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#1
I am having a lot of trouble understanding and executing this style of vibrato; evidently, the door-hinge analogy is not sufficient. Could anyone demonstrate this technique in a clearer manner?
#2
I would love help with this also. I imagine you do vibrato by flexing your fingers? I also bend using my fingers rather than my wrist, which is also sub-optimal...
#3
Try this: anchor your thumb to the top of the neck, then pull your arm downwards, then return to pitch and repeat. Or, pressing rather hard on the strings, wriggle your arm as if you were flipping your hand from the back of your palm to he side of your hand.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#4
Quote by Archer250
Try this: anchor your thumb to the top of the neck, then pull your arm downwards, then return to pitch and repeat. Or, pressing rather hard on the strings, wriggle your arm as if you were flipping your hand from the back of your palm to he side of your hand.


Is this only to bend the string downward? I'm not sure I get it
#5
Quote by Archer250
Try this: anchor your thumb to the top of the neck, then pull your arm downwards, then return to pitch and repeat. Or, pressing rather hard on the strings, wriggle your arm as if you were flipping your hand from the back of your palm to he side of your hand.


I'm afraid I do not understand that description either.
#6
I've heard the description once that one might try to 'paint' the entire room between the frets with their finger (this means the spot that your finger is when fretting a note, do not go over the fret of your note nor the one below it). So the finger remains flexible, and as your arm/wrist moves slightly from left to right as if doing the one-handed nasty by yourself, so that the tip of your finger is rolled from one side onto the other (being left and right side, not nail and fleshy part). Whether you leave your thumb on the back of the neck or not is up to you, I've seen it done both ways even by professionals, and before you put any rules on technique for yourself getting the sound right is more important. A technique that has no audible results is not a technique.

Also something of note, when doing vibrato by 'bending' the string, you are only pushing or pulling the note upwards. Pushing being when you push the string towards your face, and pulling being when you are pulling the string towards your fretting hand. The note cannot go down in frequency, because you are only raising the tension on it whether you use either of these movements.

Actual vibrato should also lower the tension of a string. When performing vibrato, you gently swing your hand towards the head of the guitar, and towards the body. By doing this, you are gently pulling the string a bit in those directions, when towards the body you should hear a very slightly lower tone than before, and it should raise once more when releaving the pressure. When moving the hand towards the head of the guitar, you are pulling it. A bend cannot lower the frequency because it cannot lower the tension of a string, so while to the untrained ear it can be performed and seem similar it is in fact not the same sound. A bend raises the frequency and can release it to it's normal tone, vibrato should 'circle' around the base frequency of the note.

I hope it's been of some help, good luck.
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Last edited by FretboardToAsh at May 24, 2014,
#9
Quote by RyanMW2010
I also bend using my fingers rather than my wrist, which is also sub-optimal...


Whilst you definitely need to learn to bend with your wrist there are some people who have some ****ing incredibly finger vibrato. eg:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXMJnltcTzQ

Some of dat finger vibrato (particularly around 8 seconds)... hnnnnngg. Of course, not all of us are from Sweden.
Last edited by vayne92 at May 24, 2014,
#10
It's weird,I never had a problem with this,I struggled with other stuff though.The main thing with vibrato is to LISTEN to the pitch,Just try to make it sound how you hear it in your head,However you do it.Vibrato is one technique that can differ from person to person and can help define your personal 'style'
#11
If you want to know about the mechanics then I suggest watching this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqnuEeQ7rNs

The first thing Satch talks about is bending but the mechanics when it comes to vibrato are exactly the same, vibrato is just repeatedly and quicker.
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#12
I am still unable to "lift" the string without moving my fingers to apply vibrato in the manner that most guitarists do.
#13
Quote by metal_zelda
I am still unable to "lift" the string without moving my fingers to apply vibrato in the manner that most guitarists do.


Vibrato takes a long long long time to develop. I 100% believe it takes longer than any other technique to develop and takes the longest to master as well, even though i hate saying "master" when talking about guitar techniques, and especially when talking about vibrato. It's not going to come overnight unfortunately, but stick at it and over time it will improve.
#14
Quote by vayne92
Vibrato takes a long long long time to develop. I 100% believe it takes longer than any other technique to develop and takes the longest to master as well, even though i hate saying "master" when talking about guitar techniques, and especially when talking about vibrato. It's not going to come overnight unfortunately, but stick at it and over time it will improve.


IME, once you've developed it, you will never lose it
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#15
Quote by Archer250
IME, once you've developed it, you will never lose it


You wont, but you can say that for most guitar techniques. Vibrato i guess more so just because it's used in literally every style of music in existence basically.
#16
Quote by vayne92
You wont, but you can say that for most guitar techniques. Vibrato i guess more so just because it's used in literally every style of music in existence basically.

I do not mind practicing a technique; rather, the problem here is that I am unable to execute the technique properly. There is no point in practicing applying wrist vibrato in an incorrect manner, after all.
#17
Quote by vayne92
It's not going to come overnight unfortunately


I dunno. I think mine did. One day I couldn't do it and the next something just clicked and I could.

That's not to say I haven't worked at it since and improved it, but the basic "can I do it or not?" thing was, for me anyway, an overnight thing.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#18
Quote by metal_zelda
I am still unable to "lift" the string without moving my fingers to apply vibrato in the manner that most guitarists do.


Question is... why? What exactly is stopping you?

I'm not being a jerk, this is a very important question.
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Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#19
^ pressing too hard? you don't (or at least I don't ) really lift the string, it's still in contact with the fret or you wouldn't hear any sound. but if you're pressing really hard I imagine that wouldn't help.

it's kind of hard to advise because a lot of these things are sort of second nature and you do them without thinking about it.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#20
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ pressing too hard? you don't (or at least I don't ) really lift the string, it's still in contact with the fret or you wouldn't hear any sound. but if you're pressing really hard I imagine that wouldn't help.

it's kind of hard to advise because a lot of these things are sort of second nature and you do them without thinking about it.


Yeah, that's pretty much why I'm asking; I have basically no idea what someone might be having trouble with in this context
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#21
yeah
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#22
Quote by vayne92
Whilst you definitely need to learn to bend with your wrist there are some people who have some ****ing incredibly finger vibrato. eg:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXMJnltcTzQ

Some of dat finger vibrato (particularly around 8 seconds)... hnnnnngg. Of course, not all of us are from Sweden.


To look at this guy for bending and vibrato would be my recommendation too. His version of the loner is probably the best out there. Much bending such control, wow.
#23
Quote by Dave_Mc
I dunno. I think mine did. One day I couldn't do it and the next something just clicked and I could.

That's not to say I haven't worked at it since and improved it, but the basic "can I do it or not?" thing was, for me anyway, an overnight thing.


Same for me with circular vibrato
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#25
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Question is... why? What exactly is stopping you?

I'm not being a jerk, this is a very important question.


I am not able to move my wrist in a manner that results in string movement. Instead, my fingers just pivot over the top of the string. I have tried pressing down with varying degrees of pressure, and none of them produce the desired result.
#26
Your best hope of correcting the problem with our help is to post a video of yourself playing
#28
Quote by RyanMW2010
I don't meant to hijack this from Metal, but I think we have very similar problems. Here's a video of my playing where I bend using finger strength only. I just can't get the wrist bending/vibrato, either. Hopefully this helps you also, Metal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IV80Sb9upjw


Yes, your vibrato is weak and your bends sound hallow because you are bending with your fingers instead of your wrist. To adjust this just keep your fingers on the note you want to bend/vibrato (the more fingers behind it, the better), hold the note firmly, and bend with your wrist.
#29
thanks hansome, but I think I'll need a little more than that. I've tried bending with my wrist and I just can't get it for some reason.
#30
^ Use your fingertips less. Playing with your fingertips is great if you're playing complex chords, classical and stuff like that, but it doesn't give you much purchase on the strings for bends and (rock-style) vibrato. Put your fingers flatter on the string for leads- not completely flat or you'll make the other strings ring out, but sort of at an angle so you get more of a good hold on the string, while also not making the other strings ring out.

Quote by Archer250
Same for me with circular vibrato


yeah it's definitely possible. i've never bothered trying to do circular.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at May 26, 2014,
#31
This is getting no where.

Someone who needs help post a video of yourself trying to do the vibrato technique in question. It's impossible to tell what you're doing wrong without seeing it since you're incapable of describing it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#32
I have finally figured it out. For posterity's sake, I find it helpful to view my hand as if it were attached to the 15 mark of a clock. If I want to move the string upwards, I do a quarter turn towards the zero mark (counter-clockwise movement) and if I want the string to move downwards, I do a quarter turn towards the thirty mark (clock-wise movement).

