#1
Hey guys! So I want to record a cover of the song "We're not gonna take it"
This is technically my first recording ever and I'm a little new to the whole process. I've only been playing for a year. I can't seem to make my guitar sound professional enough to get a decent recording in. I'm playing both rhythm and lead and they just don't sound good together. I don't even know how to explain... I'm using a brand new B.C. Rich Mockingbird hooked up to a Digitech RP55 which is then hooked up to the Yamaha Audiogram3 which is how I get the sound plugged into the computer so I can record the sound. Does anybody have any tips to make my guitar recording sound more professional? Because I have absolutely no clue what I'm doing.
#2
Look up EQing tutorials on YouTube, and don't expect to sound good immediately. "Sounding professional" is really fvcking complicated, with many details, and tons of trial and error. Welcome to the world of recording and mixing. You're a real musician now.
#3
You need to play tight to the click, get a tight bass track. Setup the intonation of your guitar and tune it before recording. What I did for my last recording was to record DI tracks and use some nice free vst amp sims and cab sims on it. And, as Cavalcade said, google those EQing tutorials. I take for granted you have a backing track for your song.
#4
Obviously you need to play both tracks at the same tempo, and be pretty tight, or else it won't even sound like the song. EQ the rhythm track so that it has fewer high frequencies, and the lead track so it's has more mids and highs. At the very least they'll sit better with each other if you do that.

Also, I have an RP55, and while it sounds good live through an amp, it doesn't record well. Hold down the Drums button when you're powering it up to turn on the cab simulator. It'll make it's recorded tone sound fuller and less scratchy.
#5
Thanks for the tips everybody. I'll see what I can do tomorrow when I get the whole studio set up again.
#6
I'd just like to point out you're using a bottom of the line multieffects unit into an average-at-best interface. Completely ditch the RP for recording, just plug your guitar into your interface directly and use amp sims (we have a sticky on which ones to check out).

Also your playing needs to be tight, like, PERFECT. I usually track a part 3 or 4 times, the first time I just play to a click or backing or whatever. The next time I try to match the first as closely as possible. The 3rd time I mute the first track and try to match the second, and same with the 4th track. By this point my 3rd and 4th tracks are usually near perfect (and if they're not then it's time to do track 5/6/7/8/100).

Then, once you've got a good sounding amp sim and are nailing your tracks you're probably around 80% of the way to an okay sounding recording. Next you'll need to start learning about EQ which will take you past okay and into good. If you want pro, then expect to spend decades learning.
#7
Spend time playing different pieces or the whole songs together with your bandmates. Even if you think you're done and it's time to record - you never know what idea might visit you during one of these sessions.
It also helps to double-check every possible flawed places or dynamics of the song played.
#8
Quote by rootsofmy
Spend time playing different pieces or the whole songs together with your bandmates. Even if you think you're done and it's time to record - you never know what idea might visit you during one of these sessions.
It also helps to double-check every possible flawed places or dynamics of the song played.

I think he's doing this on his own. If I'm wrong though and there's other people involved then it makes knowing when you've nailed it pretty easy. If you still want to hang around your bandmates by the end of a rehearsal, then you haven't nailed it yet. To get a top notch sounding recording, you need to be picky with each other to the point where by the end you don't want to spend any more time with them than you have to for fear they might find something else to complain about. That, is when you've nailed it.
#9
Connect the guitar straight and use amp sims. The digitech will not record even just below well. If you want it to sound good the amp sims will get you way further. He'll I've gotten some amp SIMS to sound nearly as good as my kemper, though with much mixing work.
#10
Mix down your guitar recording and post a link to dropbox here. Me and I'm sure others will also give a listen and give you some tips on your first course of action regarding eq and effects.

Of coarse first make sure you have a cleanly played and recorded signal. Using amp sims may be a good idea. I use the Boss Me-70 multi-effects with cosm into an M-audio fast track interface with occasional vst amp sims and get good results but I have been doing this on a budget for a while so I know how to make Meh guitar sound like Hmm guitar.
Last edited by Victorgeiger at May 28, 2014,