BIG triangles, (the pointy suckers), for everything. I've been using those for so long, I can't make do with anything else

However, I use the same picks in thin when: I'm trying to play very fast rhythm parts, or, I'm trying to play softly, or, I'm having one of my clumsy spells and I keep dropping the mediums. The sharp points on those picks can really dig deep down into the strings.

With that said, you should choose picks predicated on the sound you'd like to achieve. Heavies tend to be the most mellow, while the lights are the thinnest sounding and tend to "clatter" quite a bit. (And yes, the mediums are somewhere in the middle).

The bottom line with the acoustic guitar is, the type and thickness of strings, plus the pick, go together to produce the overall tonality. So, that's a matter of personal taste.

It's not like playing the electric where the choice of amp and the amount of gain are making most of the sonic decisions for you.

We get this question fairly frequently, and........."survey says", the most common answer is, "if you ask the question about which pick to use to a hundred different players, you'll get a hundred different answers". So, find picks that sound good to YOU, as well as being comfortable, to YOU.
#4
i use a variety of different picks anyway. there is nothing you can do to your guitar to change it's sound more than a simple guitar pick. it's always a good idea to have a decent sampling anyway(unless your a cranky old codger who refuses to give up that dinner plate you've been using since the civil war )finer points for more lead work, rounded tips for more strumming. thickness and material make a big difference to the guitars overall sound.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#6
Nope. When I use a pick on the acoustic steel-string, it's for bluegrass-type "flatpicking". I use the teardrop-shaped Dunlop .88mm nylon jobs.
Stiff enough for fast single-note stuff and produces a clear, ringing tone that's appropriate for 'grass.
Mostly, I use my electric (a semi-hollow) for fingerstyle jazz playing, but when I'm tempted to use the pick I use those little stubby Dunlop "jazz" picks in the 1mm size.
#7
Quote by stepchildusmc
i use a variety of different picks anyway. there is nothing you can do to your guitar to change it's sound more than a simple guitar pick. it's always a good idea to have a decent sampling anyway(unless your a cranky old codger who refuses to give up that dinner plate you've been using since the civil war )finer points for more lead work, rounded tips for more strumming. thickness and material make a big difference to the guitars overall sound.

WRONGO..., Dude! I've been using them since the Revolutionary War! I like how they match the shape of my hat....



"My pick it has three corners, three corners has my pick".............OK, now the girls sing it.....Now everyone...............,That's it, put your hands together........Awl raght !

Although, some styles are simply timeless....... Take "Paul Revere & the Raiders" for example:


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Last edited by Captaincranky at May 20, 2014,