#1
I was looking at getting a Boss br800 but everyone is telling me I need to use the computer, I did try reaper once and did not care for its interface, I tried ableton and getting it configured was a nightmare....so is computer really the way to go? Also I was thinking the br800 because it has drums,if I did use the computer what software should i use? what would i use for drums?
#2
Using a computer gives you a shit ton more options.
You could use whatever drum machine to program drums, there are a lot of good ones and some are even free.

Keep trying DAWs until you find one you like, then find some signal processors, play with stuff, edit stuff, cut and paste stuff, record and edit and re-record stuff...
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#3
As with many things, preference is the biggest difference. I use a multitracker as my DAW and have never found it limiting in any way.

I've also looked into switching to a PC based DAW on several occasions and it's offered me no benefits other than the pain of learning how the software works. Sticking with multitrackers has always been the best choice for me.

If all you want is a nice simple way to record your music, then a multitracker is a great option. Look at it as an extension of your guitar playing hobby - you can create extremely professional sounding recordings, but you're never going to become a serious sound tech.

If you want to get seriously into recording either as a profession, or even just a hobby in it's own right, even if you start out with a multitracker you'll need to switch to a PC eventually. If this is where your ambitions lie, a multitracker may be a way of getting to grips with the basics, but eventually you'll have to switch to a PC based DAW.
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#4
Download Audacity to start with. It's about as easy and intuitive as it gets (and free too). Plenty of good tutorials in their help section and, as with any DAW, plenty of videos on Youtube showing you how to do various things. After you've gotten used to that you could move on to Reaper (only $60 and although it's more complex than Audacity, it's not that much more complex) or any of the other DAW programs.

For drum machines here's a list of somebody's idea of the best one's: http://www.musicradar.com/us/tuition/drums/9-recommended-drum-software-packages-236534/1

That's four years old but it'll give you some info to start with, like the name brands at least.

If you don't have something already, you'll need some sort of analog/digital interface. Personally I've got a Pod Studio UX1, which is basically a black box - you plug the guitar into the front of it and a USB cable comes out the back which you plug into the computer. It comes with Pod Farm software which has a bunch of amp sim's and effects etc. It also comes with recording software, but mine had Reason which was very complex and so I use Reaper instead.
#5
Quote by gtc83
Download Audacity to start with. It's about as easy and intuitive as it gets (and free too). Plenty of good tutorials in their help section and, as with any DAW, plenty of videos on Youtube showing you how to do various things. After you've gotten used to that you could move on to Reaper (only $60 and although it's more complex than Audacity, it's not that much more complex) or any of the other DAW programs.

Audacity isn't a DAW, so much as it's a recording program. Don't use Audacity.
#6
Yeah you wouldn't want to be recording entire albums worth of material in Audacity when you could instead be spending your evenings doing Google searches on how to do every single simple little thing in a far more complex program.