On a final note, does anyone know of a good exercise to practice vibrato? A song perhaps?
#33
Quote by metal_zelda
On a final note, does anyone know of a good exercise to practice vibrato? A song perhaps?


Literally anything with single note lines. Ever.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#34
^ This, just practice using different width vibratos with different fingers fretting the note and you'll be golden after enough practice.

Honestly there seems to be a circlejerk on UG that vibrato is this special crazy hard to learn technique that makes all your playing sound perfect. A good vibrato will make you sound better but it's one of many techniques in your arsenal, and honestly it definitely isn't the hardest one to "master" (players like BB King have amazing vibrato but the rest of their technique is nothing special).

That being said, it's highly worth learning. Just don't buy into people saying that a good vibrato will fix everything about your playing.
#35
Quote by Anon17

(a) Honestly there seems to be a circlejerk on UG that vibrato is this special crazy hard to learn technique that makes all your playing sound perfect. A good vibrato will make you sound better but it's one of many techniques in your arsenal, and honestly it definitely isn't the hardest one to "master" (players like BB King have amazing vibrato but the rest of their technique is nothing special).

(b) That being said, it's highly worth learning. Just don't buy into people saying that a good vibrato will fix everything about your playing.


(a) I always wonder about it, too. I didn't find vibrato that hard, but then again if you listen to a lot of players an awful lot seem to have problems with it. I dunno what's going on there- whether I'm just lucky and that's the thing I happened to find easy, whether other players are practising the wrong things or approaching it the wrong way, or what.

I suppose if a lot of people have problems with something you could argue it's difficult.

(b) I'd say it'll fix a lot of things about your playing. If you're talking about rock-style vibrato, at least (and for general rock/blues-style playing, it might not improve your classical playing much).

I mean, it's pretty hard to have a good (rock-style) vibrato without being able to bend in tune (so having a decent ear), having good timing, and also having some musical sensibility (i.e. which notes to vibrato and how wide to vibrato them etc.).

Almost by definition if those things are good then it'll help your overall playing (unless you already were pretty good at them).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#36
Quote by Anon17
A good vibrato will make you sound better but it's one of many techniques in your arsenal, and honestly it definitely isn't the hardest one to "master" (players like BB King have amazing vibrato but the rest of their technique is nothing special).



To me and many others BBkings vibrato is an example of what not to do. He just tries to do it as fast as possible without actual control. Mastering the controlled type of vibrato is what makes it hard for most, that's the reason for the circlejerk.
#37
IMO, BB King is a good example of some of the worst things you could do to your fingers.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#38
BB has a very good sounding vibrato,However,He does'nt use it with bends,Which is tougher to do and keep good pitch.
#39
I can do pretty good with my wrist or fingers. When using the wrist, get your thumb over the top and comfy grip, not too much tension, arm and elbow free. Using the fingers when thumb is behind, takes a bit more practice and is easier with subtle stuff
#40
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) I always wonder about it, too. I didn't find vibrato that hard, but then again if you listen to a lot of players an awful lot seem to have problems with it. I dunno what's going on there- whether I'm just lucky and that's the thing I happened to find easy, whether other players are practising the wrong things or approaching it the wrong way, or what.

I suppose if a lot of people have problems with something you could argue it's difficult.

(b) I'd say it'll fix a lot of things about your playing. If you're talking about rock-style vibrato, at least (and for general rock/blues-style playing, it might not improve your classical playing much).

I mean, it's pretty hard to have a good (rock-style) vibrato without being able to bend in tune (so having a decent ear), having good timing, and also having some musical sensibility (i.e. which notes to vibrato and how wide to vibrato them etc.).

Almost by definition if those things are good then it'll help your overall playing (unless you already were pretty good at them).



Personally, it's attention to detail. When I'm listening to a tune or a lead line, I'm not just listening to the notes played but the vibrato, the pick attack etc... Even when I first started out, a bad vibrato was something that really stuck out and sounded amateurish to me so I started to focus more on working that out. Testing different styles with backing tracks and just getting a feel for it via trial and error until I felt comfortable. I don't even really think about it anymore, I just automatically use vibrato that I like.


It's simple, but it's not as simple as just shaking the string lightly out of pitch. Proper vibrato control involves listening to what you're playing and making it fit within that context. There are times when I hear people doing a really quick and shallow sounding vibrato in a slower tune which would probably benefit more from a wider, slower vibrato and vice versa.


Basically I'm saying practice.
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