#1
Hi, i'm Gnarrkhaz and i'm new here. If there's an introduction thread i should pay a visit to please feel free to tell me because i didn't see one (done!).

I'd like to gather some of the Emo tropes that i've observed over the years listening to bands like Mineral, The Gloria Record, American Football, The World Is A Beautiful Place And I Am No Longer Afraid To Die, Snowing, Brave Bird, Joie De Vivre, Algernon Cadwallader, You Blew It!, Prawn etc. etc. (Football etc. too)

Now, this is all stuff that these bands or some of these bands use (or i think they do) and it's all meant to make the lives of those who'd like to make such music a little easier. This includes me too so please feel free to share your observations as well. Personally i'd be very interested in chord voicings as i struggle with finding interesting ones. The observations don't have to be guitar related only. Also feel free to correct me if i'm simply wrong.

Also don't follow these steps like it's gospel and don't be content to just sound like everybody else (unless you're talentless like i who would be more than happy to get to at least that point :P). Mix and change these ideas in any way you see fit. This stuff is mainly intended to give ideas.

I'll also include some Guitar Pro tabs. If you want pdf versions of those, let me know in this thread.

Later posts aren't meant to bump the thread needlessly as i update it with more content now and then.

So, here's some of the stuff i've observed:


Major Scale:
I've found that most of above mentioned bands, if not all, play in major keys most of the time, if not all the time. So...there you go.


Arpeggiated ("twinkly") chords:
Pretty self explanatory (and pretty obvious for certain kinds of songs). Arpeggiate it, spread it out, make it sound melodic and, well...twinkly.

Examples:

http://topshelfrecords.bandcamp.com/album/keep-doing-what-youre-doing (Song: House Address (though you might as well pick some of the others))



Yelling:
Many singers do this and (let's be honest) most probably can't sing in the traditional sense anyway. But that's part of the charm. I like it at least. You can go all out as well, making it kind of screamo (although actual screamo probably would sound darker in terms of the music but that's splitting hairs).

Examples from subtle to extreme:





Droning:
Either let a single note drone while you play a melody or drone whole chords while varying the bass notes for example.

Examples for single note drone:



Example for droning chords:



Optional tunings:
examples include
FACGCE (open C with F (no5) (fourth step in scale) in bass)
(instead of tuning up i tune:
- A string 1/2 down
- D string 1 1/2 down
- G string 1/2 down
- high E string 1/2 down
- place capo on 1st fret)

DADGAD (Dsus4 or Gsus2)

DADF#AD (open D)

DADGBE (drop D)


Sus2, Maj7 (no3) and Maj7sus2:
These chords are quite prominent. The sus2 sounds very good with quite a bit distortion too. A good alternative to the regular power chord (which is the same but without the second note of the scale). Here are some voicings (Csus2):

E---------------- -------------- ------------------ -----------3--- ---------------- --3-----------
B---------------- --------------- ------------------ -----------3--- ---------------- --3-----------
G------------7-- --------------- ---7------------- ----0--------- -----------7--- ------5-------
D-----5--------- -----------12 -----------10----- ----0---------- --------5------ ------5-------
A-----5--------- -------10---- -----------10----- -----------3--- ----3---------- --3-----------
E------------8-- ----8--------- -------8---------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------

E---------------- --------------- ----10-----------
B------8-------- ------------15 -------------13--
G---7----------- -------12----- ---------12-----
D--------10---- ---10---------- ----10----------
A---------------- --------------- ------------------
E---------------- --------------- ------------------

The Maj7 (no3) is pretty much a power chord with an added seventh:

E---------------- etc......
B----------------
G----------------
D--------9------
A-----------10--
E-----8----------

The Maj7sus2 is basically a combination of the two above mentioned chords. It sounds quite nice:

