#1
Hey I just bought an epiphone les paul studio in worn brown finish recently.
So i was trying to play sth and I noticed that when I lightly fret the strings, a sound is produced through the amp without me even plucking the strings.
Is this normal?
And also my strumming seems to sort of slice through the sound from the amp and is very audible
is there anything i can do to fix it if theres a problem
#2
Quote by GitBit
Can someone please reply asap...


This is a forum and you are, contrary to what you think, not in that much of a hurry. Wait. People will come when they have things to say.


The being able to hear the strings when you're playing through an amp is just something you're going to have to get used to; some guitars are very acoustically loud. If you're playing a show or something that won't matter at all anyway.

The other thing... what kind of sound is it? Hum? Buzz? Notes?
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#3
Could be you pick, your picking technique, etc.
How high is the volume on the amp & guitar?
#5
It sounds like your hearing the effect of a "hammer-on". This is when you are fretting strings and you can hear the note without strumming.

Or is this a buzz,hum type noise?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
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#6
When you fret a note, the string will hit the fret a fraction of a second before your finger anchors the string against the fretboard. Depending on how sensitive your pickups are, and how strong the signal into your amplifier is, this "fret strike" can be quite noticeable. If your string action is very low, it tends to accentuate this effect. So does playing at loud volumes, or with tons of gain on your amplifier. Sometimes a good noise gate/noise suppressor can help eliminate this problem.
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#7
Oh okay
thank you for the advice
Its what robbgnarly said.. the hammer on effect
Btw what exactly is a noise gate?
#10
I run into that occasionally, if I get sloppy. Your finger on the string should mute the note until JUST before you play it, at which point your finger frets the note just as you pick. This is a technique issue, and you'll develop the technique with time. Try playing everything as hammer-ons for a while. When you can do that cleanly, you're there.

Pick noise is something I just deal with. I like thick acrylic picks with sharp points (2mm and 3mm Gravity Picks "Razer" series in standard size, if you're interested). There's a bit of a "tick" when I hit the note. Very definitive attack. If I can't stand it for some reason, I'll sometimes play with the edge of my thumb, as if I had a pick there. Softer attack, and once you've developed the callous you need, it's quite nice.
#11
Quote by dspellman
I run into that occasionally, if I get sloppy. Your finger on the string should mute the note until JUST before you play it, at which point your finger frets the note just as you pick. This is a technique issue, and you'll develop the technique with time. Try playing everything as hammer-ons for a while. When you can do that cleanly, you're there.

+1
This is what I was going to say
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate