#1
I'm learning how to tap with 8 of my fingers.

To those of you who have mastered the skill, or even have experience, what was your learning experience like? Is there anything I need to watch out for starting out, or is it smooth sailing? How long until I get proficient at the least?
#2
Practice it coming out of your amp. Don't want to get good then have to relearn it because you aren't muting properly.
#3
I've been practcing the standard scale shape on one string, all seems good so far. How to you branch off from there?
#4
Technically, you want to treat your right hand just like an upside down version of your left hand. Practice using both pulloffs and reverse hammer ons with your right hand, as they have different sounds and reverse hammer ons are a lot easier to get used to in my experience.

A good exercise with your right hand is:


-9-10-9-11-9-12-9-10-11-10-12-10-11-12-11-


Using each of your right hand fingers to play one of the frets. This way, you practice hammer ons and reverse hammer ons/pull offs with all the combinations of your right hand.

You also want to learn to tap with the index finger of your left hand. If you have decent left hand technique you should be able to tap with your middle, ring and pinky fingers quite well (hammer ons/pull offs) but usually you will be used to picking notes that you fret with the index finger. Get used to playing reverse hammer ons with your left hand too.

Apart from that, I'd just practice tapping songs. If you want to play two voices at once (like Stanley Jordan, Partyzant, Adam Fulara etc) then to begin with you'll want to learn the left and right hand separately and then practice playing them together. You will have to play incredibly slowly to begin with, but as with anything the more you practice the easier it will be to play two different voices at once.

If you are only playing one voice (shredding some multi finger tapping licks for example) then focus on getting your right hand technique down and then try to combine both hands into playing sequences with more notes on one string than usual. Again learn songs that fit the kind of technique you want.
#5
Very nice. I've got the left hand down. Time for good 'ol Jill...

Attempt at being funny ._.