E----------------- ------3--------- -----3-------- --7---------- ---10-------
B--------8------- --0------------- -----3-------- -----8------- --------12--
G-----7---------- --0------------- -------4------ --7---------- --------12--
D-----------9---- --0------------- ----------5--- -------10---- ---10-------
A----------------- ------3-------- -----3-------- -------------- -------------
E--------8------- ---------------- --------------- -------------- -------------

You can get the same sound/chord by playing the root chord of your major scale and adding the fourth note as a bass note:

E--------2------- --------2------
B------------3--- ------------3--
G--------2------- --------2------
D----0----------- ----------------
A----------------- ---------------
E----------------- ------------3--

Pretty common bass movement. The complementary interval to a fifth down is a fourth up so this right here would work exactly the same:

E-------2-------- --------2------- (there's that voicing again)
B----------3----- -----------3----
G-------2-------- --------2-------
D----0----------- -------------5--
A----------------- ----------------
E----------------- ----------------


Wind instruments:
Wind, especially brass instruments lend themselves very well to be used in this genre. Especially trumpets are prevalent. The full tone of those instruments works very well with the often arpeggiated, spread out guitar playing or thin guitar sounds. Composition isn't all that complex but simple. It's more like singing than dancing is what i would say.

Examples:




Climaxes:
This can be heard often as well. The climax is the most intense part of the song and is located at the very end. The entire song can build up to that point, the climax itself can be a build up or it's just a separate part or coda which Mike Kinsella of Owen is big into.

Examples:




CONTINUATION IN POST 27
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Oct 13, 2015,
#2
i love how dedicated you are to studying a genre that's dear to you.
#3
Quote by Ignore
i love how dedicated you are to studying a genre that's dear to you.


Thanks.
#5
Updated the original post with three more entries. Not expecting much interest but i need to write down my findings so i might as well do that on the internet.
#7
Build a bridge and get over it already deadsmileyface. It's getting old. If you really want to moan about someone being warned or banned for trolling I'm sure we can help you with that.
Si
#8
I thought it was an interesting read. Can't watch the videos right now, but will make a note to watch them later. About the alternate tunigns, you might be interested in a band called This Town Needs Guns (TTNG), as the guitar player often uses "custom" tunings and two capos (a normal one and a banjo one)
#9
Quote by deadsmileyface
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1657219

according to this thread, this type of discussion is not allowed on musician's talk

idk man, i'd be careful. mods might shut you down


What?

Not to worry! This guy was asking for advice regarding screamo or post-rock or whatever. That's an entirely different topic.

Speaking of genre: I changed the topic title in my first post because describing this here as indie seems wrong. Some people also might get offended . I can't change the actual thread title anymore though.

Too bad that what i'm talking about is described with this annoying emo tag. It doesn't even have anything to do with what was originally called emo as far as i know. Someone needs to come up with another word for it.
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Jan 24, 2015,
#10
Quote by Lersch
About the alternate tunigns, you might be interested in a band called This Town Needs Guns (TTNG), as the guitar player often uses "custom" tunings and two capos (a normal one and a banjo one)


TTNG is good but somehow their songs don't speak to me. I don't know. What this kind of music is concerned i like Clever Girl though.

Learning new tunings is always so much work :P. Also for now i think i'll use DAEAC#E for a while, properly learn it before i consider moving on. However i'm definitely interested in how and why you use multiple capos.
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Jan 24, 2015,
#11
Quote by Gnarrkhaz

Learning new tunings is always so much work :P. Also for now i think i'll use DAEAC#E for a while, properly learn it before i consider moving on. However i'm definitely interested in how and why you use multiple capos.


I often keep changing alternate tunings. For some time I was using open Dm, but know I'm using C#G#AEAC#, which I'm not really sure from where I pulled that one

The capo thing is that the banjo capo only covers 4 strings (I think). I never bought one to experiment with, though.
#12
I'm not into Emo but thanks for tips (no really). It's great that you made a serious guide to the style. I did something similar with Doom Metal a while ago. Hope you're own music turns out nice.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#13
Quote by RonaldPoe
I'm not into Emo but thanks for tips (no really). It's great that you made a serious guide to the style.


