#1
Allright everything below might be very funny to an experienced guitarist so don't laugh =)

I've been today in a shop and tried 5 different guitars. Most of them were chinese Fender copies (I'm going to buy a cheap guitar). Despite the horrible sound and bent neck, I could play somehow easily.

But then I decided to grab a real Epiphone SG Pro (this is how it was written on it). The sound, noise level, the distance between the strings and the neck - everything was much better.

But I realized one strange problem. My fingers (on the left hand, I'm right-handed) were muting the strings. So, when I was playing some chords, the strings nearby sometimes were occasionally muted. I felt like my fingers became really fat. I felt terrible and though I really liked that Epiphone I decided not to buy it due to that thing.

So what's the reason for that? Probably that's because the strings are closer to each other on Epiphones? If so - is there any common Epiphone model that has a larger distance? At my place, there are just a few guitar shops and I'm limited in time and choice and can't simply go and test 50+ Epiphones\Gibsons. From what I saw and hear in that shop, I really liked Epiphones, but I'm really confused about my inability to play cleanly on that guitar.
#2
It's unlikely that it was any different -- most manufacturers are using 1 11/16" wide nuts these days, and the string spacing is pretty standard, with the exception of some of the Gibsons with "nibs."

If you have a guitar with low action, you should be able to fret a note more easily than one with high action (more distance between the strings and the frets). There's also this: some Fenders (and their clones) have a fairly rounded radius (the top of the fretboard is more rounded from side to side). That might have something to do with what you're running into.
#3
For those who don't know what Epiphone is - it's a Gibson child brand manufactured in Asia. Some people say they are well-built and really similar to the original Gibsons.
#4
Quote by dspellman
It's unlikely that it was any different -- most manufacturers are using 1 11/16" wide nuts these days, and the string spacing is pretty standard, with the exception of some of the Gibsons with "nibs."

If you have a guitar with low action, you should be able to fret a note more easily than one with high action (more distance between the strings and the frets). There's also this: some Fenders (and their clones) have a fairly rounded radius (the top of the fretboard is more rounded from side to side). That might have something to do with what you're running into.


Ok thanks. The feeling of 'fat' fingers was just too real. I mean, though the 'action' was even lower on the Epiphone, I had real issues playing Metallica's Sanitarium intro (you know it's pretty simple, but I did it really terrible).

The Fenders' necks felt more flat while Epiphone felt more rounded. So I think Epiphone's one should have a less radius. In other words, Epiphone was more rounded, I believe.

I tried 4 'Fenders' and I felt no difference between their necks... So that's why I thought it's more about that Epiphone than about these Fenders =(
#5
Quote by abassaka
For those who don't know what Epiphone is - it's a Gibson child brand manufactured in Asia. Some people say they are well-built and really similar to the original Gibsons.

I think most people here are familiar with Epiphone

I have a Epiphone G-400 vintage that is just fine. I think what you were experiencing was more of a technique issue combined with a set-up issue.

Get the guitar you are most comfortable playing and have it set-up by a good tech.

Epi's have a 12" radius typically and fenders/Squiers have 9.5" typically, so the epi will feel flatter
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
Last edited by Robbgnarly at May 24, 2014,
#6
Quote by Robbgnarly
I think most people here are familiar with Epiphone

I have a Epiphone G-400 vintage that is just fine. I think what you were experiencing was more of a technique issue combined with a set-up issue.

Get the guitar you are most comfortable playing and have it set-up by a good tech.


Dunno if Epiphones are exported from Asia, so wrote about it =)

The issue is that the setup was fine. I believe it. The distance between the strings and the neck was fine. The guitar was tuned. The strings were somehow average - not very thin and not very thick. Every single thing was fine except that muting =(

Also, though I'm a beginner, I played various acoustic guitars and some electric ones (cheap Samick). And they did not fill that strange, as well as those cheap Chinese 'Fenders'. I don't really think it's about technique. It's far from perfect but why then I had no such issues playing cheaper guitars? I just can't accept the idea that I have to buy a Chinese piece of wood just because I got used to them :-)
#8
maybe that's because the neck on the epi is wider, so you don't keep your fingers as perpendicular to the fretboard as you use to do on a strat

that guitar is like falling in love with a stripper
Silmeria
Valkyrie
modded Squier Strats
#9
Quote by billyTheShears
maybe that's because the neck on the epi is wider, so you don't keep your fingers as perpendicular to the fretboard as you use to do on a strat

+1
My G-400 has the widest fret-board of any guitar I own, one reason I like it.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate