#1
Hello everyone it's Danny here and today I'm here to pose a question regarding music composition.

What do you think matters most when making music, logic or intuition?

It is no surprise that there are very logical ways in music theory to create things such as good part writing and counterpoint. The benefits of using logic on the bad side is that it takes much longer than if you were to have just used your intuition. In the same sense that 1+1 is much faster to figure out than 25 x 46, using logic requires much more thinking and therefore much more time.

When we listen to a song do we need to think in order to know that we like it or do we just KNOW that we like it? I've seen people listen to albums and when they want to find out whether they like a song or not they simply fast forward through the sections of the song. If they like it then they'll save it and if not then they'll quickly move onto the next song. It should be no surprise that making music and listening to music are both highly related skills.

Is logic really a necessary prerequisite when making music?

There have been orchestrators and artists in the past that haven't known a word of music theory. They have hardly any knowledge of orchestration at all and yet they still create these magnificent pieces of music. How is it that such a feat is explainable in any other way than intuition?

When composing music should you simply forget all thought and simply go by what sounds good or should you disregard intuition and try to make it out of the use of logic?
#2
Quote by dannydawiz

There have been orchestrators and artists in the past that haven't known a word of music theory. They have hardly any knowledge of orchestration at all and yet they still create these magnificent pieces of music. How is it that such a feat is explainable in any other way than intuition?


I think they didn't know how stuff is called, but they knew how it sounded...so we could say they knew music at such a high level that thay didn't need to know the grammar to it?

I mean, I think it works in a similar way to a language.

As far as I know, to answer your question, I think it's likely that most of the composers write down the melody by intuition and than add the other instruments using theory.

Of course it's just a noob's opinion
Last edited by Michele_R at May 21, 2014,
#3
Read some John Cage

The two things you described are both valid, and each process will yield a unique set of results. It is up to you to determine how useful any result is.

By the way, one does not harm the other. Many free jazz musicians can still read music and talk theory like muther****ers
#4
Thats really a weak sided argument; "should you disregard intuition and try to make it(music) out of the use of logic?"

Sitting down and "writing" songs without either one of the two is just an exercise, when you really write music that comes from that special place inside of you its just gonna come out the way it does, the percentage of intuition is not gonna be defined.

When you really feel the things you're writing, your intuition becomes logic. The changes and melody are logical to you.
If someone were to change parts on a song that you wrote, sure there could be loads of different ways go at it in theory, but they wouldnt be logical to you.
Last edited by Ignore at May 21, 2014,
#6
Probably lots of feedback and unconscious processes at work when you write music. Theory can be just another influence, similar to the influence of a favourite artist.

When intuition fails you can use 'logic', as you put it.
#7
intuition requires logic to make its essence presentable to anyone who isn't inside your mind
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#8
Well theory is just the language to describe what sounds good, so if you are writing music that sounds good then you'll no doubt end up using theory anyway.
#9
Depends on your mood entirely. If you know your theory, it's more about form than anything else. All you really need to know is where you want to start and end a phrase, it's the in between where you get to be most creative. Or vice versa.