No problem. I was actually searching for a guide myself but couldn't find any serious help in that regard. That was frustrating as well as a little suprising. After all the whole midwestern emo revival thing should be big enough by now (of course i was into it before it was cool ) but apparently not. So i decided to make one myself even though that wasn't my original intention.
#14
Quote by Gnarrkhaz
What?

Not to worry! This guy was asking for advice regarding...
It is entirely different, that guy had a history of trolling this forum and it bit him in the ass because it became difficult to distinguish when he was trolling and when he was serious.

Honestly don't worry about it. You're fine.
Si
#15
I edited the original post because i made a mistake. DAEAC#E does play a Maj7 add9 no3 but the root note of that chord is a D, not an A. The tuning lends itself to playing AMaj though. Also strictly speaking it's not an open tuning. Sorry.
#16
D A E A C# E is an A/D

The bass note is D the root note is A.

A E A C# E is most definitely an A major chord. If you put that over an A bass then it's an A/D.

If you just add the D note in the middle of the chord it's an Aadd11.

Also when naming a chord such as Maj7 you don't "add" the 9th, the 9th is considered an extension. It's an add only if it is being added to the triad (no seventh). It's an extension if there is a seventh chord.

So something like... D A F# C# E would be DMaj9 and not DMaj7add9.

D A F# E on the other hand is Dadd9
Si
#17
Quote by 20Tigers
D A E A C# E is an A/D

The bass note is D the root note is A.

A E A C# E is most definitely an A major chord. If you put that over an A bass then it's an A/D.

If you just add the D note in the middle of the chord it's an Aadd11.


I just came to that realization today. Good thing you mentioned it. Aren't there seventh chords without thirds or why isn't is possible for it to be a D7Maj9 no3?

Also isn't A/D just another voicing of Aadd11? Why the slash nomenclature?

Quote by 20Tigers
Also when naming a chord such as Maj7 you don't "add" the 9th, the 9th is considered an extension. It's an add only if it is being added to the triad (no seventh). It's an extension if there is a seventh chord.


Why is that? What's the difference between adding and extending?

I despise chord nomenclature. It has never made sense to me and it seems unnecessarily complicated. But thanks for the help anyway.
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Jan 29, 2015,
#18
Well it is an A major chord and the D is an 11 but it's a very specific voicing where that D is to be played. The rest of the voicing just needs to be an A major.

A slash chord simply says play this chord over this bass note.
The way it works is [chord]/[bass note].

In your example you are playing A E A C# E (A major) over a D bass note so the best way to notate that is A/D. You could actually voice the A major any way you want so long as you put it over a D bass note. Notating the chord as some kind of Aadd11 would suggest that the D can be voiced anywhere in the chord but that A is the bass note.

The difference between add chords and extended chords is pretty much the seventh.

See how the 1 3 5 in the triad is harmonized in thirds? The root up to the third is a third, the third up to the fifth is a third

Effectively by moving up in thirds we select every other note...

If we have a triad then go up to the seventh then we are continuing the same thing by continuing to go up in thirds...

C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13...

If we take this "going up in thirds" idea and extend it beyond the seventh then we would go on to get 1 3 5 7 9...then 11...and finally 13. This brings every note into the mix.


When voicing the extended chords it can be problematic with so many notes to play - particularly on the guitar. The solution is that some notes are left out. You should play the upper extension but can leave out the lower extensions and it is still an extended chord.

For example a C13 might be played with or without the 9th and/or 11th. They (the 9th and 11th) are considered optional. The essential notes in an extended chord are usually the root third seventh and highest extension.

However if we have a triad and want to bring in a note (other than the seventh) then we are no longer extending the idea of harmonizing in thirds but instead would just be adding flavour notes to our triad.

So "add" is adding a note to our triad as opposed to extending our harmonization in thirds to include the seventh and beyond.

Ultimately the difference is the seventh.

If our chord is C major then the A note could be considered a 6 or a 13. If there is a seventh then we are extending the harmonization in thirds and would call it a 13. If there is no seventh then we are adding the 6.

Thus if we add an A to our C chord then we would call it a C6. We don't actually have to write in the word "add" because simply using the 6 instead of the 13 shows us that it is not some kind of seventh chord.

However if we use the 9 or 11 we have to use the word "add" to show that they are being added to the triad and that they are not part of an extended seventh chord.

So C9 would indicate a C7 that has been extended up to include the 9. Cadd9 is used to show that the 9 is not an extension but an addition to the C triad.

Hopefully I haven't confused you further.
Si
#19
Quote by Gnarrkhaz
I just came to that realization today. Good thing you mentioned it. Aren't there seventh chords without thirds or why isn't is possible for it to be a D7Maj9 no3?

Also isn't A/D just another voicing of Aadd11? Why the slash nomenclature?


Why is that? What's the difference between adding and extending?

I despise chord nomenclature. It has never made sense to me and it seems unnecessarily complicated. But thanks for the help anyway.

IMO Dmaj9 without a third does exist. The third can be implied without needing to play it. (For example a power chord can function as a major or minor chord - you don't need to play the third for it to be a major or minor chord.) It's all about context. The same voicing played in a different context can sound like a different chord.

A/D and Aadd11 are different things - A/D is an A chord with D in bass. Aadd11 has A in bass. They sound different. Add notes don't appear in the bass. And if they do, we just don't call the chord an add chord (unless the add note also appears on some other voice - I think that's when Aadd11/D could be possible).

Add chords don't have a 7th in them. If you add a 9, 11 or 13 to a 7th chord, it is called an extended chord. For example compare Cadd9 and C9. C9 has a 7th in it, Cadd9 doesn't.

Chord naming isn't that complicated. Mixolydian scale is the "basic scale" for chord naming. For example if the chord name is like F9, you just need to take the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th and 9th (2nd) notes of the F mixolydian scale and that's how you get the chord tones. If the chord has a major 7th (maj7), just use the major scale instead of mixolydian. For example Fmaj7 - you take the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th notes of the F major scale (because of the major 7th). If the chord name has an "m" in it, you just need to flatten the third. For example Dm11 - use the D mixolydian scale and flatten the third. Take the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th and 11th notes of the scale and remember to flatten the third. Or Gmmaj9. Now because of the "maj9" in the chord name, we use the major scale instead of mixolydian. The "m" in the chord name refers to the minor third - so we'll use the G major scale and flatten the third. Take the 1st, flattened 3rd, 5th, 7th and 9th notes of the G major scale and you get the Gmmaj9 chord.

Now remember that the scales I mentioned have nothing to do with what you should play over the chords. They are there just to make chord construction easy. You need to know 2 scales - major and mixolydian (which is just major with a minor 7th). Mixolydian is our basic scale because the 7th in chord names is assumed minor. So when there's nothing in front of the 7th, the chord has a minor 7th. It needs to be mentioned the 7th is a major 7th and that's when you use the major scale (or mixolydian with raised 7th).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#20
Quote by 20Tigers
Notating the chord as some kind of Aadd11 would suggest that the D can be voiced anywhere in the chord but that A is the bass note.

Okay, so that particular name is important because of the voicing although Aadd11 and A/D are the same chords with the same notes and the same root.

But since when does the voicing have an impact on how a chord is called? I've never seen anyone call the first inversion of an A chord anything different than just A.

Quote by 20Tigers
Thus if we add an A to our C chord then we would call it a C6. We don't actually have to write in the word "add" because simply using the 6 instead of the 13 shows us that it is not some kind of seventh chord.

So i could also write C2 to describe a major triad plus the second right?
#21
^ A major chord in its first inversion is A/C#, not just A.

The only thing that matters is the bass note. Otherwise the chord name doesn't tell anything about the voicing. If you just write Aadd11, it's not the same as A/D. Aadd11 means the bass note is A and the other voices have an added 11th. Aadd11/D would mean that the bass note is D and the other voices also have an added 11th. The bass note is not always a chord tone.

C2 could of course be used but people wouldn't necessarily understand what it means. Add9 is way more common.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#22
Quote by MaggaraMarine
^ A major chord in its first inversion is A/C#, not just A.

Ah!

Quote by MaggaraMarine
C2 could of course be used but people wouldn't necessarily understand what it means. Add9 is way more common.

It just seems highly inconsistent to me to say C6 on the one hand and Cadd9 on the other. Maybe it's because the sixth isn't considered a tension or something.
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Jan 30, 2015,
#23
^ I'm not sure about it but maybe it's because the triad has a root, third and fifth and you add notes on top of it, not inside of it. Of course this has nothing to do with the voicing - you can add the 9th right next to the root if you want to. But a 9th sounds less dissonant than a 2nd. And especially when we are talking about the 11th, it sounds a lot less dissonant when it is not in the same octave as the third. Major 3rd and perfect 4th are just a minor second away from each other and that's pretty dissonant. But an 11th sounds more consonant. But as I said, you can voice your chords the way you like. That doesn't really change the chord (unless you change the bass note).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#24
^yeah what he said - you start with your triad, then your seventh then anything else.

And you always name those first and always spell them first too.

Thus a triad 1 3 5 can then have anything added above it such as a 6, 9, or 11

But if you have a seventh chord 1 3 5 7 then you have to add stuff above the seventh so you wouldn't use 6 and you want to spell your seventh before any "extra" notes. So I you have a seventh you use 9, 11, 13.

Because you can have 9 and 11 as both add chords and extensions then you differentiate by writing "add" for the add chords and replacing the 7 with the highest extension for extended chords.

So

C9 is C7 with a 9 (C E G B D)
Cadd9 is a C with a 9 (C E G D)

However, with the 6 you don't use that number with the seventh chord. You spell the seventh chord FIRST then continue up to that note so it's a 13 instead of a 6.

Thus there is already a differentiation between an "add" 6 and the same note as an extension (which would be called a 13 not a 6).

So

C13 is a C7 extended up to 13 (C E G B (D) (F) A ) (the D and F are optional so this chord could just be ( C E G B A)

C6 is a C triad with an added 6 ( C E G A)

However if we add both a 6 and a 9 but no seventh then again the fact that we have written a 6 in shows that we are not talking about a seventh chord or we would have used 13. So Cadd6add9 is called C6/9. But don't let that slash fool you it's not a slash chord.

Yeah it gets crazy but it's really not that complicated if you accept that it is just a convention. It's what people have agreed on in order to name things and communicate ideas. If you get the hang of a few of these basic conventions then naming becomes easy. If you scratch your head too hard and want to know the logic behind it you will likely miss the boat.
Si
#25
Quote by 20Tigers
If you scratch your head too hard and want to know the logic behind it you will likely miss the boat.



We can agree on that.

Updated the original post again. Turned out the chord i originaly called Maj7add9 (no3) (which i learned is a wrong spelling) is actually a Maj7sus2. I could ask why it's not a Maj9 (no3) and someone could perhaps argue: because it doesn't have a third. My music theory book also says that you must not leave out the third in any case when playing such extended chords. Let's just ignore the fact that there are 7 chords without thirds (for example Maj7 (no3)). Guitar Pro confirms this.

Enough music theory for one day.
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Jan 31, 2015,
#26
^ The chord voicing doesn't need to have a third to function as a major or minor chord. As I said, power chords don't have a third in them but they function as major or minor chords depending on the context. So a chord like x 7 9 8 7 x could be called an Emaj9, depending on the context.

It is true that the third is very important and it's not the best chord tone to leave out because it can change the chord function. But as I said, it's all about context. Even if the chord voicing doesn't have a third in it doesn't mean it's not a major or minor chord. Many times leaving out the third makes the chord sound better when played with high gain distortion.

But yeah, I wouldn't call x 7 9 8 7 x an Emaj9 if we didn't have a context. I think Emaj7sus2 works well.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#27
CONTINUATION FROM POST 1


DAEAC#E:
This tuning plays a DMaj7sus2 when played open. It lends itself well to playing AMaj.

Again, because i don't like to tune up my guitar, i tune down like so:
- low E string 2 down
- A string 1 down
- high E string 1 down
- place capo on 2nd fret

Like with open tunings you can fool around by playing any open strings while pressing down notes in the scale (A Major). It's easy to get some corny sounds that way but that's always a challenge with this genre. I found that hammer-ons, pull-offs as well as slides on the lower frets work well when played fast.

The low E, high A and C# strings are tuned exactly as in the standard tuning, just 1 whole step higher, so voicings on those three strings that you learned in standard tuning work here as well. The three highest strings play a Major chord in a 1-3-5 voicing. The three lowest strings play a sus2 in a 1-5-2-voicing. Sounds fat if you need that. Playing it open the root note of this sus2 chord is a D which is the fourth note in the A-scale. To make a power chord out of that with a 1-5-1-voicing you just need to play the highest of those three string 2 frets lower:

E---------------- ---------------
C#-------------- ---------------
A---------------- ---------------
E--------2------- -------0-------
A--------2------- -------2-------
D--------2------- -------2-------

Of course this does not work when you play the open strings. You can leave out the highest note though. In that case it works with the open strings as well.

Major and minor chords with the root note on the lowest string are played like that (left major, right minor):

E-------2-------- -------1--------
C#-----1-------- -------1--------
A-------0-------- -------0--------
E-------2-------- -------1--------
A-------0-------- -------0--------
D-------0-------- -------0--------

(Because the fourth chord in a major scale sounds good both as a major or a minor chord the three lowest strings in both of the above voicings above can be played together with the three highest open strings. It sounds good in both cases.)

Here is one way to play the different scales relating to AMaj (A ionian, B dorian, C phrygian etc.):

ionian:
E----5--7----------
C#--5--7----------
A----4--5--7-------
E----4--5--7-------
A----5--7--9-------
D----7--9--11-----

dorian:
E---7--9----------
C#---7--8--------
A---5--7--9------
E---5--7--9------
A---7--9--11----
D---9--11--12---

phrygian:
E---9----10--------
C#---8----10------
A---7----9---11---
E---7----9---10---
A----9---11--12---
D---11--12--14---

lydian:
E---10---12--------
C#---10---12------
A----9---11--12---
E----9---10--12---
A---11--12--14---
D---12--14--16---

mixolydian:
E---12--14--------
C#-12--13--------
A---11--12--14---
E---10--12--14---
A---12--14--16---
D---14--16--18---

aeolian:
E---14--16--------
C#---13--15------
A---12--14--16---
E---12--14--16---
A---14--16--17---
D---16--18--19---

locrian:
E---4--5-------
C#---3--5-----
A---2--4--5---
E---2--4--5---
A---4--5--7---
D---6--7--9---

Tiny Moving Parts uses this tuning at least some of the time:


Here's another example, Algernon Cadwallader this time:


Overall this tuning is similar to FACGCE which i described above but i like this one better.


Tabs:
Joie De Vivre - Robert Muldoon
Tiny Moving Parts - Dakota
Joie De Vivre - Wait, Wait, Wait...How Soon IS Now?
Emo Side Project - I Guess Everything Reminds You Of Something
Free Throw - Now Kith
Tiny Moving Parts - Waterbed
Two Knights - It Sucks When You Hate Everyone
Joie De Vivre - The North End
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Oct 13, 2015,
#29
Hi i am new to UG , i decided to make an account after stumbling upon this absolutely amazing thread. I'm glad there's still people out there that actually know what real emo is haha
I am a huge fan of 90s-emo/midwest emo myself. I just love the way they sound and while listening to bands of the genre, I've noticed these tropes used as well! haha i thought i was the only one honestly
A certain band I love encouraged me to finally pick up the guitar, but the thing is, i'm a complete noob (like i just started playing about 2 months ago) and I have some questions about two things you listed here.
One of them being the arpeggiated chords and the note droning, can you give me some elaboration on how to do those two things on guitar? I went on YouTube but they don't really go into explaining DX Another question I have is barre chords really used or do you think i should use power chords instead?
#30
Holy necrobump.

