#1
The inevitable demotivated thread.
S, tl:dr version, playing 8 years, had a teacher for at least half of those and was playing like a boss (what I considered to be boss-like levels). Uni and store closure (where my lessons took place) happened. Now I'm on my own, trying to fix the mistakes that were never fixed and it seems I can't do what I used to be able to do, which is not cool. Is it really just practice scales and chords till your fingers bleed?

I don't appear to be making much progress at all, my technique's a little better, but I still seem incapable of actually playing (just have a look through my post history). When I see other people who've achieved so much more than I have in an 8th of the time, instead of encouraging me it does the opposite. If I check out a video of someone playing what I'm trying to play, I end up thinking, 'Yeah, that's not happening and put the guitar back down again.

I haven't given up, don't think I ever will, but at the same time I don't feel like I'll reach the mountain top as I'm too musically inept in some areas. So, how do you keep the motivation up??? That spark from when I first picked up a guitar over 10 years ago doesn't seem to be there anymore (couldn't put the thing down)

Sorry to be such a downer guys :/
#2
You have to enjoy playing music at your current level. If you're 100% focused on your destination you won't enjoy the journey.
#3
Most important realisation:

There is no mountain top. There is no destination. There is always someone who's better at something than you and they also have people they look up to and want to be like.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#4
I also don't believe you'll ever be good enough. There'll always be things you think you do badly or could do better when comparing to others, and especially with youtube you'll see some of the most talented youngsters in the world or people downright lying about their experience. Some of them put in insane amounts of practice, have a healthy dose of talent and some good coaching, so what you perceive as the norm might not be normal. Having the feeling you're not progressing does kill passion though. It's entirely normal to lose passion when you feel as if things are going badly. Sticking through it really won't help, you'll have to change how you look at it or what you do.

First of all you should get rid of the idea that there are things you should be able to do. Playing for 8 years says very little about how much you played, and even more importantly how much and how you practiced. Comparing yourself to earlier also might be rather tricky as your perception might simply have changed, and you might be a lot more critical for yourself.

Ask yourself what you want to be able to do, and then pay the price. Playing more won't help you if you're doing it wrong. Either get a good teacher (not simply a good player) or find some of the good materials on the internet (there's lots of great stuff). Don't tense up, practice slowly and gradually speed it up without making mistakes, losing fluidity or not playing clean. As soon as you start feeling you're going somewhere instead of moving in circles you'll be over it. Change the way you practice, trying to do "more" of something seldom works.
#5
So you're saying I'm going about this the wrong way and that it's not do much a climb, more a journey? I'll admit I didn't pay much outside of lessons which I admit was my biggest mistake. I could play when it counted though I was thinking I could zero the clock again and call 2014 the beginning and rebuild the right way. I'd built up a book of notes and guitar related theory which I've now lost so I have to rebuild that too
#6
Funny thing I discovered during my sports career (I did skiing professionaly until last year), life is the judge with ultimate justice. You NEVER EVER get something less or more than you deserve to have. You are unhappy about your results? Well thats what you get for training this much.

I think you should find the joy of practicing in order to play better. You must enjoy the journey, not the goal in order to be good at something.
#7
I'll continue to practice then. Ace of Spades won't be the song that beat me
#8
Yeah your day-to-day progress is pretty imperceptible. You might nail some little part of some song today that you were having problems with yesterday, and that brings a smile to your face. You just have to practice consistently and be content in the knowledge that over a long period of time, all those tiny improvements add up to a noticeable improvement in your overall technique.
#9
Quote by gtc83
Yeah your day-to-day progress is pretty imperceptible. You might nail some little part of some song today that you were having problems with yesterday, and that brings a smile to your face. You just have to practice consistently and be content in the knowledge that over a long period of time, all those tiny improvements add up to a noticeable improvement in your overall technique.


thanks

What a difference 24 hours makes. Picked up the song again and was playing...like a boss. Ok, maybe not quite like a boss yet, cause there are a number of things I'm aware off, but considering I only picked it up three or so days ago and have learnt one part and was playing at racing speed (the song's proper tempo) with the foot tapping and just going crazy with it I'd say I'm doing pretty good, but yesterday I just sucked!
#10
Well, for me I approach the (acoustic) guitar alittle bit differently in that I use it as a tool for songwriting. Naturally, I want to get technically 'better', but 'better' in my case means - will I express myself better if I practice so-and-so technique? If so, let's get moving. Otherwise, let's concentrating on writing. That fact alone keeps me motivated.

I'll be honest and say my guitar 'bag-of-tricks' is fairly limited to moderately-complex rhythm playing, quick chord changes and fingerpicking. I'm not a shredder at all, can only do limit alternate picking, and my solos are not technically complicated, but emphasis melody. But at this time, I'm satisfied with my skills, as long as I can write songs that sound *good*.
Last edited by Boldly-Rimmed at May 27, 2014,