#1
As part of improving as a guitar player I'm want to shoot 1 video per week playing the guitar. I adjust my training during the week to match what I want to record. The video will be discussed with my guitar teacher and as material for me to study my technique and to see and hear what works, why it sounds good or not, etc.

However, if some of the video's are a bit decent, I might upload them online and show the world. I've been reading a lot about recording and watched video's, but the more I see, the more lost I get.

I do have useful gear to record I think: I own a Boss Br800, a Blackstar HT5R combo and a Blue Yeti Pro microphone (and a camera/decent webcam of course).

Normally when I improvise over a backing track for example, I use the MP3 line in on my Blackstar and just start improvising. I've been experimenting a bit with the mic in front of the amp during an improvisation (with the camera running and using the sound of the Blue Yeti Pro), but it doesn't work too well. The main problem is that the mic picks up both the backing tracking and my guitar and blend them together. It becomes kind of 1 sound.

Other options
- Put the backing track on my Boss and record my guitar sound over a different track and film at the same time. Later I can blend the video and audio together? That means I have to play with my headphones anytime I record?
- Use the Blackstar emulated output?
- Other options?

I prefer a rather simple way because it will most likely be for myself and my teacher only. So the more I have to tweak, the less interesting it seems. However, the sound quality got to be good, certainly if they end up online.

What are your thoughts?

P.s. I've been experimenting a bit, also with editing software.
#2
I think headphones are your best bet. Run the backing track through your headphones on your computer or whatever and then record the amp's signal with the Blue Yeti while you film. If your headphones seem to cumbersome or ugly (and you're really that self-conscious about it), then get some little ear buds and run the wire behind you. Hardly anyone will see it

Another way is to run the backing track through your computer speakers and try to get as close as possible to the guitar's true sound with the blue yeti and then blend the backing track back in in post production.
Last edited by mjones1992 at May 22, 2014,
#3
I could ramble on about this whole processes but frankly a lot of people could do it better than myself, here is a youtube channel I enjoy and it's a nice introduction to learning how to record and use some of the tools to help you do it. Recording Guide Pt 2

If your want a brief summary I suppose that I would break it down like this, I'm not a pro at this so if people want to jump in and correct something by all means go for it.

- Plan out your arrangement and figure out what you want to do with the song, are you just improvising over a backing track or will you need to program drums, snyth etc?

- A separate track for each section you want to play will give you a cleaner recording and more control during mixing. This means separate recordings for each instrument that you are playing (1 for rhythm, 1 for lead etc.)

- Learn the basics of your editing software and mixing how to use them both effectively, this can make the difference between and "ok" recording and something that's studio quality.
Often in ones madness resides genius. Thus for a mind seeped in madness, the imagination is limitless.
#4
Thanks so far! The Boss understandably doesn't take pedals well. I thought it could be best to use the emulated output and connect it with my pc or Macbook.

I just tried a lot of stuff out and I connected my Blackstar with my laptop. I was able to to use the video of the webcam combined with the sound of the Blackstar. I think I should play the backing track over my computer speakers and record my improvisation. Later on I have to load it in software, load the backing track in the same software and mix them in a decent way. I think I should be there then!

And yeah, I have to get used to the software. That is what I'm doing right now
#5
Ok, I think I'm almost there, only question remain from now: with my camera recording software I am able to combine the video with the audio of the front mic of computer, where the amp is plugged in. I can capture my guitar sound well this way. If I'm playing a backing track over my amp and improvise over that backing track, I will get both sounds combined. So if I'm filming and want to record myself over a backing track, I'm able to get them all in 1 video. But that makes it 1 file that contains 1 video combined with 2 audio files.

The quality is way better than with a mic in front of the speaker. But I do have to adjust the backing track volume and my guitar volume in advance and it is all 1 file afterwards. I am not able to make any adjustments later on.

If I use my computer speakers to play the backing track and just capture my guitar sounds combined with the video, I'm able to add the backing track later on and adjust volume for example. But how do I get it exactly as I played it? Otherwise my whole timing is messed up?

Or should I make 1 file for the film and not choose any sound input, record my guitar in a daw (another file) , load the backing track afterwards (another file), synchronise that and then synchronise it with the video?
#6
I think I am finally there . I found this video what helped me out a lot! http://learningguitarnow.com/blog/recording/how-to-record-a-video-while-playing-over-a-backing-track/

I need a DAW with 2 tracks open, one with the backing track and one with the guitar input. Then I just play the backing track and make sure the guitar track is muted in a way that it is not played over the computer speakers, so I can just focus in the amp itself. After it is recorded I combined it with the video and synch it and done is the job! Can anybody tell me why the guy in the video combined the camera mic audio with the audio he recorded via his pc? Is it to make the sound a bit bigger/more roomy?
#7
Quote by GuitarL91
I think I am finally there . I found this video what helped me out a lot! http://learningguitarnow.com/blog/recording/how-to-record-a-video-while-playing-over-a-backing-track/

I need a DAW with 2 tracks open, one with the backing track and one with the guitar input. Then I just play the backing track and make sure the guitar track is muted in a way that it is not played over the computer speakers, so I can just focus in the amp itself. After it is recorded I combined it with the video and synch it and done is the job! Can anybody tell me why the guy in the video combined the camera mic audio with the audio he recorded via his pc? Is it to make the sound a bit bigger/more roomy?


It might be. Otherwise it might be room ambiance. A big part of music (in recording, anyway) is the room. If you're playing in a big room with hardwood floors, you want the recording to reflect that. Some nicer cameras have mics capable of capturing that and it's worth blending in. In most scenarios it isn't though as the average consumer digital camera doesn't have capabilities to capture room ambiance. Another way to do it, is if you have two mics to set one close to the camera and the other up to the amp and blend those tracks together.

If you need the track to sound bigger, double track it. Play it once for the camera and then again without the camera and blend both audio tracks together. This is often (like literally 99% of the time) used in studios to fatten guitar tracks. Basically, you will NEVER play anything exactly the same way twice, and when you blend two different takes together (that are perfect as far as the notes and bends go), you get a fatter track. I don't recommend this if you're using this as a tool to show your instructor how well you're doing and to have him critique you on what you are and are not doing right as you want to keep stuff like that as close as possible to a single take.


As far as your plan goes: That works. Follow what I tried to say in my first post (record the guitar's input or mic the amp so as to get ONLY the guitar's sound) while only listening to the backing track and then blend them together in your DAW. Then match that with the video and you're good to go.

EDIT: Mic placement is important too. Look up 'shavering' to get a good idea of where to put a mic up against the amp.

EDIT 2: Upon watching your video, he's only using his camera audio to align his video and audio. He's not actually using the camera's audio in the final video. He mute's the camera audio around 14 minutes
Last edited by mjones1992 at May 23, 2014,