Initiate thread murder.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#31
Hi grendel,

When you arpeggiate chords, you play the notes of that chords consecutively. For example a major C chord consists of the notes C-E-G:

E-----------------
B-----------------
G----0-----------
D----2-----------
A----3-----------
E-----------------

but rather than playing the notes all at the same time you play them individually like so for example:

E-----------------
B-----------------
G---------0------
D------2----2----
A----3---------3-
E-----------------

I'm not sure if the word "droning" is proper guitar terminology but what i mean by that is that you play certain notes all the time while changing others. For example you could play the root note of a scale, let's say the D from the major D scale, while playing any note of the scale over it:

E---------------------------
B--------------------2--3--
G---------0--2--4---------
D--2--4--------------------
A--5-(5)(5)(5)(5)(5)(5)-
E---------------------------

or you can keep a chord and then change individual notes above or under that chord.

@Barré chords: What barré is, in case you don't know: It's a way to play chords using the index finger to press down multiple strings at the same time. It could be hard for beginners but then again, everything is. It surely doesn't hurt to know some and i don't think barré chords are something which you categorically choose not to use. You use them when you need them. When you don't need them, don't use them. I encourage you to search google or YouTube for what's called the "CAGED system" and learn it. It basically tells you how to play the major chord of every note everywhere on the fretboard. Some barré chords are used there.

What i like to do is break down chords to their minimum, maybe add another string, and then play them that way, maybe arpeggiate them. The other instruments can add upon that to make it feel more full or even play some of the notes i leave out to complete the chord. I don't like to use barré chords to play rhythm, that's too campfire acoustic for me.

Also, what i learned (in fact years after having started to play) is that it's incredibly important to know how to play scales (using scale patterns) across the whole fretboard, or in other words, how to know where the notes of the scale you're playing in are. Without this knowledge it'll be hard to come up with stuff and even harder to improvise which is basically mainly how i come up with stuff. I'm sure it's similar for other people.
Last edited by Gnarrkhaz at Jun 19, 2015,
#33
Two new tabs added (post27), and i updated the entry on DAEAC#E and placed it in post 27 due to lack of space.
#34
Jet, don't do it. Not like this. Violence is not the only way

Wait, this thread is still up? I must have misunderstood the whole "thread murder" thing
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#35
I convinced Jet to bring it back up as i always add content whenever i post something in this thread. It's hardly a useless bump.

But you're right: Other than that, this thread is pretty much dead.
#36
I like this thread, Gnark'! It's always good to see someone with a lot of knowledge talk about a style that they love. I wouldn't be the biggest fan of the genre but I like a lot of bands that sound influenced by this style like Piglet and Colour. So what I like most about your lessons is trying to trace the lineage back to American Emo.
#37
Quote by Declan87
I like this thread, Gnark'! It's always good to see someone with a lot of knowledge talk about a style that they love.


I agree. I don't know nearly enough about the genre to contribute, but the thread is still great.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#38
emo is gr8

I've been listening to a lot of The Appleseed Cast's Mare Vitalis. Awesome drumming and sound altogether. kind of a prequel to the post-rock emo of TWIABP!AIANATD.

also i started really looking at mineral's lyrics. loads of christian metaphors describing various relationships and the insecurities of making mistakes all the time. it confused me at first but a bunch of it works pretty well.

emo is gr8 and twinkles are awesome
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#39
@Declan87 and Kevätuhri: Cool, thanks!

Quote by Baby Joel
emo is gr8


I could tell that you feel that way by your avatar.